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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I don't think I've ever seen this. I think it's a coloration variation but not sure but not white enough to be piebald. He also seems a little unhealthy/skinny for our club. Bony in the hips big time. Any ideas?

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that's a sick lookin deer, majorly emaciated, if you can see ribs like that with fur, that pretty bad. He almost looks like he's darker that normal up higher.
 

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he is shedding his summer coat going to his winter. that is the darker color, but that has nothing to do with his anirexia looking body. shouldnt be ehd but you never do know
 

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There's nothing at all wrong with that buck other than being thin but this could be something as simple as him being a young buck and getting run off from the preferred food sources by mature deer. He looks to be a melanistic deer and is shedding his summer coat. Melanistic deer produce more of the pigment melanin, which makes them much darker than "regular" deer. It's just a genetic color phase and quite a bit more rare than an albino.
 

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he is shedding his summer coat going to his winter. that is the darker color, but that has nothing to do with his anirexia looking body. shouldnt be ehd but you never do know
X2......thats all it is........that darker undercoat at this time of year is also very short, like peach fuzz.....also I dont think Melanistic. That would be completely black....like these
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Say what you want, something is up with this deer. Way to skinny with all the plentyfull forage.
Yeah - got about fifteen other deer at this location and none of the others are "shedding". He is also the normal color (except for the variations) so melanistic is not adding up either. Still not sure what it is but it's not normal. Here's a couple more close ups. Look at the neck

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After a second look. Almost looks like Demodectic Mange or Demodicosis. Also Deer Hair Loss Syndrome can look like this and the deer loses weight as well. Google that and look at images.
 

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http://www.hunting-with-kenny.com/hunting-blog.html

For immediate release: September 27, 2012
Media contact: Kevin Baxter, 727-896-8626
Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission

Florida is the latest state to report the presence of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) in its white-tailed deer herd. This viral disease has been confirmed in two deer and suspected in at least 10 others from North Florida that were examined this year.

EHD is an insect-borne disease, transmitted to deer by small biting flies known as midges or “no-see-ums.” The disease can cause illness or death in individual deer but should disappear when freezing temperatures halt insect activity. EHD cannot be transmitted to humans or pets; however, as a general rule, people should avoid consuming sick or unhealthy deer.

“This is a disease that you typically see in late summer or the fall, and it often occurs after periods of drought,” said Dr. Mark Cunningham, wildlife veterinarian for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). “The good news is we don’t expect long-term impacts to our state’s deer herd.”

Deer infected with EHD may have pronounced swelling of the head, neck, and tongue, and often have large ulcers in the mouth. Infected deer are often found near water and may be lethargic, lame and emaciated.

The FWC is monitoring the health of the state’s deer herd and is examining deer for EHD and other diseases. Sightings of sick or dead deer can be reported to the FWC by calling 866-CWD-WATCH (866-293-9282), which is the state’s chronic wasting disease hotline number.

In addition to Florida, at least 12 other states are reporting EHD cases.
 

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http://www.hunting-with-kenny.com/hunting-blog.html

For immediate release: September 27, 2012
Media contact: Kevin Baxter, 727-896-8626
Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission

Florida is the latest state to report the presence of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) in its white-tailed deer herd. This viral disease has been confirmed in two deer and suspected in at least 10 others from North Florida that were examined this year.

EHD is an insect-borne disease, transmitted to deer by small biting flies known as midges or “no-see-ums.” The disease can cause illness or death in individual deer but should disappear when freezing temperatures halt insect activity. EHD cannot be transmitted to humans or pets; however, as a general rule, people should avoid consuming sick or unhealthy deer.

“This is a disease that you typically see in late summer or the fall, and it often occurs after periods of drought,” said Dr. Mark Cunningham, wildlife veterinarian for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). “The good news is we don’t expect long-term impacts to our state’s deer herd.”

Deer infected with EHD may have pronounced swelling of the head, neck, and tongue, and often have large ulcers in the mouth. Infected deer are often found near water and may be lethargic, lame and emaciated.

The FWC is monitoring the health of the state’s deer herd and is examining deer for EHD and other diseases. Sightings of sick or dead deer can be reported to the FWC by calling 866-CWD-WATCH (866-293-9282), which is the state’s chronic wasting disease hotline number.

In addition to Florida, at least 12 other states are reporting EHD cases.
Saw this on the outdoor channel the other day. Micheal Waddell's farm was suffering from a severe case of this and he had like 30+ deer die because they kept spreading it to each other.

With that said though it just looks like mange to me.
 

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That poor bugger will be coyote bait in two weeks, he is in very poor condition and definelty hammered with some kind of mortal disease, I'd have popped him in the head with my 22.
 
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