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We hit the ramp at about noon and headed for the pass. We got through the pass and it was great, only about 1 to 2 foot waves. We headed about six miles out and ran 25 to 30 mph all the way there. Once we got to our spot, baited up and dropped, the waves were already getting bigger. We had not been there 30 minutes and the waves were 4 to 5 feet. We turned and headed back in (a very wet trip back from the waves), and we were back at the dock by 3pm. You know what they say.....a bad day fishing is better than a good day at work. AMEN!
 

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i was out 10 miles and it got bad the waves was 5 to 6 foot it was a slow ride in and a wet one but the fish bite was good.





later jeff
 

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That was the story for everyone yesterday. Including us. Great ride out only for it to turn bad quickly. It was amazing how quickly it went from smooth to 4' walls of water.:banghead
 

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I bet that their was alot of people in your shoes yesterday. We went oystering and it was beautiful but after 1:00 the south wind start blowing like hell. Made getting our oysters a real pain in the ass.
 

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Did you take your foul weather gear?



Foul weather gear is like an umbrella on land. If you take it with you, you won't need it. If you forget it, you spend that long, wet ride in thinking why did you spend the money to buy it, but then leave it at the house!



Glad yall got to wet some lines though.
 

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Yeah I was excited to get out this weekend but friday night NOAA's forecast got kicked up a notch and was calling for 3-5 footers, so instead of blowing 80 bucks on bait and gas I blew 200 bucks at outcast's sale...thats what I call financially responsible!!!
 

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I was caught in it yesterday too. Thank goodness I had curtains. For some odd reason I was hitting all of The big waves. Good test for me since I just bought a boat off of a member here. Just glad that everyone here made it safe back to the dock
 

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<DIV class=mainB>I was in it with my dad and Gone Fishin Too. We were out about 20 milesand ran in about 3PM. We estimated 4 footers also, but when I got home I looked at the buoy data, and it doesn't look like it got above 2 feet. This is from the NOAA buoy 12 miles south of OB.</DIV><DIV class=mainB></DIV><DIV class=mainB>Wave Detail Buoy Data for February 28, 2010</DIV><TABLE class="full dataTable" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><THEAD><TR><TD>Update Time:</TD><TD>Water Depth:</TD><TD>Wave Height:</TD><TD>Spectral Peak Period:</TD><TD>Average Wave Period:</TD><TD>Sampling Interval:</TD><TD>Wave Record:</TD></TR></THEAD><TBODY><TR><TD>20:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.54 ft</TD><TD>3.0 sec</TD><TD>3.0 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>21:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.51 ft</TD><TD>2.9 sec</TD><TD>2.9 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>22:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.67 ft</TD><TD>3.3 sec</TD><TD>3.0 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>01:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.82 ft</TD><TD>3.7 sec</TD><TD>3.5 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>02:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.69 ft</TD><TD>3.3 sec</TD><TD>3.5 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>03:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.76 ft</TD><TD>4.0 sec</TD><TD>3.5 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>04:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.59 ft</TD><TD>8.3 sec</TD><TD>3.8 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>06:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.03 ft</TD><TD>7.7 sec</TD><TD>4.2 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>07:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.90 ft</TD><TD>7.7 sec</TD><TD>4.2 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>08:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.87 ft</TD><TD>7.1 sec</TD><TD>3.7 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>09:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.71 ft</TD><TD>8.3 sec</TD><TD>3.6 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>10:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.87 ft</TD><TD>7.7 sec</TD><TD>3.6 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>11:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.97 ft</TD><TD>8.3 sec</TD><TD>3.6 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>12:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.17 ft</TD><TD>3.7 sec</TD><TD>3.8 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>13:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.97 ft</TD><TD>7.7 sec</TD><TD>3.9 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>14:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.87 ft</TD><TD>7.1 sec</TD><TD>4.0 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>15:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.94 ft</TD><TD>7.1 sec</TD><TD>3.6 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>16:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.00 ft</TD><TD>6.7 sec</TD><TD>3.5 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>17:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.00 ft</TD><TD>3.0 sec</TD><TD>3.5 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>18:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.03 ft</TD><TD>7.1 sec</TD><TD>3.6 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>19:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.07 ft</TD><TD>3.6 sec</TD><TD>3.5 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>21:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>2.00 ft</TD><TD>3.1 sec</TD><TD>3.4 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>00:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.61 ft</TD><TD>3.4 sec</TD><TD>3.5 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>01:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.51 ft</TD><TD>3.2 sec</TD><TD>3.5 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>02:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.38 ft</TD><TD>7.1 sec</TD><TD>3.6 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>2400 sec</TD></TR><TR><TD>03:00</TD><TD>85 ft</TD><TD>1.41 ft</TD><TD>8.3 sec</TD><TD>4.0 sec</TD><TD>0.6 sec</TD><TD>

2400 sec</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

So are we all crazy, and it was really 2ft seas out there? Or is the buoy inaccurate? Could conditions really have been that different a few miles west? It sure felt like a pounding I would not have gotten in typical 2ft seas.
 

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The bouy is good to use but not always as accurate as to where you are. 10 miles east or west or north and southcan make a huge difference. The bouy heighs are and average. If it's 2.6 ft you can bet there's some 3-4's every now and then. If it say 3' you can count on seeing some 4's and an occasional 5.
 

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Aren't waves measured from the middle to the peak or trough? Not from peak to trough like a boat experiences? So 2ft buoy reading feels and looks like a 4 ft wall of water? Kind of like measuring waves on the beach, measured from the back of the wave, but who rides the back of the wave, you surf the front and a 2 ft wave looks 4 ft when facing it! I don't know, I'm guessing, where's NOAA and their explanation? Who are these guys? Questions, questions.



Just found the description, talk about job security!!



How are spectral wave data derived from buoy motion measurements?

NDBC-reported wave measurements are not directly measured by sensors on board the buoys. Instead, the accelerometers or inclinometers on board the buoys measure the heave acceleration or the vertical displacement of the buoy hull during the wave acquisition time. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is applied to the data by the processor on board the buoy to transform the data from the temporal domain into the frequency domain. Note that the raw acceleration or displacement measurements are not transmitted shore-side. Response amplitude operator (RAO) processing is then performed on the transformed data to account for both hull and electronic noise. It is from this transformation that non-directional spectral wave measurements (i.e., wave energies with their associated frequencies) are derived. Along with the spectral energies, measurements such as significant wave height (WVHGT), average wave period (AVGPD), and dominant period (DOMPD) are also derived from the transformation.



Note that the wave measurements contained in the SeaBreeze CD-ROM only include calculations of WVHGT, AVGPD, and DOMPD. To receive spectral wave energy density data, see the Web page about obtaining archived data



For a more detailed explanation on FFT's, see

Brigham, E.O., 1988: The Fast Fourier Transform and its Applications. Prentiss Hall International, 448 pp.





For a detailed description on the applications of Fast Fourier Transforms to wave data, see

Tucker, M.J., 1991: Waves in Ocean Engineering: Measurement, Analysis, and Interpretation. Ellis Horwood, LTD., 431 pp.





For more information about NDBC's wave measuring systems, refer to:

Steele, K.E. and T.R. Mettlach, 1993: NDBC wave data - current and planned. Ocean Wave Measurement and Analysis - Proceedings of the Second International Symposium. ASCE, 198-207.





NDBC also reports directional wave data for selected stations. Besides buoy heave acceleration, measurements of hull azimuth, pitch, and roll are also necessary for directional waves. Two methods exist for the measurement of hull azimuth, pitch, and roll.



The first method includes the use of a Datawell Hippy sensor to measure vertical heave acceleration along with pitch and roll. A second sensor, a triaxial magnetometer, is used to measure hull azimuth.



For a more detailed description, refer to:

Steele, K.E., Teng, C-C., and D. W-C. Wang, 1992: Wave direction measurements using pitch and roll buoys. Ocean Engineering, 19, 4, 349-375.



The second method uses only the triaxial magnetometer to measure hull azimuth, pitch, and roll. Vertical heave acceleration is measured by an accelerometer.



For more information, refer to

Steele, K.E. and M. Earle, 1991: Directional ocean wave spectra using buoy azimuth, pitch, and roll derived from magnetic field components. IEEE Journal of Ocean Engineering, 16, 4, 427-433.



The processing stream as applied to raw, directional measurements is similar to that presented above for non-directional data: RAO's are applied to the acceleration data after all Fourier processing is performed. The main difference between directional and the non-directional wave data is that, for directional data, four frequency-dependent parameters are calculated along with the spectral measurements, WVHGT, AVGPD, and DOMPD. These other parameters are ALPHA1 (mean wave direction), ALPHA2 (principle wave direction), and R1 and R2 (parameters which describe the directional spreading about the main direction).





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We were out all day, 60 miles south of Mobile bay. Never got over 3'. Some people don't realize that the waves do stack on top of each other so in 2' seas you will always have a few 4 footers if you are in the right place when two come together. Yesterday was a mixed chop all day that is always a little nasty to run in especially in a mono hull boat.
 
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