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I’m trying to find the local and NEC requirements for smoke detectors for new construction. Do I have to put one in every bedroom, or just in the hall? Also, I think I need one in the laundry. Anyone know for sure?
 

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Every bedroom, hallway, and attached garage. They need to be communicating where if one goes off, they all go off. Also, if you have any gas appliances, the detector in the hallway leading to the bedrooms will need to detect carbon monoxide as well.

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What's crazy is my carbon monoxide detector is on the ceiling. Figured it should have been down low.

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What's crazy is my carbon monoxide detector is on the ceiling. Figured it should have been down low.

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https://www.carbonmonoxidedetectorplacement.com/

Getting the Height Right

You must ensure you get your carbon monoxide detector installation height right. While some guides might recommend placing your detectors on the ceiling, I don't agree.

The specific gravity of Carbon Monoxide is 0.9657 (with normal air being 1.0), this means that it will float up towards the ceiling because it is lighter than regular air. However, when a build up of dangerous levels of CO gas is taking place, this is nearly always due to a heat source that is not burning its fuel correctly (motor vehicle exhaust fumes are an exception). This heated air can form a layer near your ceiling which can prevent the Carbon Monoxide from reaching a ceiling detector.


For this reason I strongly suggest that it is best to mount your detectors on the walls at least a couple of feet below the height of the ceiling. If your detector has a digital read-out, then I recommend placing it at about eye level so you can easily read it.
 

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Use 12/3 or 14/3 to wire them, the red wire will tie them all together so if one goes off they all go off. I usually pick up the power off of a bathroom or bedroom light circuit or other circuit that gets a lot of use, before the switch of course. That way in case of a tripped breaker its obvious the detectors don't have a/c power. Don't use a dedicated breaker for them that could be turned off and forgotten.

Use a photoelectric detector near the kitchen, they are not as sensitive to false trips from frying foods, and ionization detectors elsewhere.
 
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