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Scot,</DIV>This might be worthwhile to send out the members to see what others are doing without</DIV>getting their fisheries shut down. In the US these people would spend their days in jail.</DIV></DIV>Bill</DIV>
</DIV><DIV class=Section1><P class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Calibri','sans-serif'; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 11pt">All should see this. While American fishermen are being severely restricted and punished due to efforts by the enviros and the fact that under our management system the people can be targeted and removed from the water or be required to spend thousands of dollars to regear and carry unnecessary tools on vessels already limited in available space, the ?real? problem is shown in pictures below. Clearly, the removal of the turtle eggs prevents turtles from hatching, thus surviving. Typical management by the noaa/nmfs, apply a band aid rather than address the problem, sounds like ?catch shares? doesn?t it?<SPAN style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Arial','sans-serif'; COLOR: black; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">


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</DIV></DIV></DIV><DIV id=IncrediOriginalFontSize><P class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 18pt">What's happened to the World Wildlife organization, and Greenpeace which is always making a lot of noise? Empty barrels??? This should never happen !!!!!! Turtle eggs are a delicacy and I guess the poor people in Costa Rica need to harvest these eggs to survive, but think about the future if this is allowed to go unchecked.</DIV><P class=MsoNormal></DIV><P class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="COLOR: #1f497d; FONT-SIZE: 36pt"> World Wide shame<SPAN style="COLOR: maroon; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">in<SPAN class=apple-converted-space><SPAN style="COLOR: red; FONT-SIZE: 36pt"><SPAN style="COLOR: red; FONT-SIZE: 36pt">COSTA RICA<P class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="COLOR: red; FONT-SIZE: 36pt">
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<P class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="COLOR: red; FONT-SIZE: 36pt">and we can only keep two snapper!!!!!!!!<P class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="COLOR: red; FONT-SIZE: 36pt">i guess there is no limit on turtle eggs in costa rica!<P class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="COLOR: red; FONT-SIZE: 36pt">scot<P class=MsoNormal><SPAN style="COLOR: red; FONT-SIZE: 36pt"></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV></DIV>
 

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First of all its a legal, regulated and sustainableharvest as part of a conservation plan, reference:

Outline
Email that call for a stop to a supposed "attack against nature" on the beaches of Costa Rica claims that a series of attached photographs depict crowds of people digging up and stealing turtle eggs that they will later sell.


<B style="COLOR: red">Brief Analysis[/B]
The photographs are genuine, but they do not depict the illegal poaching of turtle eggs. In fact, the egg harvest shown in the photographs is a perfectly legal and strictly controlled event that is managed by the Costa Rican government and been in operation since the 1980's. Far from being an "attack against nature", the egg harvest is an integral part of a long term conservation program that has resulted in a significant increase in the successful hatchings of Olive Ridley Turtles.

Every picture tells a story, they say. However, just how accurate and relevant that story may be is dependant on the context in which the picture appears and the preconceptions and expectations of the viewer. Things are not always what they seem.

This widely circulated series of images depicting the collection of turtle eggs from a beach in Costa Rica is a case in point. The photographs themselves are perfectly genuine and they certainly do show the harvesting of turtle eggs. However, this egg harvest is not an illegal poaching operation nor is it an environmentally destructive "attack against nature" as suggested in the text that accompanies these photographs.

Instead, the turtle egg harvest is an important part of a long-term environmental project developed and managed by the Costa Rican government. The photographs show an egg harvest by villagers at Ostional beach, a remote community near Punta Gurones on Costa Rica's Pacific coast. In 1983, the Costa Rican government created the Ostional Wildlife Refuge in the area and later initiated the Egg Harvest Project (EHP). The EHP allowed villagers to continue their traditional practice of harvesting eggs while furthering the long term goal of assisting in the conservation and recovery of the Olive Ridley turtle species. The harvests are strictly controlled, with villagers only allowed to take eggs within the first day and a half of each egg laying event, known as an "arribada". An article about the Olive Ridley turtle published on the Ocean Actions website notes: <BLOCKQUOTE>The capacity of the half mile Ostional beach is insufficient for the large number of nesting turtles and as a result many clutches are destroyed in the nesting process. As thousands upon thousands of Olive Ridley turtles climb on to a stretch of Playa Ostional, 70-80% of previously laid nests are crushed or dug up during the subsequent nesting. It is for this reason that the Egg Harvest Project is justified. Villagers wait and watch, harvesting the eggs laid in the first day and half of the arribada.

Over the years this practice has proven to increase the percentage of successful hatching by as much as 20%. Assessing a sea turtle population is a challenge, but nesting data in Ostional indicate a stable population. A major contribution to the success of the Egg Harvest Project is the lack of decomposing eggs. If the (sic) left unharvested, the early nests that are destroyed by later nesting females act as a source of bacteria that can contaminate the later nests.
</BLOCKQUOTE>

A 1998 article by John Burnett, correspondent for National Public Radio, also discusses the project: <BLOCKQUOTE>The age-old belief in the aphrodisiac power of turtle eggs sustains a thriving black market for the forbidden ovum throughout Latin America. Most countries have banned the collection of these eggs because the world's eight sea turtle species are endangered by disease, incidental capture in fishing nets, disturbance of nesting areas, and poaching of eggs and turtles.

But in the coastal town of Ostional, located on Costa Rica's Guanacaste Peninsula, a 13-year-old project has helped stabilize the population of the olive ridley sea turtle. The government has, in essence, legalized poaching.

For 10 months of the year, usually around the third quarter of the moon, olive ridleys swim by the hundreds of thousands to a single mile of beach at Ostional in an ancient reproductive rite little understood by scientists. They scuttle onto the sand, dig a hole with their flippers, and drop in an average of 100 leathery, white eggs the size of ping pong balls. Over the course of a five-day "arribada," literally, an arrival, nesting females will leave as many as 10 million eggs in the black, volcanic sand. Mass nesting is nature's way of ensuring that after the turkey vultures, feral dogs and raccoons have eaten all the fresh eggs they want, there will be enough left over to produce a sustainable population of olive ridleys.

In the early 1980s, scientists learned that because of limited space on the beach, females arriving later destroy the first laid eggs. The researchers wondered: why not let poachers have the doomed eggs?

"What we have done is turn people into predators," says Dr. Anny Chavez, a sea turtle biologist and one of the founders of the Ostional project, which is world famous among turtle activists.

Under a law written especially for Ostional, the government allows an egg harvesting cooperative to collect all they can during the first 36 hours of every arribada. Coop members then truck the eggs around the country, selling them to bars and restaurants. In return, the community must protect the olive ridley. Coop members clean debris from the nesting areas and patrol the beach day and night for poachers. Forty days later, when the hatchlings emerge, children from the Ostional Primary school run to the beach.
</BLOCKQUOTE>

Other photographs of Ostional available online clearly show that the photographs in the above sequence do indeed depict the beach at Ostional. And, if the images really did depict an illegal poaching activity, the large crowd of would-be poachers shown would very likely be more clandestine in their activities. Those egg harvesters shown in the images are obviously conducting their activities in a very open manner and clearly show no objection to being photographed. Not the sort of behaviour one would expect from callous poachers engaging in illegal activities.

Thus, the suggestion in this "protest" email that images depict an event of "world wide shame" and an 'attack against nature' is misguided. And the request to send the message on in the hope of stopping the egg harvest is also misguided. As noted above, the Egg Harvest Project at Ostional helps to protect and sustain this precious species. The project represents an innovative, and so far successful approach to species protection. Spreading misinformation in the form of this inflammatory and misleading protest message will serve only to divert attention away from genuine environmental concerns. The illegal and uncontrolled poaching of sea turtle eggs, meat and shells in many parts of the world represents a real and ongoing threat to turtle species. But, castigating and misrepresenting a group of people who have, for many years, participated in a perfectly legal egg harvest that has demonstrably improved the long term outlook for Olive Ridley turtles is counterproductive to say the least.




http://www.hoax-slayer.com/costa-rica-turtle-eggs.shtml

Second of all what the heckwould you expect NOAA to do about it? Its a US government agency, not the UN, they have no control over what other countries do. If its government controlled and sustainable who cares who harvests what as long as its regulated carefully.
 

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60hertz (3/19/2010)thanks alle9219 for posting the facts.


+1



I was gonna say, that didn't seem like something that would happen in Costa Rica. Maybe another Central American country, but Costa is pretty good about conservation.
 

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devildog83 (3/19/2010)It might be legal but doesn't make much sense!
In Minnesota and Wisconsin they have controlledlegal deerhunts certain parts ofCITY to try to control the exploding deer population...

Maybe the same for turtles in Costa Rica

Jim
 

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devildog83 (3/19/2010)It might be legal but doesn't make much sense!
What doesn't make sense to you? Sea turtles lay 100+ eggs knowing 99% of them won't make it to adulthood, and most of them won't even hatch. The beach is so small that females digging holes for their own nest are actually destroying previously laid clutches by accident. Then the dead and broken eggs in close quarters spread disease whichkills more eggs, and predators get in on the action and gorge themselves. So instead of leaving millions of eggs go to waste in the sandpeople go in, harvest a certain quantity of eggs that wouldn't have hatched anyways which is feeding people, earning money, fighting poaching, and now the community cares about these turtles and have further increased conservation efforts. The hatching success has gone up 20%, raising the populationand the locals have their cake and can eat it too. Thats what conservation is all about. Turkey and Whitetail Deer have similar histories of rebounding from unlimited market hunting to all time population highs today. Does it make sense now?
 

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alle9219 (3/19/2010)
devildog83 (3/19/2010)It might be legal but doesn't make much sense!


What doesn't make sense to you? Sea turtles lay 100+ eggs knowing 99% of them won't make it to adulthood, and most of them won't even hatch. The beach is so small that females digging holes for their own nest are actually destroying previously laid clutches by accident. Then the dead and broken eggs in close quarters spread disease whichkills more eggs, and predators get in on the action and gorge themselves. So instead of leaving millions of eggs go to waste in the sandpeople go in, harvest a certain quantity of eggs that wouldn't have hatched anyways which is feeding people, earning money, fighting poaching, and now the community cares about these turtles and have further increased conservation efforts. The hatching success has gone up 20%, raising the populationand the locals have their cake and can eat it too. Thats what conservation is all about. Turkey and Whitetail Deer have similar histories of rebounding from unlimited market hunting to all time population highs today. Does it make sense now?


I hope so.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks for posting that alle9219i feel a lot better knowing that the turtle eggs are being saved and not made into a omlet! i will copy and send out your post to the members in the club. should have check before posting but i was in a hurry yesterday. lots to do! i hate posting wrong propaganda emails! but it came from a good friend and did not question it!

thanks again

scot
 

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not fair they run all over us commercial fisherman but they let a bunch women , children and men go have a field day stealin eggs from a endangered turtle species
 

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I agree we should be able to catch more snapper, but how does turtle eggs in Costa Rico have anything to do with our redsnapper?Move to Costa Rico and catch all the fish you want.
 

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I have a brother-in-law and sister-in-law that are both costa rican. Yes they do go out at night and wait for the females to come to shore on secluded beachesand they claim a nesting female to harvest thier eggs for consuption and they are allowed to do so. they have been doing it forever. They don't take all the eggs and there are so many nesting females on the beach that there simply isn't enough room for them all. My brother went along for one of these family events and said they are delicious. You know why there isn't enough room for all the female to nest? Because the other beaches are developed for our(tourist) pleasure. They even eat the turtles and i hear they are pretty tasty too. Don't get me wrong I'm not saying I support it but its thier right just as it should be our right to harvest the endangered red snapper(more than 2 when they say).
 

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what im sayin is the state of florida wont let the commercial fisherman hardly do anything and are cracking down harder on the recs to when there is plenty of snapper out there but when a sea turtle species is endangered and you got a bunch costies runnin all over the beachs stealin eggs and causing a burrier in the growth of that population and a chance to get off the endangered species list , but there is some awesome big game fishing there hoping to go there with dad and one of friends after the season for a vacation
 
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