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Here are some pics I have found online. This is crazy.



Second night pic



Day pics starting from this morning



Another



Last one



Caught some cobia in destin last week also but never posted them.

Here they are, both small and barely legal.

 

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The 11 missing guys were on the rig floor and caught the explosion when the well blew. The are no chum in the water and will just be remembered. The rig sank today and the well was discharging 9,000 gals. of oil an hour. Two drill ships side track the well and were finally able to cement it shut. Now they are cleaning up the spill. Total loss of the rig is estimated at 700 million dollars. Fuel will probably be going up in the very near future.
 

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cml5207 (23/04/2010)The 11 missing guys were on the rig floor and caught the explosion when the well blew. The are no chum in the water and will just be remembered. The rig sank today and the well was discharging 9,000 gals. of oil an hour. Two drill ships side track the well and were finally able to cement it shut. Now they are cleaning up the spill. Total loss of the rig is estimated at 700 million dollars. Fuel will probably be going up in the very near future.
Fuel goes up much more and I have a feeling this economy is going to crash and burn. I'm ready to just park my vehicles on the weekend and only use them to go to work during the week. :banghead
 

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I work as a DP operator on a sistership to this rig, and I am curious to see the full report if and when it becomes available. This a tragedy, and I feel for the families of the victims.
 

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Gump, My hearsay is they had just finished the drill and was running casing to cement and got a kick and that was the cause???

My guess is that wasnt because we know they didnt drill into the zone prior to cementing the casing and then they can set a BOP and drill through into the zone then safely. Somehow the valves apparently didnt stop the gas from reaching the rig, so if they failed thats over 10,000 psi. If the rig fell on the casing or open hole they have no choice except to drill into the formation again within a few hundred feet and fill it with cement. It will probably bridge but then again it may not and if it does its just a matter of time before it blows the block out. They cant drill into the formation because they will lose circulation and when the mud is sucked into it they also will have the same thing on their hands. No happy blowouts. Unfortunately this one was real bad. Loss of life is not even comparable to money. These are things which happen in a field, whether on land or offshore. its very dangerous and gas can be very violent. All measures to preventing this billion dollar problem are taken, its not a bunch of clowns that work a rig.

One pin head at 10,000 feet is 333 Atmospheres, or 333xs greater when it reaches the top!

Im not profecient in drilling but I hear a lot! LOL

Im Safety Anchor and Frac Restraints for land completion workovers.

Steve Holloway
Mid South Contractors
Laurel MS
 

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For some reason I can't see Gulftider's report, but would like to say good job to that boat for responding to this emergency. This was truly a rare and tragic event, but it reminds us all to be aware of our fellow fishermen and assist when you can (not whenconvenient) because you never know when you may be the one in peril.

Thoughts and prayers to those involved in the event.
 

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If I'm correct, this is the company - Trans -Ocean that my brother in law is going to work for very soon. I too worked on the rigs and have flew around in the mail helo and flew over a rig named Duel12 that burnt up. It was a nasty site to see! may god be with all the people and familes!
Chris
 

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Great pics of a trajic event...:angel Thanks fer sharing everything...:usaflag
 

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BOHUNTER1 (23/04/2010)Gump, My hearsay is they had just finished the drill and was running casing to cement and got a kick and that was the cause???

My guess is that wasnt because we know they didnt drill into the zone prior to cementing the casing and then they can set a BOP and drill through into the zone then safely. Somehow the valves apparently didnt stop the gas from reaching the rig, so if they failed thats over 10,000 psi. If the rig fell on the casing or open hole they have no choice except to drill into the formation again within a few hundred feet and fill it with cement. It will probably bridge but then again it may not and if it does its just a matter of time before it blows the block out. They cant drill into the formation because they will lose circulation and when the mud is sucked into it they also will have the same thing on their hands. No happy blowouts. Unfortunately this one was real bad. Loss of life is not even comparable to money. These are things which happen in a field, whether on land or offshore. its very dangerous and gas can be very violent. All measures to preventing this billion dollar problem are taken, its not a bunch of clowns that work a rig.
What you posted is not entirely true. Wells are drilled into production zones prior to cementing production casing. At this point there will already beseveral other casing strings ran and cemented (conductor, surface & intermediate casings). In most cases, a conductor is ran first, prior to the surface casing. The BOP's (blow out preventers) will be installed on one of these casing heads, which in the case of the Deepwater Horizon, was on the sea floor. There is a riser that connects the subsea BOP stack to the floating drilling rig.

One of the articles I read about the accident indicated they had drilled down to ~18,000'. In order to drill to this depth they had to have a BOP stack installed. More than likely the BOP stack they were using was rated at 15,000 psi, possibly 20,000 psi. If they were running production casing, there's usually a shoe/float valve run on the end of the casing which preventsbackflow up the casing.

It's truely an unfortunate incident, one which I hope is never repeated.
 
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