Pensacola Fishing Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We are going to put new flooring down throughout our house except the bathrooms and laundry room. We plan on glueing it to the concerts slabs. I'm trying to decide the best place to start. I'm concerned if I start in a bedroom it might not be extremely square to the walls when I get in the living room or vice versa. Any recommendations? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,494 Posts
Chalk a line first. If there is a hallway that goes directly into LR or BR measure out from walls in the large room at each end (far and near from hall) and make pencil marks on floor along the far wall and at the hallway equal distances out from side wall. Get someone to hold the end of the line on the far pencil mark and stretch the line to end of hall with the line passing over the mark near the hallway. Snap the line and use that reference line to measure into other rooms. You can start your layout along that line or measure over a few inches if need be for less ripping of material.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,719 Posts
I've always just simply started along an exterior wall in the "great room" and have never had a problem. Exterior walls are definitely going to be your best bet for being square. There's really not much you can do when you get to an interior wall that is not square, which is why you don't start there. I've seen some TERRIBLE interior walls that I had to get "creative" with. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
I have done this several times and will share a tip. Instead of putting it directly on the concrete, glue down some of that black roofing paper first. This will act as a moisture barrier that will keep your floor moisture free. Takes a little more time and glue but well worth it. Because it comes in big rolls, it doesn't take much to cover the entire area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,604 Posts
use a 2in1 glue product (adhesive+vapor barrier). Bostich makes a good one. otherwise use MVP first, then snap lines and glue down. Do not install wood directly to slab without doing one of those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,368 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
use a 2in1 glue product (adhesive+vapor barrier). Bostich makes a good one. otherwise use MVP first, then snap lines and glue down. Do not install wood directly to slab without doing one of those.

Thanks. Do you have to acclimate the engineered floor this time of the year before laying it? The house is not air conditioned yet. Is it okay to lay it without the AC turned on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,575 Posts
Thanks. Do you have to acclimate the engineered floor this time of the year before laying it? The house is not air conditioned yet. Is it okay to lay it without the AC turned on?
What ever you end up doing don't run it tight to any walls, there needs to be expansion and contraction at the wall or your floor will end up looking like the bay on a choppy day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,647 Posts
You will be better off letting acclimate in a climate controled space, bit either way it is going to expand and contract. As stated dont lay it tight at the walls
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Alright here's the deal on installing engineered wood on concrete. Let wood acclimate (time has nothing to do with acclimation period). You may want to borrow a moisture meter. Allow the thickness of the floor to allow for expansion and contraction all around the perimeter of the floor including tile areas. This will effect your 1/4 round or shoe molding, if the floor doesn't slide under existing baseboard and yes you need a t-molding at tile areas. As far as glue there are a lot out there. Typically a 5 gallon bucket will cover 150-200 sq. ft. Get a 2-n-1 glue. Aka eco995 made by Mapei. Go see Jimmy at Lumber Liquidators in Pcola and tell him Dan sent you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
I always thought that all the issueswe go try to accumulate the wood, no one thinks that it came over here in a blazing hot shipping container and probably sat around the store for 6 months in an un-airconditioned space!! But yes you have to let acculmate. I cut open the end of the boxes on mine.

Each wood product has a manufactured install instructions. If you dont follow them to a tee and have any problems they will be your problems. Make sure you spell that out completely.
Been there done that and won!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,304 Posts
I wouldn't do it until the house is climate controled. High moisture can play hell on wood floors.
I've seen my share of "cupped and buckled" floor when buliders where in to big of hurry and had to have the floors in or the house sat empty without C.C.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top