Pensacola Fishing Forum banner

1 - 20 of 66 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">Hello PFFer's,<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">For those of you who do not know me, I am Mike Cosse , <SPAN class=yshortcuts id=lw_1256599430_1>Food & BeverageDirector at the <SPAN class=yshortcuts id=lw_1256599430_2 style="BACKGROUND: none transparent scroll repeat 0% 0%; CURSOR: hand; BORDER-BOTTOM: #0066cc 1px dashed">HiltonPensacola Beachand The <SPAN class=yshortcuts id=lw_1256599430_3>Hampton Inn on Pensacola Beach. I am also known as LoupGarou on this Pensacola Fishing Forum. I am a bayou boy, originally from South Louisiana.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">I have really appreciated your business and I have most enjoyed the Wednesday Night Meet Up at our Tiki Hut. I love <SPAN class=yshortcuts id=lw_1256599430_4>shucking oysters for ya'll. My bartenders say this is the best night of the week for them.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">This Wednesday Night I have a special event planned for you guys. I am going to prepare "Cochon du Lait" which is a Roasted and Jambalaya Stuffed Suckling Pig.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">I will have <SPAN class=yshortcuts id=lw_1256599430_5 style="CURSOR: hand; BORDER-BOTTOM: #0066cc 1px dashed">Chicken Wings, since I heard some of you really love free wing events.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">And of course, I will have Oyster's as usual.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">I will also have a raffle for a 2 night stay at The HiltonPensacola Beachon Pensacola Beach!!!!! <P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">The Fun starts at 3:00 p.m. and will last until 8:00 p.m. The Raffle will occur at 7:00 P.m.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">Thank you for the great times and the support you guys and gals have displayed over the past months. Loyalty exists.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">Laissez les Bon temps rouler this Wednesday!!!!!!<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0pt"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana">LoupGarou a.k.a. Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,014 Posts
Oh man this is gonna be a good one!!



Can't wait Mike!



And by the way, anyone who hasn't ever been there on a wednesday night, its not just the oysters and cheap beer that make it good. !. it's a forum member runnin the show. But best of all, is the PFF people take the whole place over. It's like the tiki bar is just there for us...all the guys that work there with Mike are top notch fun guys, and join right in in the BS and s##ttalkin.



If you havent been there yet, you need to make this one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,324 Posts
<CENTER></CENTER><DIV align=left><P style="MARGIN: 0pt" class=MsoNormal>I have performed some Internet research to determinewhat to except Wednesday Night. I found the following.I know it varies from Chef to Chef, especially in Louisiana, where one prepares something one way, and another prepares it differently; the two argue and drink beer discussing which is better. <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p><P style="MARGIN: 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="FONT-FAMILY: Verdana; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-SIZE: 8pt"><o:p></o:p><P style="MARGIN: 0pt" class=MsoNormal>I know LoupGarou's will not be as described below, as his will be stuffed. But this will give you an idea.<o:p></o:p><P style="MARGIN: 0pt" class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="FONT-FAMILY: Verdana; COLOR: #1f5080; FONT-SIZE: 8pt"><o:p></o:p><P style="MARGIN: 0pt" class=MsoNormal>BananaTom<o:p></o:p><P style="MARGIN: 0pt" class=MsoNormal><o:p></o:p></DIV><CENTER>Cochon de Lait</CENTER>

Cochon de Lait literally translates from French to English as "pig in milk", or it is called a "suckling pig". A Cochon de Lait is basically a cajun pig roast of a whole young pig. The pig is slow roasted for 6 to 12 hours. That is what makes a Cochon de Lait an event rather than just cooking a meal. It's an extended "male bonding", "story telling", "bull shooting", "beverage of your choice drinking", "fire tending" event ! I learned how to roast a pig from my late brother-in-law Ronnie Nezat. Click for pictures of one of those early cochon de laits at Ronnie's hunting camp on the banks of the Atchafalaya River. <CENTER>

Ingredients</CENTER><TABLE border=0 width="100%" cols=2><TBODY><TR><TD><UL><LI>25 to 100 pound young pig <LI>injecting marinade (see recipe below) <LI>cajun seasoning mix (homemade, Chachere's or Zatarain's) </LI>[/list]</TD><TD><UL><LI>several heads of garlic <LI>cooking shed <LI>lots of wood </LI>[/list]</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

Preparing the Pig <UL><LI>Obtain a 25 to 100 pound young pig. I've usually cooked about a 70-80 pound pig. The largest pig I ever cooked was 115 lb, which fed about 80 people.
<TABLE border=0 width=500><TBODY><TR><TD>
</TD><TD>Cochon de lait - "pig in milk"

These are 80-100 pound pigs.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></LI>[/list]<UL><LI>The pig needs to be butchered by scraping and not skinning. The skin needs to be on the pig so the meat does not dry out. <LI>If you do not want the little fellow looking at you while its cooking, then cook it without the head. Personally, I consider having the head on part of the presentation of a cochon de lait. But by all means, remove the eyes. <LI>Prepare a sturdy frame to spread and skewer the pig. You will have to partially split the backbone of the rib cage from the body cavity side in order to spread the pig flat. The pig needs to be supported for its full length, or else it may fall apart when it gets tender.
<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 width=550 cols=2><TBODY><TR><TD><CENTER>
</CENTER></TD><TD>Pig with the legs attached to a top and bottom bar, with reinforcing wire for support.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><LI>Another method would be to sandwich the pig between wire mesh. </LI>[/list]Seasoning the Pig <UL><LI>This is the most important part. The pig needs to be injected with a marinade, stuffed with garlic, and coated on all sides with a seasoning mix. <LI>Inject Marinade: About a quart of marinade is injected into all parts of the pig. Use an injector needle that has holes on the side. I have never made the same marinade twice, but it is always mixture containing a cajun seasoning mix, garlic powder or juice, onion powder or juice, hot pepper sauce, Worcestershire sauce, and sometimes butter. For starters, try the following turkey injecting recipe, without butter.
<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=550><TBODY><TR><TD><BLOCKQUOTE>Injecting Marinade</BLOCKQUOTE><UL><LI>liquid garlic, 6 oz <LI>liquid onion, 6 oz <LI>liquid crab boil, 3 oz <LI>Worcestershire sauce, 6 oz <LI>Tabasco/red pepper sauce, 6 oz <LI>cajun seasoning mix (homemade, Chachere's or Zatarain's), 6 tbs <LI>makes about 28 oz </LI>[/list]</TD><TD><CENTER>

Inject the marinade into all parts</CENTER></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><LI>Stuff Garlic: Peel the cloves of garlic. Cut cloves in half lengthwise . Moisten and coat the cloves in cajun seasoning mix. With a slender, sharp knife, cut small slits in the skin and into the meat. Insert a 1/2 clove garlic in each slit. Insert garlic into all parts of the pig. For my taste, you cannot overdo the garlic! <LI>Coat with Cajun Seasoning Mix: Coat all surfaces with a good cajun seasoning mix (homemade, Chachere's or Zatarain's). <LI>Allow the pig to marinade in a cooler or on ice at least overnight, and longer if possible. </LI>[/list]Methods of Cooking <UL><LI>Cooking Shed: The method I use is a cooking shed made out of tin. The shed needs to be about 4-6 feet wide, about 6 feet tall, and 6-8 feet deep. You can build the three sides and top as panels, so the shed can be quickly assembled and disassembled. A rotisserie needs to be mounted above an opening at the front of the shed, and above the tin so it is out of the heat. You can use a small electric rotisserie like those available for gas barbecue pits . The pig needs to be hung from a rotisserie so it constantly turns at a slow speed. This method requires a lot of logs because the fire has to burn for a half day or more - so be prepared. <TABLE border=0 width=600><TBODY><TR><TD>
<CENTER>First generation cooking shed at a
Floriculture Club lake outing in the 1980s</CENTER></TD><TD><CENTER>
"New and Improved" cooking shed at the 2002 Horticulture Reunion
Note: Chicken cooking on a rod in the upper right, and a rack cooking a brisket in the upper left of the shed. Click for larger still image.</CENTER></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></LI>[/list]<UL><LI>Cajun Microwave: My good friend, the late Gene Duos, built a metal lined plywood box with racks inside to lay the pig, or what ever you're cooking. The top is metal and double walled, containing a propane burner over a metal plate. Wood chips are laid on the metal plate to create the smoke and the burner can be regulated to adjust the temperature. The picture below shows Gene and his son, the late Barry Duos, cooking pig in his Cajun Microwave for a undergraduate club outing on South Padre Island. Boy has he cooked some good food in the old box! <TABLE border=0 width=600><TBODY><TR><TD>
</TD><TD>Gene (right) and Barry (left) Duos, and Gene's Cajun Microwave</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></LI>[/list]<UL><LI>Some hang the pig from a frame, such as a swing set, and the pig is rotisseried next to or above an open fire.
Some roast the pig on a parallel rack suspended above a coal filled ground pit.</LI>[/list]Cooking the Pig <UL><LI>Start the fire in the back of the shed. Let the fire burn until you have good coals to keep the logs burning. <LI>Hang the pig and start the rotisserie. <LI>Keep enough wood on the fire so it is hot enough that you can stand or hold your hand by the pig for only 5 or 10 seconds. I have no idea what temperature that would be (I'll measure it next time), but I'm guessing about 180 to 200 <SUP>o</SUP>F. It's not a bad idea to start out with a pretty hot fire to get the outside of the pig up to temperature quickly, then let the fire die down a bit for the rest of the cooking period. <LI>Flip the pig and hang it from the other side every couple of hours so the pig will cook evenly. <LI>Now comes the easy part. Sit back, drink a cold beverage, throw some wood on the fire every now and then, tell some bad jokes, and enjoy the company of your friends. <LI>Cook the pig until the skin is golden brown, starts cracking, and the meat starts drawing away from the bones. This can be anywhere from 6 to 12 hours, depending on how hot you kept the fire and the size of the pig. <LI>If you like, you can insert a meat thermometer into the hind quarter to check the internal temperature. Cookbooks indicate a temperature of of 170 <SUP>o</SUP>F is desired for pork. However, the only time I ever measured the internal temperature, it never went above 155 <SUP>o</SUP>F , yet the pig was cooked through-out and the meat was falling off the bones. Go figure! </LI>[/list]Lagniappe <UL><LI>When our shop built the last cooking shed, I had them hang a rod in the top of the shed to skew chickens and hang sausage, and hang a rack to cook briskets. <TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=550 cols=2><TBODY><TR><TD><CENTER>

Cooking brisket to go with the pork</CENTER></TD><TD><CENTER>

Cooking chicken to feed the cooks</CENTER></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></LI>[/list]<UL><LI>The chickens and sausage are to feed the cooks while cooking the pig, and the briskets are done about the time the pig is done. </LI>[/list]Carving and Serving <UL><LI>Lay the cooked pig on a flat surface, skin side down. Filet the meat off the bone and away from the skin.
<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=550 cols=2><TBODY><TR><TD><CENTER>
</CENTER></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><LI>Enjoy the feast! </LI>[/list]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,324 Posts
<CENTER><H1 align=left>And then I found this version:</H1><P align=left><H1>COCHON DE LAIT (Pit-roasted pork); or
How I got a guy from Israel to eat pig. </H1></CENTER>
<BLOCKQUOTE>Cochon de lait is one of Acadiana's most famous and most delectable dishes -- marinated, pit-roasted young suckling pig, sliced thin and served with gravy, on a plate or on a po-boy. The mere aroma of this dish is enough to make your knees buckle, not to mention the taste. In fact, it's sinfully good ... good enough to make a nice Jewish boy eat treyf.

Several years ago my friend Doron, who's originally from Israel, came down to New Orleans along with his girlfriend to experience Jazzfest for the first time. He reckoned, quite correctly, that given his lack of knowledge of the ins and outs of the Crescent City, it'd be a very good idea if he went down to Jazzfest in my company. We had a blast, of course; he took to the city instantly, and it was beginning to look like all he'd need to "go native" is a Nint' Ward accent.

All of the Creole and Cajun gustatory delights offered or suggested were gleefully devoured, and he was always energetic, looking for something else to try. At one point on the Fairgrounds during the Fest, I made a beeline to one of my very favorite food booths, a must-stop at least once every year -- the cochon de lait booth. The family that was serving pig at that time did a beautiful job. Melt-in-your-mouth tender slices of roast pork, drenched in aromatic, deeply flavored gravy, piled high on a po-boy loaf. The same booth also served the venerable Fried Potato Po-Boy (the first po-boy ever), smothered in the same gravy; for the truly brave, their Combo po-boy had both sliced roast pork and fried potatoes (my favorite!)

I got one and dug in even before we found a place to sit and eat. The aroma of that meat and that gravy on that sandwich was intoxicating; there was no way I was going to wait. I had already had an iced tea ready to go, so I didn't even have to wait to get something to wash it down with.

Evidently Doron was finding the aroma to be intoxicationg as well. He just stared at my sandwich, a thousand-yard-stare, his irises and pupils practically turning into spinning spirals. "Oh my God," he said, and brought his face so close to my po-boy that there'd be a danger of my biting his nose off if he were any closer. "My God," he said again, "that is incredible. Incredible! I haff to have thees! I haff to!"

He spun and bolted toward the booth, and got a large one.

He was unwrapping it as he returned to where I was standing, the expression on his face not unlike that of a tomb raider who had just opened a chest filled with gold pieces. He looked lovingly at his new precious jewel, opened his mouth to take a bite, hesistated, then looked back at me and said with a slight look of dismay, "This is all pig?"

Now, Doron was a secular Jew, and not terribly observant, at least at that time; I didn't think he kept strict kosher, but I wanted to make sure he knew exactly what he was getting into. "Yep, I'm afraid so," I replied.

He looked back at his cochon de lait po-boy, sighed, shrugged, said, "Oh well ... my poor mother," and quickly removed a Gargantuan crescent-shaped bite of his beloved new pig sandwich. The entire thing was gone in less than five minutes.

One person to whom I told this story said, "Oh, you are so going to hell." Hell shmell, so I inadvertently made a nice Jewish boy eat treyf. G-d'll forgive me. (All He needs to do is smell that cochon and He'll understand.)

This is cochon de lait as once prepared at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival by the Timphony and Stewart Families. This particular recipe was taken from the old Jazz and Heritage Festival Cookbook, now sadly out of print. Here's a link to another good cochon de lait recipe as well.</BLOCKQUOTE>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,324 Posts
<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=741><TBODY><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=14 colSpan=4>

Louisiana People are always looking for a festival:</TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=106></TD><TD width=547 colSpan=2>
</TD><TD></TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=11 colSpan=4></TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=4></TD><TD rowSpan=2 width=547 colSpan=2>
<MAP id=map0 name=map0><AREA href="./html/schedule.html" shape=rect coords=7,1,88,17><AREA href="./html/entertainment.html" shape=rect coords=93,0,206,17><AREA href="./html/applications.html" shape=rect coords=213,1,375,17><AREA href="./html/the_food.html" shape=rect coords=384,0,459,17></MAP></TD><TD></TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=13></TD><TD colSpan=2></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=741><TBODY><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=11 width=10>
</TD><TD></TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=1></TD><TD width=731>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=632><TBODY><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=13 width=119>
</TD><TD></TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=53></TD><TD width=513><CENTER><CENTER></CENTER></CENTER></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=721><TBODY><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=473><TBODY><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=50 width=18>
</TD><TD></TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=616></TD><TD width=455><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=454><TBODY><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=616 width=454>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD><TD><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=248><TBODY><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=110 width=17>
</TD><TD width=231>
</TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD></TD><TD class=TextObject width=231><P style="TEXT-ALIGN: center"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 20pt">May 7-10, 2009<P style="MARGIN-BOTTOM: 0px"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 16pt">The Cochon de Lait Festival held annually on Mother's Day Weekend mixes great cajun food, good times and music with cochon de lait (french for roast suckling pig)to create an unforgettable experience. Plenty for the entire family to pass a good time. Festival offers a giant Midway, nightly street dances, great cajun food, contests, parade, arts/crafts booths and so much more.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=741><TBODY><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=54 width=10>
</TD><TD></TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=1></TD><TD width=731>
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width=734><TBODY><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD height=2 width=17>
</TD><TD width=717>
</TD></TR><TR vAlign=top align=left><TD></TD><TD class=TextObject width=717><P style="TEXT-ALIGN: center; MARGIN-BOTTOM: 0px"><SPAN style="COLOR: rgb(128,128,128); FONT-SIZE: 12px">© 2008 Mansura Chamber of Commerce
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,324 Posts
<H2 class=head2>Cochon de Lait Festival
Mansura, LA
May 7-10, 2009
</H2>

In Acadiana, cochon de lait is the ultimate celebration food. A large gathering and special occasion seem almost necessary to make the time and effort that go into preparing and roasting the young pig worthwhile. So it?s appropriate that in Mansura, LA, there?s no occasion more special, and no gathering larger, than the annual Cochon de Lait Festival ? an event celebrating the food that marks so many other celebrations around these parts.

Held each year on Mother?s Day Weekend, the Cochon de Lait Festival first took place in 1960. It was an immediate hit and grew more popular each year. In 1972, about 100,000 people arrived in Mansura for the festival. It was too many people, and the town, with a population less than 2,000, was overwhelmed. For 15 years, the people of Mansura took a break from the Cochon de Lait Fest. But in 1987 came its triumphant return.

The throngs descend on little Mansura in central Louisiana each May for Cajun food, live music, rides, games, contests, street dances, parades, arts & crafts booths...and more cochon de lait than you can shake a stick at.

The festival is the perfect place to witness the time-tested ritual that is cochon de lait preparation. The pig is dressed and placed in a wire rotisserie cage ? the same design that has been used for generations. A roasting shanty is constructed and filled with piles of pecan and hickory wood. Dangling in the heat and smoke above the smoldering wood, rows and rows of cochon de lait roast to perfection in their wire racks. It?s a sight to behold, and the source of beguiling aromas that perfume the air, drawing hungry people from around the festival grounds like the Pied Piper of Pork.

2009 dates: May 7-10, 2009
(2010 dates: May 6-9)

Admission: Free. Street dance admission is $5 per adult.

Directions: From Alexandria, take La. Hwy. 1 south, approximately 35 miles, to Mansura. From Baton Rouge, take Airline Highway (LA-190) out of the city. The same road will become La. Hwy. 1. Continue on La. Hwy. 1 into Mansura, approximately 60 miles. The festival is at the Cochon de Lait Civic Center on Main Street in Mansura.

For more information, visit www.cochondelaitfestival.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,324 Posts
So it appears the Cochon de Lait Festival comes to Pensacola Beach, Wednesday, October 28, 2009, in PFF format.

And I guarantee - Cause I know LoupGarou - it will be worth the drive!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,422 Posts
You rock! I always remember showing up there but the rest of the night comes to me the next day.... My girlfriend.... Text messages.... Recipts... Calls from friends. Making sure we are still. Cool. Lol I will be there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Wow Tom way to go!!!!!! a big part of my family is from Mansura, La. The Cochon de Lait festival is a must for anyone that loves a good time and good people. Raffle tickets are FREE!!!!! Like all the food!!!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,079 Posts
LoupGarou (10/26/2009)Wow Tom way to go!!!!!! a big part of my family is from Mansura, La. The Cochon de Lait festival is a must for anyone that loves a good time and good people. Raffle tickets are FREE!!!!! Like all the food!!!!!!!!!!!
Holy smokes I have not been to a Cochon De Lait since I lived in Baton Rouge. Man what a great time, for those of you that have never been it is a great time. I went to one at Cafe Lousianne in BR on Corporate Blvd. The place is gone but the memories will last forever. Good times, good times.:letsdrink
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
Mike,

I have about 20lbs of wings I will bring and donate to the event...I used to give the advice to all my employees so I may as well heed it..."If you can't beat em' join em"
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
Top