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Use the smallest treble hook (preferably black) you can find with live shrimp hooked under the horn. Free line the shrimp with 10-12# mono, no flouro, weights or swivels needed. Or use a popping cork with 10-12# flouro and same treble hook. No added weights or swivels. Use a weighted popping cork if you have to.
The shrimp wants to swim and you should encourage that.
Can't use treble hooks with live or dead bait fishing for specks or redfish in Florida, Rick.
 

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Use the smallest treble hook (preferably black) you can find with live shrimp hooked under the horn. Free line the shrimp with 10-12# mono, no flouro, weights or swivels needed. Or use a popping cork with 10-12# flouro and same treble hook. No added weights or swivels. Use a weighted popping cork if you have to.
The shrimp wants to swim and you should encourage that.
You’re not allowed to use a treble with live bait inshore in Florida, it has to be a single hook. Red Drum (Redfish)
I agree with above, scale down the size of your tackle to a size 1 or 2 hook and 8-12# floro leader, if you can learn a good knot for braid to line that will go a long way as well, there’s a few, Albright, Alberto, uni, pick one and master it. Don’t be afraid to free-line a live bait with as little tackle as possible. Buy and learn to use a small cast net, 6’ is ok, no smaller, YouTube is your friend for learning. Good live bait is always a bonus. Make reports here, you’ll catch some shit for posting trips with not much to show, but you’ll get some good advice too, read as much as you can from years past in the inshore section, scroll back and find reports from the time of year you’re fishing. Keep a fishing journal, write down trips and as you succeed more you’ll be able to go back and reference your own information for the future. Finally, enjoy the process, you’re fishing where people pay good money to come from all over to fish, try new spots, move around and take it in. Good luck.
 
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Discussion Starter #23
Use the smallest treble hook (preferably black) you can find with live shrimp hooked under the horn. Free line the shrimp with 10-12# mono, no flouro, weights or swivels needed. Or use a popping cork with 10-12# flouro and same treble hook. No added weights or swivels. Use a weighted popping cork if you have to.
The shrimp wants to swim and you should encourage that.
thanks man! I actually saw a video last night explaining the importance of letting the shrimp swim around rather than keeping him tight under the cork.

Is there any benefit to mono over flouro? I read about 5 different articles last night and every one said something different about the same line, like mono has more stretch and then vice versa. I was kind of bewildered by it to be honest.

My general line of thinking on it was this: flouro is better as far being less visible, but more susceptible to abrasion than mono.

Am I on the right track there or no?
 

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You’re not allowed to use a treble with live bait inshore in Florida, it has to be a single hook. Red Drum (Redfish)
I agree with above, scale down the size of your tackle to a size 1 or 2 hook and 8-12# floro leader, if you can learn a good knot for braid to line that will go a long way as well, there’s a few, Albright, Alberto, uni, pick one and master it. Don’t be afraid to free-line a live bait with as little tackle as possible. Buy and learn to use a small cast net, 6’ is ok, no smaller, YouTube is your friend for learning. Good live bait is always a bonus. Make reports here, you’ll catch some shit for posting trips with not much to show, but you’ll get some good advice too, read as much as you can from years past in the inshore section, scroll back and find reports from the time of year you’re fishing. Keep a fishing journal, write down trips and as you succeed more you’ll be able to go back and reference your own information for the future. Finally, enjoy the process, you’re fishing where people pay good money to come from all over to fish, try new spots, move around and take it in. Good
You’re not allowed to use a treble with live bait inshore in Florida, it has to be a single hook. Red Drum (Redfish)
I agree with above, scale down the size of your tackle to a size 1 or 2 hook and 8-12# floro leader, if you can learn a good knot for braid to line that will go a long way as well, there’s a few, Albright, Alberto, uni, pick one and master it. Don’t be afraid to free-line a live bait with as little tackle as possible. Buy and learn to use a small cast net, 6’ is ok, no smaller, YouTube is your friend for learning. Good live bait is always a bonus. Make reports here, you’ll catch some shit for posting trips with not much to show, but you’ll get some good advice too, read as much as you can from years past in the inshore section, scroll back and find reports from the time of year you’re fishing. Keep a fishing journal, write down trips and as you succeed more you’ll be able to go back and reference your own information for the future. Finally, enjoy the process, you’re fishing where people pay good money to come from all over to fish, try new spots, move around and take it in. Good luck.
Love that journal idea!
 

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Jaded Old Phart
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Sounds like you might have to find new areas and probably have to start wading. The juvenile fish you're looking for would have taken a swipe at your offerings.
I have some articles that should help you, their too big to copy and paste here but if you message me thru this forum (conversations) and give me your e mail, I can send them to you.
Here's a snippet:



FALL FACTS ABOUT FLATS
When fishing flats this fall, keep these facts and suggestions in mind:
1 Most of the better flats in the fall will be in less than 4 feet of water.
2 Keep in mind that shallow fish are usually active fish and are really aggressive when it comes to taking artificials.
3 Since water temperatures are gradually dropping, an indicator for me that the flats are heating up is when water temperatures first get down into the mid-70s again.
4 When a tide is rising across a flat, the fish are usually more scattered and are sometimes found along shallower ridges or humps on the flat.
5 If the tide is falling, you “fall back” to the edge along the contour drop if possible. This is where the quality fish will be.
6 Grass flats or patches of scattered grass will hold enormous amounts of bait and white shrimp and are some of the best places to fish in the fall.
7 Grassy areas are usually clearer than oyster bottoms because the grass actually filters the water. This is something to consider on windy days when a “blue-northern” comes crashing through.
8 I’ve had some memorable days when fishing flats with top-waters in the fall months, especially if the water is relatively clean and the skies are cloudy.
9 As far as the tides go, the last two hours before high tide and the first few after is absolutely the best time to be situated on active fish.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Sounds like you might have to find new areas and probably have to start wading. The juvenile fish you're looking for would have taken a swipe at your offerings.
I have some articles that should help you, their too big to copy and paste here but if you message me thru this forum (conversations) and give me your e mail, I can send them to you.
Here's a snippet:



FALL FACTS ABOUT FLATS
When fishing flats this fall, keep these facts and suggestions in mind:
1 Most of the better flats in the fall will be in less than 4 feet of water.
2 Keep in mind that shallow fish are usually active fish and are really aggressive when it comes to taking artificials.
3 Since water temperatures are gradually dropping, an indicator for me that the flats are heating up is when water temperatures first get down into the mid-70s again.
4 When a tide is rising across a flat, the fish are usually more scattered and are sometimes found along shallower ridges or humps on the flat.
5 If the tide is falling, you “fall back” to the edge along the contour drop if possible. This is where the quality fish will be.
6 Grass flats or patches of scattered grass will hold enormous amounts of bait and white shrimp and are some of the best places to fish in the fall.
7 Grassy areas are usually clearer than oyster bottoms because the grass actually filters the water. This is something to consider on windy days when a “blue-northern” comes crashing through.
8 I’ve had some memorable days when fishing flats with top-waters in the fall months, especially if the water is relatively clean and the skies are cloudy.
9 As far as the tides go, the last two hours before high tide and the first few after is absolutely the best time to be situated on active fish.
Well that’s fortunate, cause I just bought a new pair of waders last week! I’ll get my email to you shortly.
 

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Sorry about the treble hook ya'll, I had no idea. They are legal here, sold right beside the shrimp tank. :D
I guess the point I was getting at was using as little tackle as possible with a live bait.
 

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Jaded Old Phart
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Well that’s fortunate, cause I just bought a new pair of waders last week! I’ll get my email to you shortly.
Great! Now you can wade around/under the docks and be like this happy camper.

1073564
 

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I feel like this was just a plug for the other website for newbies learning how to fish. If not, lighten your leader and run a smaller hook. Small hooks catch big fish just the same but big hooks don’t normally catch smaller fish. Keep fishing and figure out what works. Also target the species that are running. You’re not going to catch specks flounder reds from your same spot 365 days out of the year and if you do please PM me your spot.
 
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I feel like this was just a plug for the other website for newbies learning how to fish. If not, lighten your leader and run a smaller hook. Small hooks catch big fish just the same but big hooks don’t normally catch smaller fish. Keep fishing and figure out what works. Also target the species that are running. You’re not going to catch specks flounder reds from your same spot 365 days out of the year and if you do please PM me your spot.
Haha, I promise this isn’t any sort of ad. But honestly man, some friends came down from Birmingham today for a day of fishing, and I rigged everything up with wayyy lighter tackle like you and a lot of others suggested and we had the best day since we started this inshore stuff earlier this year

Caught a ton of dink reds, a really nice upper slot red, and a handful of specks and mangroves. It felt good to finally be able to consistently hook up on fish when we were able to find them, and I really think it was because I went with smaller gear.
 

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Haha, I promise this isn’t any sort of ad. But honestly man, some friends came down from Birmingham today for a day of fishing, and I rigged everything up with wayyy lighter tackle like you and a lot of others suggested and we had the best day since we started this inshore stuff earlier this year

Caught a ton of dink reds, a really nice upper slot red, and a handful of specks and mangroves. It felt good to finally be able to consistently hook up on fish when we were able to find them, and I really think it was because I went with smaller gear.
Write it down, where, date, time, tide, bait, moon, weather, who was with you, anything else of note, you’ll look back later and be glad you did.
 

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Write it down, where, date, time, tide, bait, moon, weather, who was with you, anything else of note, you’ll look back later and be glad you did.
Keeping notes helps tremendously when you are starting out

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 
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