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Discussion Starter #1
First of all, I’m just looking for information and not trying to do a trip until I’m ready and experienced enough.

With that said, I’m looking for some advice.
Would a 25’ Century Walk around with a 150 gallon tank and 250 suki be able to make that trip in your opinion?

Do you leave the engine running at all times or can you tie up to the rigs?

Always someone awake and on watch? I’m assuming this is a stupid question and of course you’ll want someone awake at all times.

We have all the CG safety equip plus a go bag, sat phone, floats and life vests.

Would you recommend anything else safety wise?

Thank you for all the input as always.
 

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See below responses..


First of all, I’m just looking for information and not trying to do a trip until I’m ready and experienced enough.

With that said, I’m looking for some advice.
Would a 25’ Century Walk around with a 150 gallon tank and 250 suki be able to make that trip in your opinion? Yes, but buddy boat a few times... Pick the best weather days.... study the weather close....

Do you leave the engine running at all times or can you tie up to the rigs? I alternate (twins) but if there isn't any current and i'm over the fish, I shut them down, not advisable to tie up to the rig...

Always someone awake and on watch? I’m assuming this is a stupid question and of course you’ll want someone awake at all times. pull off the rig a mile or so, shut down take turns napping

We have all the CG safety equip plus a go bag, sat phone, floats and life vests.

Would you recommend anything else safety wise? I take two (2) battery jumper packs with me. Just in case the batteries die....

Thank you for all the input as always.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for that. Makes me feel a lot better and I will definitely get some battery jump packs.

So, people normally go out later the first day and stay all night then come back the following day at some point correct? Is this because tuna turn on more at night?
 

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Thank you for that. Makes me feel a lot better and I will definitely get some battery jump packs.

So, people normally go out later the first day and stay all night then come back the following day at some point correct? Is this because tuna turn on more at night?

Yes, I mostly leave Pensacola about 12-1 in the afternoon, 4 hour or so ride out (stop on a few spots in route) this way you have time to jump from rig to rig and figure which one you want to call home for the evening bite. The Tuna are most always there, however, during the day, I have found them to be deeper. the lights of the rigs seen to bring them up to the surface (or not so dang deep) after the bait. They can be caught most all the time, but I've had best success evening, and some in the early early morning. during the dark hours...
 

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Yes, I mostly leave Pensacola about 12-1 in the afternoon, 4 hour or so ride out (stop on a few spots in route) this way you have time to jump from rig to rig and figure which one you want to call home for the evening bite. The Tuna are most always there, however, during the day, I have found them to be deeper. the lights of the rigs seen to bring them up to the surface (or not so dang deep) after the bait. They can be caught most all the time, but I've had best success evening, and some in the early early morning. during the dark hours...
Okay, that makes sense about the lights pulling them up. What baits do you guys use out that far? Would pinfish, cigs, hardtails still be the best out that far? Thats what we use and do well with at the edge.
 

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Hardtails, cigs, hering all work. Chunk bonita or blackfin, all types of jigs. Trolled Yummee Flyers and naked ballyhoo all produce.
 

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some suggestions for overnight trips from someone who's been on 10 or 15 out of Texas for tuna at our rigs.
Get some sleep. Take turns on the way out and back to take an hour or two nap. It'll be easier when you get back to the dock when it comes to cleaning fish/the boat etc. Take what you need but there's no need for everyone on board to bring 10 rods/reels. Bring what you'll use. Room on most boats is at a premium. Bring an extra set of clothing on the boat plus another set in your vehicle for the way home. Test all drags/knots at home before you leave. Bring plenty of ice. There's nothing worse than running low on ice when you have valuable tuna in the boat. Make a trip plan and stick to it. Let your wife/friends know where you'll be and approximately when you'll return. Fuel should be considered at 1/3 for the way out, 1/3 for the way back and 1/3 in reserve. Learn how to properly bleed a tuna before you go. Make sure while you're out there that someone is ALWAYS fishing. You can't catch anything if you don't have a line in the water.
 

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some suggestions for overnight trips from someone who's been on 10 or 15 out of Texas for tuna at our rigs.
Get some sleep. Take turns on the way out and back to take an hour or two nap. It'll be easier when you get back to the dock when it comes to cleaning fish/the boat etc. Take what you need but there's no need for everyone on board to bring 10 rods/reels. Bring what you'll use. Room on most boats is at a premium. Bring an extra set of clothing on the boat plus another set in your vehicle for the way home. Test all drags/knots at home before you leave. Bring plenty of ice. There's nothing worse than running low on ice when you have valuable tuna in the boat. Make a trip plan and stick to it. Let your wife/friends know where you'll be and approximately when you'll return. Fuel should be considered at 1/3 for the way out, 1/3 for the way back and 1/3 in reserve. Learn how to properly bleed a tuna before you go. Make sure while you're out there that someone is ALWAYS fishing. You can't catch anything if you don't have a line in the water.
I'll look up some YouTube videos on how to bleed tuna. So, if you catch a tuna thats too big for the fish box what are those green towel things I've seen people drape over them?

I've got my eye on a EPIRB and will make sure I have one before making that trip. The ice plan was to fill my 3 fish boxes/ beer boxes with ice and supplies. Then have a big cool strictly for ice which will definitely hold it longer than we will be out there. Though I do hear tuna burn through ice..
 

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Here's a good article which describes proper care and bleeding of tuna. https://www.fishing.net.nz/fishing-advice/how-to/gamefishing-looking-after-your-tuna/

For small tuna like blackfin and yellowfin under 30lbs, I'll typically brain them to kill them and then use a knife to cut the gills on both sides and then across the tail. I then hang them on a rope overboard to bleed and to cool down a bit before putting them on ice. The green "towel" thing you've seen is a green plastic that covers the meat for bluefin that commercial vessels use when they put the fish in a salt water slurry. That prevents the meat from soaking in water. You can buy fish bags too for the boat. They fold up easily and can hold a ton of ice and fish. Example- https://www.tackledirect.com/boone-00015-monster-fish-bag-x-large.html?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIu-XZq9f_4QIVT57ACh3szApiEAQYAiABEgLudfD_BwE
 

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I bought a garmin inreach for going way off shore. Sat text and SOS. Works good. Sure fells better being able to communicate 50 miles from land.
 
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