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Discussion Starter #1
After reading about various mirage drives breaking i am wondering how much time are on these drives before failures start appearing. i just got an outback and it has only been in freshwater one time. how long have you guys had them before your first things start to pop....also what preventative maintenance do you do on them after each trip?
 

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Formerly Hank Hill
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You should rinse with fresh water after they have been in salt water. Occasionally inspect chain and cables, make they aren't getting loose. and occasionally lubricate. My .02. I've used mine almost a year now and have had no problems, only minor adjustments.
 

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Most of the time they break, they are after hours and hours of use. I am talking like 200 hours or more. There are guys on here that put 10+ hours of use on them every week, really ride them hard, and fix 1-2 things a year on them maybe. So yes they break, but it is from a lot of use and wear. They are extremely reliable.

Most of the time they break by guys peddaling too hard and hitting something. Yes the sprockets wear down over time, but most guys will tell you they break them by abuse.
 

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I and most of the guys I fish with probably fish at the very minimum 40 hours a month offshore and we probably break something every other month or so.

I think the best thing you can do besides rinsing and lubing after every trip is not get on the pedals hard from a stop especially with turbo fins. This puts a crazy amount of stress on the unit. I have been trying to get going slowly and then speed up but when the bite is hot its hard to do that when you want to get back over the spot as fast as you can.
 

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Not to de-rail, but, Chad, how did the shaft break, hitting an underwater obstruction?
Shaft didn't break spine did that's the big piece that everything is connected to. I was servicing and over tightened set screw that holds pulley then it just popped with pressure. I have bent the shafts on turbo fins just due to the torque they cause. I spend a lot of time on the water so they get used heavily.
 

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baby_doc
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a mirage drive in my view is a device that has a lot of moving parts. more moving parts= more failures/mishaps. but i will not go back to paddling a kayak unless i have to. So i just always accept that they will break sometime, and bite the bullet and fix them. mine had about a year on them before anything really broke. so take all the advice from everyone you see here
 

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We put literally hundreds of hours on our mirage drives, without any major failure. And we are certainly not delicate with our equipment.
Any device can fail, but we are not talking about some jack leg operation and a new trial and error piece if equipment. Hobie has been making the Mirage Drive for over a decade, so they have it pretty close to perfect.

I do, however, think professional service is money well spent. Taking your Mirage Drive to Key once a year to let them go over it and replace anything wearing, before you have an untimely failure is an easy choice. I think our dealer charges like 40 bucks. Cheap insurance.

Cheers
Drew
 

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Senior Yakker
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I think I'm on the lucky side. Two years with almost no maintenance and I hardly ever rinse them off. Still going strong...for now. I'm very careful about hitting bottom/obstructions. I also remove them before ever dragging it up onto the beach...every time.
 

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Most parts are $20-$30 you can literally rebuild one for relatively cheap. Here's one I just got done with for a buddy. It's a V1 and I upgraded to the V2 sprockets ( threaded) and turbo fins and chains for less than $200. This is a 5yr old drive that's like new now. That's why I just keep spare parts cheap insurance.
 

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