Pensacola Fishing Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am wanting to install wood or synthetic wood flooringin my basement. It is a concrete slab covered with old adhesive type tile (the thin stuff). My question is what is the best application for this type of installation? Will I need to remove the tiles? (It was a real pain removing them upstairs and I would like to avoid that too.I really don't want to have to nail into the concrete if I don't have too. I am capable and probably have all the tools I need for the job but need a little advice or horror stories so I'll avoid mistakes others have made. Any thoughts or tips appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,443 Posts
I redid our flooring using Pergo Laminate that locks together. We used a plastic backed pad material to go under the flooring. It is a "floating" type floor that is not nailed or glued down. The trim at the bottom of the walls holds it in place. That allows for expansion of te laminate with different weather I suppose. It was actually pretty easy...just requires some basic stuff. Good luck and hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,464 Posts
I've used all three, the Pergo style snap-to, 3/4" hardwood, and laminiated glue down.

I don't like hte snap-to. I used the 3/4" in one room of our house. I put the 3/4 plywood down and then nailed down the hardwood. That was a job. Getting the plywood down over concrete was hard. It also raised the floor 1 1/2".

For the rest of hte house I glued the lament hardwood down to the concrete slab. That was hard work but looked good. Main reason is I realized I didn't want to raise my floor that high.

One thing I read about is you can take 1/2" plywood and place on top of each other and screw together. This can then become your subfloor and just lay it onto of your slab. Its floating, but heavy enough it won't be squishy. Then nail your hardwood to the new sub.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
David,

I ended up doing the living room and hallway of my previous house in the laminate flooring.

I'd heard great things about it. It's durable, easy to install, etc.

One lesson I learned: buy one of the major manufacturers of this stuff: Pergo, Armstrong, etc. Don't buy an off-brand because install will be MUCH more difficult. With the Pergo and Armstrong, both of which my sister has in her house, you can install 1 piece at a time. She was 8-months pregnant and did the baby's room while her husband was at work... it's that easy.

I bought a cheaper brand... don't remember which one. It was a Pain to install. Because of the way the pieces locked together, an entire row had to be assembled and then locked into the previously laid row. That'sa good trick! Try to get a 20 to 30 ft. row locked into the previous row without it coming apart... not easy unless you have about 1 person per 4 or 5 ft. working together to lock it in.

Overall, I like the product, but I'll be sure to buy one of the better brands next time to save LOTS of time and heartache during the installation.

I sold the other house shortly after the installation, so I don't know how it's held up. The Pergo and Armstrong in my sister's house still looks great after 5 years.

Felix
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,464 Posts
to add to what Felix said. If you do go lament then but the thicker pieces. They come in two thickness, can't remember the numbers right now. Also buy the thicker underlayment. The price increase isn't that much and makes for a more solid floor.

Another thing you may want to do is get bisquene (sp??) and lay down below the underlayment. My co-worker had to much moister in his slab and it warped the lament. bisquene is cheap and won't hurt anything. All it can do is help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
874 Posts
If you find out you need to remove the old tile the best trick i have used is to get a 20-30 lb block of dry ice, keep it in a paper bag, let it sit on a tile till you hear it pop.. when the glue releases, slid it to the next one etc... no sticky mess , no scraping etc. The cool part is when you pick the tile up and throw in a garbage can it shatters into little pieces.. be sure to wear gloves .. it is by far the easiest way to remove vinyl glued down tiles..

rich
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">Having done this myself a few times, I will emphasize all that Felix & AUradar said.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">The three most important things are, and in this order...<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">1. A good vapor barrier.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">2. A good underlayment.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">3. Use a high quality product (The flooring).<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">Cutting corners on the vapor barrier or underlayment can & will lead to problems later regardless of the flooring product.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">Use the best flooring you can afford for all the reasons stated by Felix & AUradar.<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,921 Posts
I recently got some hardwood flooring and then found out that the area where I want ed to put it (off grade) was an old concrete porch. I was palnning on using liquid nails. Anybody ever done anything like that. I figured it would work well if I did a small section at a time and kept it weighted down with 5 gal buckets of water till it was cured.

Thanks

Sky
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Hot Reels (10/3/2007)I recently got some hardwood flooring and then found out that the area where I want ed to put it (off grade) was an old concrete porch. I was palnning on using liquid nails. Anybody ever done anything like that. I figured it would work well if I did a small section at a time and kept it weighted down with 5 gal buckets of water till it was cured.

Thanks

Sky
Obviously I know little about installing wood floors.However liquid nails is very permanent and I'm not sure how "flexible" it would be to normal expansion and contraction of the concrete.If you don't get any answers here you might consult with a flooring company about adhesive alternatives for the application.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
i did my floating floor in a couple of hours,buy the right tools for the job like spacers and some of th leverage bars and it wont be hard to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,464 Posts
Hot Reels (10/3/2007)I recently got some hardwood flooring and then found out that the area where I want ed to put it (off grade) was an old concrete porch. I was palnning on using liquid nails. Anybody ever done anything like that. I figured it would work well if I did a small section at a time and kept it weighted down with 5 gal buckets of water till it was cured.

Thanks

Sky


they make wood flooring glue, I would use that instead of liquid nails. You put it down like tile mortar, just a little harder to work with. Liquid nails work okay for small patch job and such.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
Hot Reels (10/3/2007)I was palnning on using liquid nails. Anybody ever done anything like that. I figured it would work well if I did a small section at a time and kept it weighted down with 5 gal buckets of water till it was cured.

Thanks

Sky
Sky,

Like previously stated, liquid nails is nearly permanent. Many wood flooring product are intended to "float", meaning the pieces are only attached to each other, and not to the sub-floor. You use glue to hold the pieces together.

If the product you have is not intended to float, and needs to be attached to the sub-floor, I'd take the trouble of laying a plywood sub-floor and installing the product properly. It's always easier to do something right the first time.

I'm not a pro, just a DIY'er with limited experience.

Felix
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I wouldn't install any "real" wood flooring directly onto concrete. Most likely it will cup due to the natural movement of moisture throught the concrete. The only wood flooring recommended for installation over concrete is engineered wood and / or pergo type laminates.

Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
895 Posts
I just had my living room hall way and dining room done with real hardwood not the laminate. The installers glued it to the concrete. It's guaranteed not to come lose and is backed with a excellant warranty. The reason for glueing it rather than leave it floating was to keep from having that hollow sound when you walk across it. It turned out great and I'm well pleased as is my wife, which it what really matters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
Aight fellas done it for a liv'n for two years so i've laid at least 60 hardwood floors and 60 tile jobs to . glue down to the concrete is fine the glue it 's self is the barriers and if you got kids dogs or are just a wild child go with snap lock it's tough as nails. and the newer style stuff with beveled edges(my opoion) looks damn good. the expansion by the walls is KEY . don't forget or you will find out sooner or later if you did forget. especially in the summer when it swells. good luck !!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Wood floors are great, but unless you're dead set on them, consider just having the concrete

stained. With the glue on the floor, you will have to grind the top layer off, but that's no big

deal. You can determine the color, dark or light, no cupping, virtually no maintainance. Just sweep and mop. Maybe twice a year wax and there's no build up, so no stripping. No scaring, scratching, denting or any of that stuff. Ideal for a basement.

I'm doing my living room and hall very soon. It's really good for a house with pets. That's one reason I'm doing it. Very affordable as well.

Just a suggestion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
bayougrande (10/4/2007)Aight fellas done it for a liv'n for two years so i've laid at least 60 hardwood floors and 60 tile jobs to . glue down to the concrete is fine the glue it 's self is the barriers and if you got kids dogs or are just a wild child go with snap lock it's tough as nails. and the newer style stuff with beveled edges(my opoion) looks damn good. the expansion by the walls is KEY . don't forget or you will find out sooner or later if you did forget. especially in the summer when it swells. good luck !!!
This is exactly right
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top