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ICW After the Storm----4/13/09<DIV class=post-text>Did Honeydos until the Storm was over--the storm didnt last long but we got 1 1/2 in of rain in a short period of time---then time to go fishing. My wife and i purchased two Dz Shrimp and and launched under the 59 br at LuLus. The canal looked good and the water was moving just right. Fished west and caught Reds--Specks--Sheep and some very big Sail cats.
Sure fire way to catch fish---get live Shrimp---launch at LuLus---freeline shrimp behind the boat in the ICW and hold on---you will catch something. Lots of fun. Home--Clean Fish--Bath--Get ready to watch O'Reilly Factor--- BT66
http://basstracker66.multiply.com
</DIV>
 

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If your heading North on 59 from the beach (Orange Beach / Gulf Shores), while your passing over the big bridge, you can see LuLu's on the right, on the north bank...........

 

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<H3 id=siteSub>The ICW is....</H3><H3></H3><H3></H3><H3>From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia</H3><DIV id=contentSub></DIV><DIV id=jump-to-nav>Jump to: navigation, search</DIV><DIV class="thumb tright"><DIV class=thumbinner style="WIDTH: 252px"> <DIV class=thumbcaption><DIV class=magnify></DIV>Tug and barge on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway</DIV></DIV></DIV><DIV class="thumb tright"><DIV class=thumbinner style="WIDTH: 252px"> <DIV class=thumbcaption><DIV class=magnify></DIV>Navigation on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, where it intersects with Bayou Perot, in the vicinity of New Orleans</DIV></DIV></DIV><DIV class="thumb tright"><DIV class=thumbinner style="WIDTH: 252px"> <DIV class=thumbcaption><DIV class=magnify></DIV>A section of the Intracoastal Waterway in Pamlico County, North Carolina. The Hobucken Bridge crosses the waterway.</DIV></DIV></DIV>

The Intracoastal Waterway is a 4,800-km (3,000-mile) waterway along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. Some lengths consist of natural inlets, salt-water rivers, bays, and sounds; others are man-made canals.

The waterway runs for most of the length of the Eastern Seaboard, from its unofficial northern terminus at the Manasquan River in New Jersey, where it connects with the Atlantic Ocean at the Manasquan Inlet, to Brownsville, Texas. The waterway is toll-free, but commercial users pay a fuel tax that is used to maintain and improve it. The ICW is a significant portion of the Great Loop, a circumnavigation route encircling the Eastern half of the North American continent.

The creation of the Intracoastal Waterway was authorized by the United States Congress in 1919. It is maintained by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Federal law provides for the waterway to be maintained at a minimum depth of 12 ft (4 m) for most of its length, but inadequate funding has prevented that. Consequently, shoaling or shallow water are problems along several sections of the waterway; some parts have 7-ft (2.1-m) and 9-ft (2.7-m) minimum depths. The waterway consists of two non-contiguous segments: the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, extending from Brownsville, Texas to Carrabelle, Florida, and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, extending from Key West, Florida to Norfolk, Virginia (milepost 0.0). The two segments were originally intended to be connected via the Cross Florida Barge Canal across northern Florida, but this was never completed due to environmental concerns. Additional canals and bays extend a navigable waterway to Boston, Massachusetts.

The Intracoastal Waterway has a good deal of commercial activity; barges haul petroleum, petroleum products, foodstuffs, building materials, and manufactured goods. It is also used extensively by recreational boaters. On the east coast, some of the traffic in fall and spring is by snowbirds who regularly move south in winter and north in summer. The waterway is also used when the ocean is too rough to travel on. Numerous inlets connect the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico with the Intracoastal Waterway.
 

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LOL. that is going the extra mile--or 12! well done.

the ICW is the intracoastal waterway--not just from mobile to perdido bay, but from about sabine to andrews bay.

but, the section of the ICW that BT is fishing is also affectionatly known as 'the ditch'.the bridge at lulus--thats thehwy 59 bridgehas been agreat spot for trout for as long as i can remember. i have never caught any trophies there, but from the daysof buying shrimp from butch frith, and standing on thepilings there, to just recently, i have always been able to count onkeeper trout at that bridge.

for those putting BT's info into their little black books, keep imind that is alabama waters. just make sure you are properly licensed before ya go. and, um, you would be missing out if you didnt stop at lulu's for a bushwacker while you were 'in the neighborhood'.

cheers.

drew
 

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That's quiet the answer I was lookin for & never knew all that.. It's kinda funny they say snowbirds use it.. My first thought is how many people would travel down it a boat through the ICW for fall or spring.. But hey if I was rich that would be living the life there!!!!

Thanks fer the info

B
 
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