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Going sunday , see if we can't pick up a wahoo or 2 ... going to try the nipple and fish the transition . maybe find some grass or a rip . black fin are always welcome ,may drag a couple of cedar plugs . will report what ever we run into .... has anybody seen any blue water ????:thumbsup:
 

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blue water

look at the post "nice line" and you will see what i am talking about , its usually a salinity and temperature brake caused by an up whelling or current and gulf stream changes ... i think:thumbup:
 

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I'm kind of a rookie at this saltwater thing, what do you mean by "blue water"?
Once your in it you will know. When i have newbies on my boat they ask the same thing. I wont explain it to them, just tell them to tell me when they think we are in it. As soon as we cross that line they know.
 

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Bluewater

I'm kind of a rookie at this saltwater thing, what do you mean by "blue water"?
The higher the oxygen content in water, the bluer the water. If you have ever been to the Bahamas you see blue water everywhere, there are not rivers to my knowledge in the Bahamas; therefore, little freshwater.

Tuna and billfish require enormous amounts of oxygen; therefore, they prefer bluewater.

Usually, if good bluewater moves in for a while, the fish will follow the bait into the northern gulf and if the water green's up, the fish will hang around for a while because they have found good sources of bait.

This year, we never really got the big push of bluewater, probably due to all the flooding out of the MS River.

Hopefully, we will get a good bluewater push into our area before the season is over
 

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Good explaination

The higher the oxygen content in water, the bluer the water. If you have ever been to the Bahamas you see blue water everywhere, there are not rivers to my knowledge in the Bahamas; therefore, little freshwater.

Tuna and billfish require enormous amounts of oxygen; therefore, they prefer bluewater.

Usually, if good bluewater moves in for a while, the fish will follow the bait into the northern gulf and if the water green's up, the fish will hang around for a while because they have found good sources of bait.

This year, we never really got the big push of bluewater, probably due to all the flooding out of the MS River.

Hopefully, we will get a good bluewater push into our area before the season is over
nice explaination:thumbsup:
 
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