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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where can you get these? I thought the universities did em? Figured I would ask before I start my search. I want to plant dome Iron Clay Cow Peas about April? This would be the first year planting a summer plot. But I am aiming to keep them on our 153 instead of venturing off through out the year??

Any ideas or tips greatly appreciated!
 

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Escambia County Extension offers soil testing kits that you may pick up Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. You will then collect soil from the area you wish to test and submit it with the soil testing form, http://escambia.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/Landscape_Testing_Form.pdf, to the University of Florida (UF) in Gainesville. The cost per sample is either $3.00 for just the pH or $7.00 for the pH and nutrient analysis. In 7-10 days, the UF soil lab will send you a detailed analysis of your soil with recommendations. You may then call or email Escambia County Extension for any assistance in the analysis interpretation or for further recommendations. Hope this helps
 

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Jason, one tip I will give you, if you are going to plant Clay Peas, plant a plot that is at least 1 1/2 acres. The deer will mow down a smaller plot before the plants get to the point where they can sustain the deer's browsing. I have seen a 1/2 acre plot absolutely demolished in one night once the deer found it.
 

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Jason, one tip I will give you, if you are going to plant Clay Peas, plant a plot that is at least 1 1/2 acres. The deer will mow down a smaller plot before the plants get to the point where they can sustain the deer's browsing. I have seen a 1/2 acre plot absolutely demolished in one night once the deer found it.



Or plant soybeans and a cover crop like sorghum. The sorghum will mature faster, giving deer something to graze on so that the soybeans can reach maturity without being wiped out. Auburn does the soil samples as well.


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Jaster, You can pick up the kit and instructions in Milton, at the county extension agent @ 6263 Dogwood Drive in Milton. It takes about a week and you get the results by email.
 

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Jason, one tip I will give you, if you are going to plant Clay Peas, plant a plot that is at least 1 1/2 acres. The deer will mow down a smaller plot before the plants get to the point where they can sustain the deer's browsing. I have seen a 1/2 acre plot absolutely demolished in one night once the deer found it.
Browse pressure is also dependent on density and other available sources of food. Last year I planted some very small plots of Lablab, iron and clay, alyce clover, and deer vetch and it was not hit until late in the summer and even then it was never hammered. With all the rain we have had over the past two years it has kept the surrounding forests lush and the fall acorns plentiful during some of the typically lean parts of the year which can put less stress on summer and early fall plots.


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Any of the land grant universities in the region can help with it....UF, auburn, UGA, Mississippi state. Also your county extension office could provide information. Also mossy oak does it for a price and the provide you with a very detailed report as I am sure the others do as well.


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Yup slide by the county extension office up on 89 right before it joins back to 87. The stuff is free then cost about 10-15 bucks when you send it in

somewhere in a tree
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I turn around infront of the one on 89 near about every day. Will have to swing by. Thanks for the tips. Plot is atleast 1.25 acres. Seems to grow every year since I always take a row or 2 down while making the first pass. But I have a lush plot which did not get mowed bad, but had the most pictures in it. It is half acre or less. Our big one got mowed some, but edges are still pretty green as to where the middle is shorter and turning brown. Then the bow spot in the woods, got mowed over night once it got 4-5 inches high. But was only 200 sq ft!

Planted buck forage oats and a blend of crimson clover, and Rape. Spent a few extra dollars on seed this year and was impressed with how well it came up and stayed green all season. I want to draw them in and give them no reason to leave our 150 acres. But that is just a hope!!! Lol
 

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Do your IC Peas for the summer, then this fall, go with a Wrens Abruzzi rye mixed with some Durana Clover. In the spring, let the rye die down while the clover comes up and feeds the deer all year with just a little mowing maintenance. Our Durana plots are in their 3rd year this summer...pretty incredible stuff.

This is a 1 acre plot that they mowed down the rye all winter, but you can see the carpet of clover still going strong!

For soil samples, I get the bags and box from the local Ag co-op and send to UF Soil Lab. About $7 a sample and you can get 4 samples in a box. You can choose on the sample which crop you want to grow and it will tell you the pH you need, and N-P-K.

http://soilslab.ifas.ufl.edu/ESTL Home.asp
 

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Bcb,

I know you have talked a lot about that durana but how well does it hold up to this florida panhandle heat as spring progresses into summer.....seeing that durana is classified as a cool season plant?


I'm just curious because I usually go with alyce clover in a summer mixture because it seems to hold up okay on some of my more hot and sandy areas and it is a warm season clover.


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Not sure about Durana being a cool season plant. ?? It was developed in Georgia specifically to be drought tolerant and withstand the abuse of cattle in a pasture.
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Durana+the+whole+truth

The August 2014 picture shows the Durana doing well in the summer heat. The October 2014 picture with the tractor shows me discing my rye seed into the clover for the fall attractant. Pic is correct except for the 118 degrees...I think it was only 100 degrees that day!
 

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Yeah it's a cool season. Pretty much all the white clover varieties are cool season. Some varieties will carry over into the warmer months given the right conditions as you mentioned. Moisture retention is my greatest challenge. It's my understanding that the reason durana does so well is that with proper establishment it puts down a deep root system that allows it to withstand drought conditions. The key is establishment. I have areas on my property that are powder dry literally hours after a heavy rain.


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