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A sales rep for one of my cabinet companies asked me the other day if I have ever heard of Jubilee. I of course said "nope". He went on to explain that that it is when ther is a lack of oxygen in the water and all the fish and shell fish come to the shore to find O2. There isn't a specific day every year. The weather dictates when it happens. It also happens in only 2 places in the world, Alabama and China.

He showed me pictures of flounder stacked on top of each other with half their bodies out of water. ?His kids walked along the beach and gigged the largest ones. To say the least they had a great feast of fish.

Has anyone else seen this before?
 

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Haven't seen it but I pretty sure this years was last month. If not mistaken It lasts about 10 hours. Badazzchef and the one that told me about it last year.

Until then I have never heard of it. I thought is was some type of religious thing when he 1st mentioned it.
 

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<H3>"The Jubilee City"</H3>

"Jubilee" - generally considered a time of great rejoicing - holds a special meaning around Mobile Bay on the Eastern Shore. To folks around Daphne and the rest of the Eastern Shore, it means a "phenomenon" which brings blue crabs, shrimp, and fish swimming from the depths of the bay into the shallow waters of the shoreline. Generally, the bottom fish, such as flounders, catfish, and stingrays, are the most affected. Crabs are almost always a part of the event.

The phenomenon in Mobile Bay has been studied very little. However, scientific evidence and local "folklore" observed that Jubilees occur only in summer months, usually in the early dawn hours before sunrise. The bay is usually calm or slick on the previous day and during the Jubilee. The wind is usually gentle and from an easterly direction on the day before and during the Jubilee; a change in wind direction will stop a Jubilee. There is usually a rising tide during a Jubilee; a change to a falling tide will stop a Jubilee. The sky on the previous day may be cloudy and overcast. The theory is that each year tons of leaves, plants and wood debris are brought into Mobile Bay by waters from the Blakeley, Apalachee, Tensaw & Mobile Rivers. This material settles to the bottom of the bay and decays.

During summertime, decomposition is accelerated and the oxygen supply is rapidly depleted from the layer of salty water along the bottom of the bay. This loss of oxygen occurs generally when the waters are calm and the east wind blows oxygen bearing surface waters away from the eastern shoreline of the bay. When this occurs the tide moves in and brings saltier bottom waters which are devoid of oxygen near the shoreline.

Meanwhile, locals make ready lanterns, giggs, scoop nets, buckets, baskets, tubs, canvas sacks, or whatever it takes to harvest the anticipated bounty of seafood. As the tide comes in, the bottom dwelling fish, shrimp, and crabs are forced to move into the shoreline and are eventually trapped in shallow water at the beach where the locals are waiting to shout "Jubilee!" The waters come alive with a variety of seafood that can be scooped up by the tubfulls to be frozen and enjoyed all year long. As dawn comes and the sun rises, those fish not caught, revive with oxygen to swim to safety once again in the beautiful bay. For those who may disbelieve . . . this is most definitely not just another "Fish Tale!"
 

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Ihavebeen tomany jubilees, they usually occur during the summer months. Although I have heard of the happening at different times of the year I have yet to see one that has happened outside of the June - September time frame. There have already been a few this year on the eastern shore. I was finally able to take my boys to one a couple of years ago, and they are definatley hooked now. They ask all the time if we can go look for one when the conditions are right.
 

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I also have seen jubilees over the years i've seen shrimp,crab and flounder. all in the summer months,here in pens. andat fort morgan
 

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Tuna Man said it perfect.... I live here in Fairhope on the Eastern Shore just south of Daphne on Hwy 98. Usually look for a rising tide, 10-15 mph NorthEast wind, very slick conditions and usually a good rain previously. A majority of the Jubilee's occur right here about two miles from my house at the point in thePoint Clear area. I have only witnessed one in my two and a half years living here. When I say the word spreads fast, the word spreads fast and the town comes alive. I left it at 2:00am and the parking lot around the pier here in Fairhope was slammed packed. Must have been 200 cars. Men, women, children wading through the water with lanterns, gigs, nets, watever they could find to collect these fish. This specific one was very plentiful of flounder and shrimp! Lets just say owners and managers in this town are very understanding about no-shows the next day at work when these phenominals occur. You really have to witness one of these and see it for yourself. People stacked up in pickup trucksholdingspot lights driving up and down the shoreline trying to find the specific spot it comes in at. If you ever swing through the Daphne or Fairhope area just stop in at the local town museums and take a look at the old pictures hanging :bpts :) This tradition goes back years and years and the old tymers always know when one is about to happen and they are very hushy hushy about it.
 
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