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I dove a spot in the gulf I like to fish and saw 2 lion fish. I heard that is bad news. I'd like to keep the snapper, trigger, and grouper on this spot, until I catch them. The lion fish are about 10" long. There's 2 of them. Should I try to get rid of them? Are they going to kill the good fish?
 

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Get use to it they are here to stay kill them clip the fins and clean them they are very good eating. If you get stung the sting is just like a scorpion fish just run as hot of water that you can stand and the pain will diminish fast. They aren't going to kill you or cause any real serious problems unless maybe you have other medical problems to go along with a sting. only extreme pain until the venom dissipates into your system. Hot water is the answer...
 

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I dove a spot in the gulf I like to fish and saw 2 lion fish. I heard that is bad news. I'd like to keep the snapper, trigger, and grouper on this spot, until I catch them. The lion fish are about 10" long. There's 2 of them. Should I try to get rid of them? Are they going to kill the good fish?
Here is some info. from FWC on lion fish and this link.......
http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/nonnatives/marine-species/lionfish/harvesting/

Harvesting lionfish
FWC encourages divers and anglers to remove lionfish, which can help Florida's native marine fish and habitats. Lionfish can be speared, caught in hand-held nets or caught on hook and line.
Recreational divers and anglers must have a recreational fishing license to take lionfish.
There are no size or bag limits up to a total catch weight of 100 pounds.
To harvest more than 100 pounds or to sell lionfish, a saltwater products license is required.
Divers should know the rules for using spears. Spears may not be used:
Within 100 yards of a public swimming beach, any commercial or public fishing pier, or any part of a bridge from which public fishing is allowed;
Within 100 feet of any part of a jetty that is above the surface of the sea - except for the last 500 yards of a jetty that extends more than 1,500 yards from the shoreline;
In Collier County and in Monroe County from Long Key north to the Miami-Dade County line;
In any body of water under the jurisdiction of the Department of Environental Protection, Division of Recreation and Parks (Florida Park Service). Possession of spearfishing equipment is prohibited in these areas, unless it is unloaded and properly stored.
Harvest by other means, such as hand-held nets, is allowed in all of these situations.
There are general saltwater regulations that apply to the harvest of all marine species, including lionfish. These regulations prohibit the use of certain gear such as explosives, fish traps and certain nets, and prohibit the harvest of fish while using a rebreather.
A permit is required to harvest lionfish in the no-take zones of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Permits are issued by the Sanctuary following training given by the Sanctuary and the Reef Environmental Education Foundation (REEF).
Handling lionfish
Lionfish should be handled carefully; they have venom glands on the dorsal, pelvic and anal spines.
NOAA recommends treating a puncture wound by immersing the wound area in hot (not scalding) water for 30-90 minutes and to seek medical attention as soon as possible. The Poison Help Hotline, 800-222-1222, is available 24 hours a day, every day.
Unless a person is allergic to the venom, lionfish stings are very rarely fatal. Stings can be very painful, cause numbness, swelling and even temporary paralysis.
Reporting lionfish
Call the nationwide reporting number (877-STOPANS) sponsored by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or fill out an online report on the USGS website.
NOAA is particularly interested in receiving information about sightings in the Gulf of Mexico. It would also like to receive specimens. An instruction sheet on how to collect specimens and contact information for NOAA is available online.
 

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I'll agree with the good tasting. If you don't want them, I'll take them. They are not hard to clean.
 
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