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Discussion Starter #1
Good morning, PFF! Now that the winds have finally started to die down it's time to head back on the water and tighten some lines. I've been absolutely wearing out the specks the last few weeks, but I'd really like to get back into some decent red action again.

For the longest time I couldn't buy a solid trout bite, but the reds were keeping me busy. Now I'll catch 20-30 specks and there isn't a red to be found (not even a rat)! Granted, I've been fishing a little bit different areas for the trout, but only because the usual areas that have held reds in the past have been unproductive.

If anyone would like to swap tactics (hence the title), I'd be happy to do so if it puts me on some of those pumpkins again! I'm talking time of day, tackle, depth, current, casting direction, retrieval, etc., that's how detailed I can be. be

I know I can go to the bridges at night and get into the bulls, but I'm more of an early morning guy who favors the topwater bite on the flats.

Take care,

Jake
 

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Seems to me that TOPWATER ON THE FLATS EARLY MORNING should be the answer. Switch to a larger, more noisy lure, e.g., R2S Whopper Plopper size 130 in bone w/ retrieve-stop-retrieve action, large Storm Rattlin Chug Bug, etc...
 

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Apex
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Early morning topwater. Caught a nice slot and a rat last week on a super spook jr trout color. Super spook in bone white produces as well.
 
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On Monday, Thursday, and Friday of last week I caught numerous mid to upper slot reds around the deeper creek mouths on the east side of Escambia Bay - all caught on a red 1/8 oz Hank Brown Hookup jig head with a Mirrolure Lil' John Provoker in the Golden Bream color and some mullet flavored Pro Cure gel slathered on it.

Fish were biting from daylight until around 8:30 and then the bite slowed up.

Couldn't buy a topwater bite.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, fellas. Sounds like I've been doing the right things (early morning spook on the flats and troughs), so I guess I'm just not picking the right ones. I have been working Escambia, but I thought maybe the salinity was too low after all the rain we had this summer.

The trout have been stacked in the sound, right at the 5'-7' dropoff on the last two hours of the tide (I still catch them at slack tide, but not nearly as many). Topwater, MR-17, jerk shad, jig, whatever have been working (color doesn't seem to matter). Casting anywhere in the area of the drop off works, but going parallel seems to have the best results, especially when I cast into the sun (painful, but effective).

The blues, lady fish, and grass have been thick, so you may have to weed (no pun intended) through these to get what you want.

Unfortunately, almost every trout has had worms, so if you like to keep what you catch (which I do), just be ready to throw a lot of filets away. I haven't caught any monsters this summer, but most are in the 16"-20" range.

Keep em' tight!

Jake
 

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Unfortunately, almost every trout has had worms, so if you like to keep what you catch (which I do), just be ready to throw a lot of filets away. I haven't caught any monsters this summer, but most are in the 16"-20" range.

Keep em' tight!

Jake
Please don't throw them away. They're perfectly safe to eat.

If you're going to throw them away, then just throw them back.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Unfortunately, almost every trout has had worms, so if you like to keep what you catch (which I do), just be ready to throw a lot of filets away. I haven't caught any monsters this summer, but most are in the 16"-20" range.

Keep em' tight!

Jake
Please don't throw them away. They're perfectly safe to eat.

If you're going to throw them away, then just throw them back.
I'm pretty good and cutting out the worms, but some are way too infested to even bother.

I've got a family of 6 to feed, so I'm bringing home everything I'm legally allowed to possess. I haven't frozen anything in years, because, at best, I have a little left over for lunch the next day after my minions get their fill. The good news (for the fish) is that they all get to go back after I put the first 5 in the cooler!
 

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Wolfgang
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Unfortunately, almost every trout has had worms, so if you like to keep what you catch (which I do), just be ready to throw a lot of filets away. I haven't caught any monsters this summer, but most are in the 16"-20" range.
Those worms just add protein value to the food. Nothing wrong at all.
Ever seen the worms in amberjack? You can jump rope with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Unfortunately, almost every trout has had worms, so if you like to keep what you catch (which I do), just be ready to throw a lot of filets away. I haven't caught any monsters this summer, but most are in the 16"-20" range.
Those worms just add protein value to the food. Nothing wrong at all.
Ever seen the worms in amberjack? You can jump rope with them.
I don't mind it, because cooking them kills everything, but the kids...that's a different story. Have you ever tried getting a 7 year old just to eat normal food? That can be difficult enough. Now let them find WORMS in their food!!! You'll never get them to eat anything ever again; haha!

Unfortunately, I've never landed a monster AJ, but I've heard they have some mondo worms in them. I guess the good thing about those is there is so much meat that there is still plenty left after you clean them out.
 

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I don't want to get all "lawyer" on ya, but there are laws in FL that actually make what you're doing illegal - if you are knowingly killing something that's legal to kill and then wasting it (by not consuming it or using it for something else like bait or whatever.)

So, you might not want to get on a public forum bragging about throwing away trout just because there's a few worms in it.

I understand your plight about picky kids as this is why neither of my kids were allowed to clean fish until they were older and had a better understanding of things.

Also, if you take the time to read this article:

http://www.nola.com/outdoors/index.ssf/2014/08/the_way_youre_handling_your_fi.html

and follow the author's advice then it WILL dramatically change the taste, appearance, and texture of your trout fillets. Also, since I started following the technique the author provides I've noticed far less worms in my trout fillets - I'm thinking that the worms don't like the cold and migrate to other parts of the fish that are warmer - so, when you clean the fish the worms don't end up in the fillets as much.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Look, man, I think it is a significant stretch to say I am "bragging" about wasting fish...I'm actually just bragging about catching them, just like every other fisherman on this forum.

The article you referenced was good. I've learned and utilized all of the exact same (and very helpful) tricks the author mentions over 30+ years of fishing with my dad and grandpa. I take very good care of my catch all the way through the cleaning process (I even have a stainless steel bowl with an ice slurry), but, due to the exact reason the author alludes to, I can't immediately clean them onboard my boat or the "man" will slap a fine on me. Kinda like putting stupid restrictions on law-abiding gun owners (oh, man, I may have just opened another...wait for it...can of worms...)

Also, unless I'm mistaken (I admit I don't know everything), it's pretty hard to determine if a fish has worms untill AFTER you cut it open. I frequently give extra fish to neighbors and friends, so please get off the blame train about having to discard a few hunks of meat due to SIGNIFICANT infestation (sounds really tasty, right?).

I initiated this thread to share tactics and techniques with other anglers...period. Let's just keep it at that and save the SJW stuff for Facebook.

Keep em' tight!

W16
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi Whiskey, I hear ya. I can't bring myself to eat worms, and I will not feed them to someone else..... Well, there might be some folks I would feed worms to!
I've eaten some gross things in my life, but intentionally putting something into my stomach, dead or alive, that isn't supposed to be there is tough to swallow...damn, another pun...
 

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Poecilancistrium caryophyllum

They are not worms, they are a parasite. Parasites are pretty much in any meat that you put on the table too. They might be too small to see, but they are there. Even in "clean" fillets - parasites, bacteria, and viruses are literally everywhere.

Parasites, bacteria, and viruses are on your skin, in your hair, and are even inside of YOU!!!!

You can read all about them here: http://www.seagrantfish.lsu.edu/resources/factsheets/spaghettiworms.htm

Interesting thing - research shows that trout with worms usually come from cleaner water whereas trout without worms usually come from dirtier water.

You're fear of eating these trout is irrational.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
They are not worms, they are a parasite. Parasites are pretty much in any meat that you put on the table too. They might be too small to see, but they are there. Even in "clean" fillets - parasites, bacteria, and viruses are literally everywhere.

Parasites, bacteria, and viruses are on your skin, in your hair, and are even inside of YOU!!!!

You can read all about them here: http://www.seagrantfish.lsu.edu/resources/factsheets/spaghettiworms.htm

Interesting thing - research shows that trout with worms usually come from cleaner water whereas trout without worms usually come from dirtier water.

You're fear of eating these trout is irrational.
Maybe I'm irrational; maybe I'm not, but now we're discussing eating MASSIVE parasites vs. eating worms. Either way, as Happy Gilmore would say: "That's pretty sick, Chubs!"
 

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Good morning, PFF! Now that the winds have finally started to die down it's time to head back on the water and tighten some lines. I've been absolutely wearing out the specks the last few weeks, but I'd really like to get back into some decent red action again.

For the longest time I couldn't buy a solid trout bite, but the reds were keeping me busy. Now I'll catch 20-30 specks and there isn't a red to be found (not even a rat)! Granted, I've been fishing a little bit different areas for the trout, but only because the usual areas that have held reds in the past have been unproductive.

If anyone would like to swap tactics (hence the title), I'd be happy to do so if it puts me on some of those pumpkins again! I'm talking time of day, tackle, depth, current, casting direction, retrieval, etc., that's how detailed I can be. be

I know I can go to the bridges at night and get into the bulls, but I'm more of an early morning guy who favors the topwater bite on the flats.

Take care,

Jake


Are you boat or bank fishing? I'm new to the area and looking to get on some trout. I don't have a boat


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Are you boat or bank fishing? I'm new to the area and looking to get on some trout. I don't have a boat


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Mostly from a kayak inshore, but I also have a boat I take offshore when conditions allow.

Fishing from the shore "wade fishing" is totally doable around here. You are obviously limited on how far out you can go and the speed at which you go there, but with a decent set up (PM me for what I use) you can still cover a lot of ground.

Coming from the Midwest, the saltwater game is completely different than fishing bass, bluegill, and crappie out of my aunt's lake on a jon boat. Tides, moon phase/angle, time of day/year, wind speed/direction, etc. all play a huge role. My favorite fishing is on the flats, so you will be having some fun. Don't get discouraged if you strike out the first few times; it's taken me a few years to get good-ish at it.

As a general rule in the summer/early fall, if you start just before sunrise and fish until about 0830-0900, or if you go just before sunset until it gets really dark, you will have the most luck. The two-hours prior to and after a tide shift are the best (lots of moving water), so if you can line the time of day up with the tides (current) you will have the most success. I prefer a Heddon One-Knocker Spook in Bone color (I don't think color matters though), because I can't get enough of the topwater explosions! Keep in mind, you will get a lot of misses on topwater, but to me it's worth it. Other options are an MR-17, weedless jig with a paddletail, live shrimp on a carolina rig, Rapala jerk shad (or equivalent), or a weedless gold spoon.

There are a TON of way better and far more experienced fisherman on this forum than me, but I'm always happy to spread the wealth when and where I can. Guys on the forum who have been helpful to me over the last couple of years are Barefoot, LimItOut (Josh), Grouper King, NLytle (yak forum mostly), and a lot of other guys who are more than happy to help newbies out.

Now, that being said, use the "search" function on the forum to pull up previous threads covering any of your questions before you ask a question that has been beaten to death over the years.

Good luck!

W16
 
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