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Discussion Starter #1
I'm very interested in learning the science behind fishing. Like I've said before I'm new, but id like to be self sufficient and not rely so much on going out with someone more experienced. While I've enjoyed it, and will continue to, I don't want to be a hinderance to my fishing buddies. Everyone I've met fishing has been awesome, they've been very kind, and I DONT want to be the anchor.

That being said, I've been doing a lot of google searching on weather patterns and fishing. Frankly it's frustrating. One site says fish bite more on a low, one says they bite more on a high. One says low tide, another says high tide. Don't even get me started on moon phases, my brain is already fried. So I end up confused and back exactly where I started. The only thing I took away from them is the importance of a fishing journal. . What does everyone look for weather and water clarity wise when they're targeting, reds,trout, mangrove snapper,sheepshead etc?


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I'd Love to Catch a
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I go fishing when I want to, I stay home when I don't feel like it.

Haha, no but for real I'm sure a lot of guys can give you some better insight on this.
 

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i aint no expert by no means... but the only thing i look at is the tides and wind. for me as long as the water is moving and a calm wind im gone fishin! good luck and tight lines!!
 

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Master of Disaster
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I'm no pro- angler, but here is what I have picked up....
Fishing along the GOM and Atlantic coasts, one thing for sure I have learned... sunny skies and flat, super clear seas does not necessarily mean a great bite.
Yea- don't over think it- but a few basic tricks might help your bite....
One tip, you'll need to pick up on things like season, tide, and even air and water temperature and how the bite was affected where you were fishing- right? Not something you'll pick up over night! Also, as a part of this tip- notice during the hottest days of summer and coldest days of winter, the shallow grass flats along the northern gulf coast get deserted. The gamefish head for more accommodating temperatures in deeper water (channels and deep holes). Of course that varies on the time of day / sunshine, and water temp.
All anglers might agree on the inshore bite being better on a moving tide- that's why most refrain from fishing during a neap tide (where there is little or no difference between high and low tides). This trick is probably more about "moving water" / current.
Another tip- "personally", I thought the bite was a bit better (usually associated with fall thru spring frontal boundaries and movement thru our area) prior to the front moving through- but like you said, that's been debated.
You probably already know to look for structure and bait- fist baits (especially if fishing artificials) "to match the hatch". But one of my biggest tips is be determined- patient- and don't give up!
I know I haven't really said too much about weather- but I don't pay too much attention to it as far as planning my trip so I don't get caught in the rain... or by bad seas brought on by a squall or storm. I try not to let it slow me down too much!
If one thing is not working for me, I'll switch up and try something else- somewhere else.
A lot of it has to do with trial and error- try it, win or loose, you use the experience to learn about the fish bite and how you think it was affected by the conditions.
My final tip- keep asking around.... And (yes, I'll say it again) if you are having a tough time getting the fish to bite, get by Sams Stop N Shop in Orange Beach and see Chris!
I hope this has been at least somewhat helpful- and I'm sure more comments, opinions, and tips will come.

Also check these links:

Weather, solar, lunar cycles, and fishing.

Fishing and weather question
 

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I'm very interested in learning the science behind fishing.
Science hell, it's an art.

Just joking. There is some science involved but there is a lot of feeling, seeing, smelling and intuition.

Like the young man said, go when you can, be observant, remember what you saw, what happened and what the conditions were when it happened. Go a lot. There is nothing that beats experience and putting in the hours.

Tides, moons, I just like water movement.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I appreciate the replies. It seems like there is one constant in fishing. If you're catching lots of fish, it's a good time to go. If you're not, then it's not.

I'm going to start a fishing journal
So I can keep track of this stuff. That should help me create a more
Complete game plan. Thanks!


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Master of Disaster
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I appreciate the replies. It seems like there is one constant in fishing. If you're catching lots of fish, it's a good time to go. If you're not, then it's not.

I'm going to start a fishing journal
So I can keep track of this stuff. That should help me create a more
Complete game plan. Thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The only thing I can add is, don't let it get in the way of having fun fishing :thumbup:- and there you know there are an awful lot of variables....
Good Luck!
 

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AK 540;

I have a bit different take on this.

I DO pay attention to tides, moon and wind.
I don't fish when conditions are less than ideal, I've found over the yrs. it's a scouting trip at best. 100's of hours on the water have taught me this...stay home and make nicey-nice to your wife/girlfriend.

Based on my humble opinion...to consistently catch good fish, water movement is critical. Even during NEAP tides you'll have water movement. small fish can be fooled pretty easily, the big trophy trout (my main target) are much harder to locate/catch.

MY best conditions for daytime fishing is: incoming or falling tide, anything less than a full moon, winds play a part in this also as it pushes bait and game fish around.

For winter fishing, I fish deep, from 5ft. - 20ft. for trout & reds....why?
cause in the winter our salt water column is deeper than spring/summer months. Salt water fishes will stay in the salt water column...get there, stay there with the lure/bait presentation...you'll get hook-ups.

on our bright clear sunny cold days, trout will tend to move onto shallower water IF BAIT IS PRESENT...other wise leave the shallow stuff for Mar.- Nov.

Bear in mind I fish blackwater river system 99.9% of the time and I'm referring to river fishing vs. bay, ICW, etc.

The biggest mistake I see other fisherman make...fishing the wrong way Vs. tidal movement. There is no benefit to running lures the opposite direction the fish are facing...you're just educating them not catching them.

keep a journal, record what you're doing when you catch fish...duplicate this in similar spots.
 

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Barefoot had some good advice. There are tons of factors that affect the bite, so it may be most efficient to target the dominant factors first. First factor, fish when the fish are feeding: During many times, fish are not feeding so its difficult to get them to strike a lure, even one thats right in front of them. Thats why people want water movement (its driven by the tides, hence all the tide tables), fish feed when water is moving (there are energy efficiency reasons for this). I use tides4fishing.com to predict this, but you need to know that the tides are for a point usually at the pass of a bay, and the high/low will be delayed for points back in the bay. Up to an hour or two in many of these bays around here. So, dont fish at high tide, or low tide, use that website to find out when they are, and factor in some delay. Early morning is often best for me, so I look for days with the right tides before 9AM, or in the last two hours of daylight.
Second factor, presentation: The best thing to do is just use live bait, its a game changer and will help you get up the learning curve faster. Otherwise, while you are trying to figure out where the fish are, how deep, and when they bite, you will need to fine tune lure selection and presentation, its just too many factors to untangle if you are a newbie and trying to find a pattern. Everything eats shrimp, live is best. I use mullet or pinfish cause I can cast net them.
Once you are out there when the fish are feeding, and you have bait they find appealing, you need to have that bait in the water as much as possible, that the third factor. Try to fish when wind is less than 10mph, 15 is ok but hard. You will just fight the wind and spend less time with your bait near the fish. Use spinning reels at first, you will have fewer backlashes and more time fishing
 
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