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The last two AJs i've cleaned that were over 40 inches have had worms all through out the meat. In the past, the smaller ones have had just a pocket of worms near the tail, which i just cut out. These last few were so bad i couldn't see eating them. Is this typical of larger AJs? Should i just throw the bigger ones back and keep the barely legal ones?
 

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i personally dont like eating the bigger ones because they are full of worms and taste gamier, the latter part is true with ANY animal no matter what it is
 

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Your mom's a
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It's not that it's typical in all larger AJ but if you catch two off one wreck, same size, one has worms, chances are good the other one will too.



Same size fish 10 miles away might not.



It's not location, because they move, it's just a parasite they pick up. It's not size, I've seen little ones with worms.



The worms will not hurt you if you eat them. Not that I'm recommending this. Just saying.
 

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Folks should b seeing worms in the red's too....I threw back a big ole slot last year that had a bunch of worms coming out of it's fins and skin...but I'm sure ifin you cook em they won't hurt ya!:doh:letsdrink
 

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Jiggin Finatic
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100 % of the larger Ajs I have cleaned have had worms. Most of the time you can cut them out.
 

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Orion45 (3/24/2010)If you ingest some of the worms, don't worry. They will notharm you. Think of them as extra protein. :)
Taste like chicken. I honestly just fry the meat up and the worms just vanish. I or anyone else never taste them. But for some reason, I hardly get AJ's with worms in them. From small to large most of mine are worm free. Maybe the dumb ones thatswim into shooting range underwater just don't have worms. Not sure though.:doh
 

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i see the worms alot, but like said mostly in the tail. never saw them throughout the whole fish. hard to eat em once you see em. the worms that is. maybe a good fish to give out at work to someone you don't really like. no sense in wasting it.
 

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Tom Like I said Before Most of all the AJ's I have Caught will Have some Worms In Them Some more than Others!! The One I took To Mike That Night Only Had them In The Tail, Like everyone Has Said They Don't Change the Taste or Bad For you It's Just That Mind Thing!!!!!!:banghead, Hope you Had a Good Time Today!!!
 

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Redfish (3/24/2010)Tom Like I said Before Most of all the AJ's I have Caught will Have some Worms In Them Some more than Others!! The One I took To Mike That Night Only Had them In The Tail, Like everyone Has Said They Don't Change the Taste or Bad For you It's Just That Mind Thing!!!!!!:banghead, Hope you Had a Good Time Today!!!
You're right about it being a mind thing! I can get past it if I cut the worms out of the meat. Now Maria on the other it's best not to let here know they even had one worm, she won't go near it even if you said you cut the worm or worms out! Some things are just better left unsaid!:doh
 

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<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">I?ve never had one with worms too bad that I debated keeping it. I?ve eaten some pretty gnarly things when deployed so a few worms in a fish doesn?t seem too bad for me. Fry it up and it?s good to go.
 

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That's why up until the last few years, locals did not eat AJs. They were considered trash fish and were served and eaten mostly in reataurants by the tourists.
 

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Information from an article by the Florida Museum of Natural History:

"...Tapeworms occasionally infest greater amberjacks. Although this may be unappetizing, the worms are harmless to humans and may be cut away from the flesh and discarded prior to cooking. A monogean parasite (Zeuxapta seriolae) has been documented as parasitizing the gills of the greater amberjack..."

Another interesting fact about the Greater Amberjack from the same article:

"...Large greater amberjacks have been implicated in cases of ciguatera poisoning within certain areas of its range. Ciguatera poisoning is caused by the bioaccumulation of ciguatoxins in the flesh of tropical marine fishes. Ciguatoxins are produced by marine dinoflagellates that grow attached to marine algae and as such may be incidentally ingested by herbivorous fishes. Large piscivorous reef dwelling fishes occupying the apex of the food chain become reservoirs for the highest amounts of ciguatoxin by feeding on other members of the reef community. Poisoned people report gastrointestinal maladies that may last several days, a general weakness in their arms and legs, and a reversal in the ability to differentiate hot versus cold. The illness is serious and symptoms may persist for weeks..."

However, I believe that ciguatera in Greater Amberjacks must be more commonin South Florida waters than in the local(Destin, Pensacola,and Mobile) area.

Here is the link to the full article: http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/gallery/Descript/GreateramberJack/greateramberJack.html

While on the subject of worms,here is a photo of a filet of a speckled trout I caught in the sound in Aug 2009. I sent this photo to Coryphaena (Karon) last year asking about the worms and the following was her response:

"...The worms you see in trout are a stage of development of a shark tapeworm. Tapeworms have a complex life cycle and pass through several hosts, with the final host being the specific infective target. In this case, the tapeworm eggs are passed out of a shark, hatch onto larvae which are ingested by copepods, the larvae undergo a metamorphosis, and they're passed on up the food chain with more metamorphoses until they find their way into the muscle tissue of a trout. There seems to be a limit to the number that can live within a fish, and the worms seem to thrive in cleaner, saltier water. When the trout gets eaten by a shark, the worm finally morphs into what we know as a tapeworm and actually infects its host.

It wouldn't matter one way or another whether you removed or cooked the worms in the trout; they don't infect humans. Tapeworms are pretty host-specific, and we have our own "brand" of critters to worry about..."



The individual worms pull out fairly easy. The white nodules are easier to just cut out.So have it your own way.......without worms or with worms for that extragram of protein. :)
 

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The big red I have in my profile picture had one worm in it....it just fell out and we ate the fish...probably one of the greatest tasting fish I have ever eaten.
 

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BigBrandon (3/24/2010)i personally dont like eating the bigger ones because they are full of worms and taste gamier, the latter part is true with ANY animal no matter what it is
I've nevernoticed muchof adifference in tuna, wahoo, dolphin, swordfish or most pelagics in regards to size. They all seem to taste pretty good to me at any age. Reef fish like snapper and such definitely get worse with size.

I hardly keep AJ's because of the worms and as they increase the minimum size it will only mean more wormy meat to bring home. You can usually tell where the worms will be on an AJ by looking for areas on the skin that appear bruised or have loosened scales. In the picture below is a 60 inch AJ from the Marathon Jacket. In the red circles are the types of marks I'm referring to. This jack had so many worms in it that it was almost inedible. I know you can pick them out but I don't really like eating fish with worms.

 

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stonecoldshooter
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Worms may cook out. They may not infect humans. The science may be sound. And maybe one day these worms may evolve a little and decide humans are great hosts. I will not be giving them a chance to make that evoloutionary break through in my intestinal tract.
 

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SaltAddict (3/25/2010)Worms may cook out. They may not infect humans. The science may be sound. And maybe one day these worms may evolve a little and decide humans are great hosts. I will not be giving them a chance to make that evoloutionary break through in my intestinal tract.
+1
 
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