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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey everyone. My wife and I live in the NW, and fishing is our thing. We have enjoyed visiting the Pensacola area and plan to start spending some time down there, especially during the winter months. Thought about buying and storing a conventional boat, but after watching a bunch of vids wonder if we couldn't learn the area a bit and be well served by a couple kayaks for a while?

I'm 55, wife is 54. I'm a decent sized guy, 225lbs. Wife is 165. Not thinking of hard core launching into the surf. Thinking more like fairly protected water like the grass flats around Big Lagoon, Bayou Grande, etc. Not as worried about budget as I am getting a couple of safe, stable kayak's that would serve us well for fishing and learning some of the backwater areas. I believe they have to be pedal drive. From what I've read, for stability the Hobie Pro Anglers seem to be pretty tough to beat? I'm wondering if a Pro Angler 14 for me and a Pro Angler 12 for the wife might be a good way to go? Does the Hobie Ama outrigger system make those things a lot more difficult to flip?

We will be able to visit for a month or so at a time many times. I assume with just exploring areas like Big Lagoon, and sticking fairly close to some of the launches we should be able to learn the ropes a bit and catch some fish? Mostly interested in red and specks.

jAny advice or thoughts would be genuinely appreciated.
 

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I own a Hobie Revolution and fish from it about 2 days a week on average. My thought is if you stay in protected water and don’t do anything stupid you won’t flip , with or without the outriggers.

Others will be proponents of other brands of kayaks but I bought my Hobie and love it. The Pro Anglers are made to fish out. They are heavy so plan on getting a trailer.

~JOE~
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Don't know about kayaks but my wife would kill me if I posted her weight and age on here.:D
That made me smile! Wife is an ex model, 5'10 auburn haired green eyed hottie. Still takes my breath away and turns guys heads. Nobody believes her age when they see her.

I apologize, I realize I posted this in the wrong part of the kayak forum by accident. My wife isn't totally sold on the idea of kayaks. We may end up going with a medium sized skiff of some type.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I own a Hobie Revolution and fish from it about 2 days a week on average. My thought is if you stay in protected water and don’t do anything stupid you won’t flip , with or without the outriggers.

Others will be proponents of other brands of kayaks but I bought my Hobie and love it. The Pro Anglers are made to fish out. They are heavy so plan on getting a trailer.

~JOE~
We have a couple year old F-150 4x4 we are going to drive down and leave there. If we go the kayak route we will probably get a roof rack with kayak saddles. We know a guy here in the NW that has two Hobie Outback's and he has rollers that flip up at the back of his rack to make sliding the kayaks up onto the rack pretty easy. Once they are on the rack he flips the rollers down and secures them into the saddles. I think the saddles me mounted to his rack were made by Yakima (close by) or Thule. IF we go the skiff route we will use the truck for towing.
 

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In my opinion, the extra stability you will get from that Hobi makes standing possible, but for just sit down kayaking and fising any decent kayak is plenty stable.
I would consider smaller yaks. I think you want over 12 ft for the gulf, but for protected waters I would test drive a 10 ft for her and 12 ft for you. THey will be lighter and easier to load and move around. If you are here in the winter there isn't much to pursue in the gulf anyways.
I'm a big fan of buying used kayaks to make money go further.
 

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Go with a Hobie Compass for you both. No need for PA's unless you're pretty serious about your fishing and gear hauling needs.
if you're 225, I wouldn't recommend a compass.

Maybe consider an outback or PA for yourself and a compass for the wife.

I did the same thing - I have a PA and wife has a compass.

I fish by myself a lot, she goes when the weather is good and stuff - my justification was that if I had a PA then I'd haul all the gear and she could just put a small cooler on hers. She loved the idea of not having a bunch of stuff to haul. I loved the idea of having the larger PA.
 

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if you're 225, I wouldn't recommend a compass.

Maybe consider an outback or PA for yourself and a compass for the wife.

I did the same thing - I have a PA and wife has a compass.

I fish by myself a lot, she goes when the weather is good and stuff - my justification was that if I had a PA then I'd haul all the gear and she could just put a small cooler on hers. She loved the idea of not having a bunch of stuff to haul. I loved the idea of having the larger PA.
That's fair, the compass has a weight capacity of 400lbs. The outback is 425lbs. Both are fine for a 225 person. But if you are a gear hauler, then go with the PA, cause it bumps up to 500lbs capacity for the 12'.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the thoughts and advice everyone, it is genuinely appreciated. Right now we are thinking we will buy a couple kayaks locally and try them out. We spend about 5 days a week on average fishing in our boat, but we have some great locations for kayak fishing, and we already have a 14' trailer we can use to haul a couple of kayaks. I have a locking metal box I could mount on the front of the trailer to put the drives and such in while traveling.

Somewhat considering an Outback for both of us, or an Outback for me and a compass for the wife. I'm not sure she would really mind not having reverse?

Locally there is someone selling a 2014 PA12 and a 2014 Outback on a nice Caulkins trailer that has been set up to haul two kayaks. The trailer has a nice locking box on the tongue, the PA12 has a fish finder, and both kayaks have the Hobie covers. He's asking $4,750, which seems like it may be a little high, depending on the value of the trailer.
 

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The newer outback and PA have different seats and other designs than older models. Can make a big difference, so just be aware. The 2019 outback changes were significant for example.

If you can, go and test drive. I do love my PA and also have larger power boats. Spent all Friday in my PA...not fishing for once. As others said, the PA is a fishing machine and well designed for it - - on land it is as graceful as a whale. I don't trailer. Street and sand wheels plus a tailgate extender is enough for me.

 
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