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https://www.westernjournal.com/ct/california-goes-off-deep-end-inmates-gain-right-possess-marijuana-prison/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=conservativetribune&utm_content=2019-06-14&utm_campaign=manualpost&fbclid=IwAR11KKmpxBpE9wvpKcicxubs1V3iSWFJDRa6vZo9XQ7wf7UHhrjJKil8cAw



California’s nickname has long been “The Golden State,” but it might be time to re-name it “The Land of Unintended Consequences.”

The increasingly liberal state has already run into problems with its past choices, many of which seem great on paper — to the left, at least — until they’re actually put into practice.

Sanctuary policies are a good example: They made west coast liberals feel good but lead to rampant homelessness and poverty.

Now, yet another bright idea out of California is having unintended consequences. A court in the state has just ruled that the 2016 recreational marijuana law passed there applies to everyone, meaning that even prison inmates must be legally allowed to possess pot.

“The 3rd District Court of Appeal’s 20-page ruling says the state’s voters legalized recreational possession of less than an ounce of cannabis in 2016, with no exception — even for those behind bars,” Fox News reported on Friday.

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That’s good news for one group: prisoners who were facing added jail time because they got caught with drugs in the joint, if you’ll pardon the pun.

“The decision Tuesday overturned the Sacramento County convictions of five inmates who’d been found with marijuana in their prison cells,” Fox News continued.

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The legal landscape around marijuana was already a mess, but it’s even more convoluted for people who are serving time. California’s cannabis law neglected to prohibit possession by inmates, and one of the core judicial concepts in America is that anything not prohibited is de facto legal.

“According to the plain language of…Proposition 64, possession of less than an ounce of cannabis in prison is no longer a felony,” wrote the court panel of three judges who ruled on the issue.

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But it gets complicated. “Smoking or ingesting cannabis in prison remains a felony,” they added.

In other words: Marijuana is federally illegal, but legal in California, including in prison, but illegal to actually consume behind bars. Are you taking notes?

As if the issue wasn’t murky enough, authorities also say that prisons can make it a rules violation to possess marijuana, just like other contraband. So a prisoner with a joint may still face prison-level consequences, but effectively can’t be charged with a new crime.

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Jaded Old Phart
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https://hannity.com/media-room/report-california-poised-to-allow-felons-to-serve-on-juries-throughout-the-state/


California is poised to allow convicted felons to serve on juries; a controversial move that would permit those with criminal records to decide the fate of their peers in courtrooms across the state.

“SB310 will help ensure that California juries represent a fair cross-section of our communities…People with felony records have the right to vote in California. There is no legitimate reason why they should be barred from serving on a jury,” said state Sen. Nancy Skinner of Berkeley.
 

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Praedator
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Criminals loose rights all the time in prison! Their right to be free is the big one! Why shouldn't it be any different for this! Just another liberal judge legislating from the bench.
 

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"We will destroy you from within."

I think it was Kruschev that said that.

One thread at a time, destroying the fabric of our society.
 

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Criminals loose rights all the time in prison! Their right to be free is the big one! Why shouldn't it be any different for this! Just another liberal judge legislating from the bench.
Yes, but prisoners have more rights then a free man. Working around them everyday gives you a new attitude on them.

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California is also going to give Medicaid to illegals...but only the young working age illegals...not the kids or old people. Federal tax money to pay for this. Sheesh.
 

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Jaded Old Phart
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On the brighter side, maybe this will take care of the state:

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2019/03/typhus-tuberculosis-medieval-diseases-spreading-homeless/584380/

Medieval Diseases Are Infecting California’s Homeless
Typhus, tuberculosis, and other illnesses are spreading quickly through camps and shelters.

Infectious diseases—some that ravaged populations in the Middle Ages—are resurging in California and around the country, and are hitting homeless populations especially hard.

Los Angeles recently experienced an outbreak of typhus—a disease spread by infected fleas on rats and other animals—in downtown streets. Officials briefly closed part of City Hall after reporting that rodents had invaded the building.

People in Washington State have been infected with Shigella bacteria, which is spread through feces and causes the diarrheal disease shigellosis, as well as Bartonella quintana, or trench fever, which spreads through body lice.*
 

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Jaded Old Phart
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More joy from Cali. :mad:

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/california-farmers-furious-payments-high-speed-rail

Farmers up and down California’s Central Valley are up in arms over the state seizing their land to build its long-awaited high-speed railway and then failing to pay the hundreds of thousands of dollars owed them for years.

Thanks to an order of possession by the Superior Court, California can take private land through eminent domain for the troubled bullet train project. While landowners are expected to eventually be reimbursed for the property – and for expenses like lost farming production, irrigation replacement projects and road construction – many farmers in California’s agricultural heartland say state officials have offered them a myriad of excuses as to why they haven’t yet doled out the cash.
 
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