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In response to comments from another thread on this subject it became obvious tome that there are some misunderstandings regarding the FWC Tournament exemption rules, soI dug them up.....I did not make the rules, I am just passing them along FYI!



From the FWC website - http://myfwc.com/License/Permits_RedFishCulling.htm<H3>Culling Permits</H3><P class=Body>To be eligible for a culling permit, tournaments must involve 50 or more participants, have written rules and regulations, require an entry fee and award prizes to competitors.<P class=Body>Tournament exemption permits will only be issued to catch-and-release redfish tournaments that agree to the following permit conditions:
  1. <LI>Tournament anglers and tournament staff must attempt to release alive all redfish that are caught, including those fish that are weighed in;</LI><LI></LI>Each 2-person team of tournament anglers may possess no more than 2 live redfish in the boat?s livewell or recirculating tank at any one time; <LI>All boats used in the tournament must contain recirculating or aerated livewells that are at least 2.4 cubic feet or 18 gallons in capacity; <LI>Dead redfish possessed by a 2-person team of tournament anglers may not be discarded. A dead redfish is considered harvested and will count as the daily bag limit for the team of tournament anglers who harvested that fish. <LI>Redfish must be maintained in an aerated recovery holding tank prior to release. Recovery holding tank requirements may be specified in the tournament exemption permit at the FWC?s discretion to increase survival of released redfish; <LI>The tournament must provide the FWC with a description of the aerated recovery holding tank(s) used to maintain redfish alive after weigh-in. <LI>The tournament must provide the FWC with a description of the location where tournament-caught redfish will be released after weigh-in. To increase survival of released redfish, release locations may be specified in the tournament exemption permit at the FWC?s discretion; <LI>The tournament must agree to allow FWC staff the opportunity to collect research data and conduct research and onboard-monitoring during the tournament, as needed; and <LI>The tournament must submit a post-tournament report to the FWC indicating the number of fish weighed in each day of the tournament, the number of fish weighed in dead each day, and the number of fish that died after being weighed in, but prior to release each day. The FWC may specify additional tournament reporting requirements as a condition of the tournament exemption permit.</LI>
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<TABLE style="WIDTH: 658px" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD><H1>Tournament best management practices - Redfish catch, hold and release</H1></TD></TR><TR class=Body><TD vAlign=top><P class=Body>The following guidelines outline voluntary management practices for tournament anglers and organizers to use when catching, holding, and releasing redfish during tournaments. These basic guidelines increase the chances of survival of fish caught by hook and line. <H3>Catch and release</H3><UL class=Body><LI>Avoid using stainless hooks. These hooks do not rust out if a fish is gut-hooked and you have to cut the line. </LI><LI>Land your fish quickly. </LI><LI>If you are not placing your fish in a livewell, leave your fish in the water during release. </LI><LI>Use a de-hooking device to remove hooks. Using needle-nose pliers may injure a fish's mouth. If the fish is gut-hooked, cut the line and do not attempt to remove the hook. </LI><LI>When releasing a fish that has been held in a livewell, release the fish head-first. </LI><LI>Revive fish by moving them forward (not back and forth) in the water to promote water flow over the gills. </LI>[/list]<H3>Handling</H3><UL class=Body><LI>Avoid picking up fish by the lip or lower jaw or holding the fish vertically. </LI><LI>Avoid holding a fish by its gill plate or touching its gills. </LI><LI>Minimize the amount of time that you handle a fish to reduce stress. Release or place your fish in a livewell as quickly as possible. </LI><LI>Always handle fish with bare wet hands and not gloves, towels, etc. to avoid removing a fish's slime. The slime coating protects the fish from disease. </LI>[/list]<H3>Livewells</H3><UL class=Body><LI>Non-recirculating livewells should be aerated continuously with air (bubble) stones. </LI><LI>Never fill your livewells in areas of poor water quality (e.g. areas with high water temperatures, muddy areas, etc.). Avoid filling your livewell near marinas and boat docks. </LI><LI>Use large livewells. State regulations require a minimum livewell size of 18 gallons. However, a minimum livewell size of 25 gallons is recommended. Larger livewells reduce bruising and damage to fins, allow more room for fish to move around, and have more water for the dilution of waste products. </LI><LI>The water temperature in the livewell should be maintained as close to the temperature of the water body from where the fish was harvested. Chilling livewell water or allowing livewell water to overheat may cause thermal shock if the livewell water temperature varies more than 5°F from the water body that the fish was harvested from. </LI>[/list]<H3>Catch bags</H3><UL class=Body><LI>Some tournament formats require the use of catch bags to transport redfish for measuring and weigh-in. Redfish Tournament Exemption permits require that only one redfish may be transported in a catch bag at a time. </LI><LI>When transporting redfish with a catch bag, the bag should be opened to allow aerated water at the appropriate temperature to flow through the bag as much as possible. </LI>[/list]</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

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<TABLE style="WIDTH: 658px" border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD><H1>FAQs - Redfish catch, hold and release tournaments</H1></TD></TR><TR class=Body><TD vAlign=top><P class=Body>In response to numerous questions from tournament anglers, the Division of Marine Fisheries Management has compiled the following list of questions and answers. Please use the e-mail link at the bottom of this page if you have any questions not covered here, and watch for new questions and answers attached to future culling permits. <UL class=Body><LI>Why isn't there a tagging program to gather information on redfish that are caught and released during redfish tournaments? </LI><LI>What do redfish eat during their different life cycles? </LI><LI>Can you over-oxygenate a livewell? </LI><LI>Is it better to use medical grade oxygen for the livewell? </LI><LI>Is it better to use a boga grip when handling fish during the measuring and weigh-in process? </LI><LI>If I have the appropriate size livewell on board to qualify for the culling permit, do I have to put the redfish that I catch during the tournament in it? </LI>[/list]<H3><A name=tag></A>Why isn't there a tagging program to gather information on redfish that are caught and released during redfish tournaments?</H3><P class=Body>There are several reasons why angler-based tagging programs are not the scientific data collection method of choice:
  1. <LI>Tagging programs are very labor intensive and require a lot of manpower to manage. Not having enough manpower, or money to provide manpower are always issues for research. </LI><LI>Anglers (for the most part) do not have enough training to tag fish and can cause more harm than good to the fish during the tagging process. </LI><LI>Even though fish may be tagged during a tournament, it is not scientifically possible to directly calculate whether or not a fish died just because of tournament-related activities. More controls are needed to be able to collect solid data on mortality (deaths). </LI><LI>On average, a tagging program will get 1- to 5-percent tag-return information. There are other scientific data collection methods that are not as labor intensive and can produce better information. </LI>
<P class=Body>This is not to say that the FWC has ruled out using angler-based tagging programs as a data collection method. The FWC's Fish and Wildlife Research Institute is considering using angler-based tagging programs in the future but those programs will be subject to very controlled circumstances to preserve the integrity of the data collected. <P class=Body> ..................................................................................................................<H3>How to apply</H3><P class=Body>Tournament Directors: Please complete and submit an application form, along with current tournament rules and regulations to:<P class=Body>FWC Division of Marine Fisheries Management
620 S. Meridian Street, MB 4B3
Tallahassee, FL 32399<P class=Body>Contact [email protected] or <SPAN class=skype_pnh_print_container>850-487-0554<SPAN dir=ltr class=skype_pnh_container><SPAN class=skype_pnh_mark><P class=Body><SPAN dir=ltr class=skype_pnh_container><SPAN class=skype_pnh_mark><P class=Body><SPAN dir=ltr class=skype_pnh_container><SPAN class=skype_pnh_mark></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
 

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Discussion Starter #3
<P align=center>Not sure there has to be a "point"! <P align=center>


The post is intended to beinformational and educational for those that choose to be properly informed on such mattersand not just guess and pass onbad info. There was also some other good info on handling fish etc; some people may find thatinteresting and beneficial as well.

Have a great day andI hope this weather breaks so I canpractice those release techniques!!

 
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