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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, just joined after a few months of "lurking." Wonderin if anyone could point me in the direction of a website or maybe post some pics of how you configure your tackle for reds, specks, flounder, and such. I've been using those pre-madedouble- hook "gulf rigs" you get at wally world for years with a 1-2 ounce pyramid weight, depending on the current. Usually for reds I use a 2/0 or 3/0 or circle hooks. Most of my saltwater fishing is around Mobile - Gulf Shores - O/B area.Been doing pretty good with that but I'm curious if I try another setup, would I get more hits?

Thanks guys for any help you'd have time to throw me.:bowdown
 

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Jiggin Finatic
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Yes if you make yourself slider rigs with fluorocarbon and owner circle hooks then you will definitely catch way more fish than with those ready made rigs.
 

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here is how i make mine. first you have the line that is tied to the reel tied to a swivel with an egg weight of the needed size on this line. attached to the other end of the swivel is the leader that can be a heavier mono or fluorocarbon. tied to the leader is the owner circle hook. this is an all around leader that i use inshore and offshore. i just up size everything. leader is usually 18'' on inshore for me. sometimes a little longer.
 

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:withstupid thanks for the link. i use all of these i just use the one i typed the most. these are great examples though.
 

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Good question...as someone pointed out, you are definitely better off using rigs you make yourself than paying the high price of ready-rigs, which are really too much tackle for the quality fish you are targeting. I call them "helicopter rigs" because that is what they look like when you launch them out into the water.

In general, beads, three-way swivels, snap swivels, heavy leaders, etc. are way too much jewelry to entice all but the most suicidal of fish.

When it comes to inshore fishing, particularly with natural bait, I find myself rigging in two ways. These are dictated by the fish I am targeting. Sometimes, when on a boat with several fishermen, I will outfit rods with both ways so as to cover the gamut of possibilities. In general, you need to learn to rig a fishfinder rig and also just a line-to-hook rig, each of which you can vary according to circumstances.

The fishfinder rig is also known to freshwater fishermen as a "carolina rig." It basically entails a sliding sinker that rides on your main line above a swivel. Attached to the other end of the swivel is your leader, which can vary in length from 18" to 48", depending upon the targeted species and the situation. An appropriate hook is tied to the business end of your leader. This rig is good for bottom dwellers such as redfish and flounder.

When targeting fish that inhabit the middle of the water column and the surface, especially speckled trout and sometimes redfish, then it is best to tie your main line directly to the hook, particularly if the water is clear. A variation of this is to tie your main line to a short leader, perhaps 12 to 20 pound fluorocarbon via a surgeon's knot, blood knot, or uni-to-uni connection (these knots can be found in an excellent book, Bob McNally's "Fishermen's Knots, Rigs, and How to Tie Them.") Tie your hook to the business end of the leader. Keep a few sizes of split shot, the removeable kind (the completely round, unhinged ones are useless, in my opinion, in saltwater), on hand and attach them to your line, near the leader knot, picking the appropriate size according to tidal movement. If you want, you can attach a cork, 3" cigar type (whose drawback is that is not readily removeable), or a 3" to 4" split, weighted popping cork. If the water is really off-color, you can get away with a tiny swivel in lieu of the line-to-leader knot.

As for the fishfinder rig, current and tide dictate sinker size. No need to fish a 2-ounce egg weight, for instance, when fishing a light current around a dock-light at night. Usually 1/2 to 1 ounce of lead is sufficient. If you like to target bull reds or sharks from the beach, use a suitable pyramid lead as the sliding sinker, but attach it via a neat little gizmo called a "sinker slide." The big advantage of the slide is that you have a small tube of nylon riding on the main line, rather than a brass eye, which can chaffe the line over an extended period of time.

Choose hooks according to your bait. Here in Alabama, trebles are permissible; I use #8 and #10 trebles a lot when fishing live shrimp and small finfish. A #4 Kahle hook is also great in this situation. Small, light-wire circles work great in this situation; I favor the Eagle Claw black ones, but I offset the bend and point from the shaft a tad to get better hookups. A 7/0 Eagle Claw wire circle works great when employing live pinfish and cut mullet for bull reds. I really like Eagle Claw #084 #4 size bronze J-hooks when targeting pompano and whiting in the surf on a fishfinder rig.

Finally, the little red beads you see on ready-rigs have a place in my rigging. I use them on the fishfinder rig between the lead, or sinker slide, and the swivel. It provides a cushion between the sinker and your swivel knot, so your lead is knot banging on, and therefore weakening, your knot every time you cast. It also acts as a bit of an eye-catching teaser to such fish as pompano and redfish.

Hope this helps, and if we can help further, give us a call or visit us at Sam's Stop & Shop in Orange Beach, (251) 981-4245. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well thanksa bunch guys, all replies were very helpful. Guessit's time to try something new.

Hope I can meet some of you guys out there one day.
 
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