Pensacola Fishing Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is my second year bow hunting, and my wifes first (missed a doe last year) I misjudged the distance on my first deer last year and shot over her back. I've been reading and watching youtube videos trying to learn all i can about shot placement, range estimation, bow tuning, etc.. but I am sure we have some people on here with comparable knowledge that could share small tips and tricks the rest of us might not know. I feel pretty comfortable at 20 yrds after sighting in, and french tuning my bow, but past 30 i seem to shake quite a bit (i have a bad shoulder from the army) at any rate I am just trying to learn all I can to help my wife and I become better hunters.
Thanks in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,665 Posts
Practice the longer shots. To get good at twenty practice at thirty. To get good at thirty practice at thirty five. What skull said about aiming low sounds dumb but experience shows that when your excited you will shoot high. I think you may have already learned that lesson. Bow hunting is supposed to be fun. Don't overthink it. Have fun!

Sent from my iPhone using Forum Runner
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the tip Skull you are right I did not know to bend at the waist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
I don't shoot past 20 yds, always been my rule, practice out of a stand at the height of shootin stand, practice with what bradheads u plan to hunt with. listen to your draw, make sure you shoot quality sites ,rest arrows broadheads...practice, practice , practice...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
Duplicate the tree stand "hunting shot" in a practice shooting environment.
- Know the distance ( range finders are fairly inexpensive)
- Bend at the waist when shooting from an elevated tree stand.
- ALWAYS practice before going hunting with a broad head since your arrow flight will usually be different than field point flight especially in most fixed broad heads.
- SHARP - SHARP- broad heads.
Don't get down quickly after making a shot. IF you used sharp broad heads, the hemorrhaging will occur and the deer will bleed out. If possible, use binoculars from your stand to see what the blood looks like on the arrow. (I like to use white or light colored fletching for this purpose)
But most important of all, wear a safety harness.
It's a rush, go get 'em.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,151 Posts
when shooting from a treestand , aim "where the hair meets the air" (aim low)
HUH???:001_huh:

Shooting from ground is totally different then the stand...Placement is key, if you aim at vitals from a tree you'll mess up the shot. Shoot the top of the vitals so the arrow will penetrate both sides. Quartering shots are the same with having to shoot the back or front top of the vitals.

Distance can be done w/ a rangefinder or stepping off distances and making a landmark. Some folks use ribbon/tape, but I'm a decent judge so I don't use anything...

Be careful wearing baggy clothes especially on the arm holding the bow. I have a leaf suit that has a couple leaves missing...;)

Always carry a couple critter arrows when in the stand. Tank opossums are good practice. Also if you shoot at a deer, if you miss, hold on cause many times they will come back. If you hit the deer, give it a minimum 20-30 minutes unless you see it go down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,677 Posts
I cheat by;

* practicing from the stand I'm actually hunting from.

* I get a buddy to stand by while I climb into stand and use my range finder and put out little signs with distance. I do the same with long range shots with rifle.

*Shoot from the stand while my buddy retrieves the arrows.

*A deer target is always good to use if your budget can stand it.

Things that will cause the hunt to end badly for you, squeaky stands and bows. You may not hear them while practicing, but you and every deer in the woods will when you draw back on a deer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,632 Posts
All of this aim low, bend at the waist, etc etc might work for some but if you get a 3d deer target and shoot at it from an elevated stand with broadheads, it will tell you all YOU need to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Some good advice...can't say it enough, bend at the waist.

For the 30 yard shakes...I don't know what your setup is but...A functional stabilizer will tighten your groups at longer distances...one such as the Bee Stinger Pro Hunter...the weight is at the end of the stabilizer, I would use at least 8oz weight and 10".

Sight: Center your sight ring in your peep, not your pin...people will disagree, but here is the reasoning...you can't center your 20yd pin with same anchor point and bow arm position as your 30yd pin. You can center you sight ring and by bending forward or back at the waist maintain the same anchor point and bow arm position...everything is the same, making you consistent and more accurate....

Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Man these are great! Please keep them coming.. my aim point should be about 2-3" behind the front shoulder right?
To go for a double lung.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,115 Posts
Practice at longer ranges than you will need to shoot while hunting. Started doing this last year. It's incredible how much of a difference it makes for your close game.

One I think a lot of people forget: draw your bow from every position you may shoot from in the stand. It's easy to miss a branch or something while trimming, and it's not fun to slam an elbow into it while drawing.
 

·
PFF Official Referee
Joined
·
5,244 Posts
Some good advice...can't say it enough, bend at the waist.

Sight: Center your sight ring in your peep, not your pin...people will disagree, but here is the reasoning...you can't center your 20yd pin with same anchor point and bow arm position as your 30yd pin. You can center you sight ring and by bending forward or back at the waist maintain the same anchor point and bow arm position...everything is the same, making you consistent and more accurate....

Good luck
Exactly! That is why a lot of people shoot low at further distances!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,406 Posts
Man these are great! Please keep them coming.. my aim point should be about 2-3" behind the front shoulder right?
To go for a double lung.
----------------------------------------------------------------
You started a fire on this one........................
IF you are a Chuck Adams, Waddell , or a "Dead Eye Dick" you could walk up the back line of the front leg and "Bingo".
Unfortunately, many things can and do happen when releasing an arrow. I shoot "center mass" , meaning I pick a spot in the middle of the region that encompasses the heart , liver and lungs.
It gives you about a 3" allowance for "things" that happen, and it has worked very well for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,391 Posts
Relax your grip on the bow, a death grip will cause erratic (not erotic) arrow flight. At least it did for me when I started.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
What I do is sight my bow in slightly low maybe 2"-2.5" the reason is that when hunting from an elevated stand it counter acts the force a gravity (slightly)on the arrow thus taking the arc out of the shot that you would see when shooting from a level plain and if the deer jumps the sting it will still hit the spine or vital artery(happen to me last year). As far as the shaking try this, instead of holding steady on one spot of the target aim slightly low and slowly raise your pin into the area you want to hit then release when you get to that spot . It will take pratice but it works for me
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,948 Posts
"Float the pin" Unless you are a robot, you cannot hold the pin perfectly steady on the spot you want to hit, so most will find themselves trying to jerk the release trigger whenever the pin crosses the target. Instead, hold the pin over the desired point of impact and just kinda make a small circular motion while squeezing the trigger. With your mind on the "float", the release will go off smoothly.

"Aim small, miss small" Don't shoot at the deer. Shoot at a hair on the deer. The sweet spot is just behind the "elbow" of the front leg. Hit a little low and you tag the heart....hit a little high and you double lung.

Watch the arrow hit the target while looking through the sight after release. Don't lift or tilt you head to look around the bow after the release.

Lastly, get a sight with a level on it so you don't torque your bow during the shot.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top