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Why is the EDF pushing them so hard?

http://www.gloucestertimes.com/fishing/local_story_319223717.html

http://www.edf.org/page.cfm?tagID=26374

http://www.publicaffairs.noaa.gov/pr95/oct95/noaa95-r152.html

NOAA 95-R152 <H1 class=expertName>

<PRE>Contact: Brian Gorman FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (206) 526-6613 10/30/95</PRE>

<H3>DAVID MCKINNEY NAMED DIRECTOR OF ENFORCEMENT OFFICE FOR NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE</H3>

David A. McKinney, a 14-year veteran of wildlife law enforcement and since 1987 a law-enforcement agent with the fisheries enforcement division of the Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has been named to head up the fisheries service's overall law enforcement operation headquartered in Silver Spring, Md.

"Dave McKinney has the experience and expertise to lead the Enforcement Division during these challenging times of marine fisheries conservation and rebuilding," said National Marine Fisheries Service Director Rollie Schmitten. "Dave reflects the best of a highly qualified list of candidates and his strong leadership bolsters our commitment to fisheries service enforcement."

Most recently, McKinney was special-agent-in-charge, running the NMFS Northwest region law enforcement division in Seattle, where his responsibilities included managing a federal marine law enforcement operation for a nine-state region in the Pacific Northwest.

McKinney began his law enforcement career in 1981 as a state trooper for Alaska's division of fish and wildlife protection in Ketchikan.

After joining NMFS' enforcement office in 1987, he became successively a special agent in Sitka, Alaska; a program planning officer for the enforcement office in Silver Spring, Md., and chief of the office's management support operations division, also in Silver Spring. He was named the Northwest region's special-agent- in-charge in 1993.

As director of the office of enforcement, McKinney will supervise the work of a staff of about 180 men and women, including 140 field personnel. The office's current budget is about $15 million.

The division enforces federal marine wildlife and fisheries laws throughout the United States and its trust territories, including the 200-mile-wide exclusive economic zone.

McKinney holds a J.D. degree in international law and a B.S. in police science, both from Columbia Pacific University. He is the co-author of a book on commercial fishing safety and has published numerous papers and articles on marine resource law enforcement.

He is married and has two daughters.</H1><H1 class=expertName>Dave McKinney</H1><P class=expertTitle>Senior Conservation Manager, Gulf of Mexico Oceans Program<P class=expertProgram>Oceans Program<P class=expertOffice>Texas Office<DIV class=expertWorkBackground><H3>Work</H3>

Dave joined Environmental Defense Fund in 2008 as the Senior Conservation Manager for the Gulf of Mexico Region. He helps lead efforts to advance incentive-based fisheries in the commercial and recreational fishing sectors in the Gulf of Mexico.<H3>Background</H3>

Dave has nearly 30 years of experience in the governance of state and federal fisheries. For the past decade he has worked for the National Marine Fisheries Service?s Office of Law Enforcement in the Southeast Region focusing exclusively on the management and monitoring of the Gulf of Mexico federal fisheries.

In this position he played an integral role in many milestones:<UL><LI>Application of the vessel monitoring system in the commercial reef fish fishery;</LI><LI>Design and implementation of the red snapper catch share program;</LI><LI>Development of the pending grouper complex catch share program.</LI>[/list]

His first exposure to catch share management came when he was tapped by the Office of Law Enforcement as a special agent in Alaska to design the enforcement component of the incentive-based halibut and sablefish fishery management plan.

In 2008, he was appointed by Texas Governor Rick Perry to represent Texas on the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission. He also serves on several advisory panels for the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council.

Dave is a contributing author to the two Limited Access Privilege Program management guides developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service and has written numerous reports on the internal management components, communication requirements and real-time data-gathering systems in catch-share programs.</DIV>
 

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Yep, everywhere that you dig, you will find one or moreof these enviromental wack jobs with their hand in the cookie jar in some shape and fashion.

EDF and others have strategicaly placed their influence everywhere in the fisheries process.

Joine the FRA and others. We need a common/large voice behind us recreational fishermen.
 

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I'm not opposed to the concept of catch shares - I think market systems are great BUT......they require adequate and timely information about supply and demand and I don't see the NMFS as an entity that can either provide that or regulate the provision of it or the resultant market. Utilities were largely deregulated but there have been MANY problems in the process. With so many species and no real set of agreed upon methods for managing the resources "marketising" fisheries seem to be a much more complex task. They (fed govt.) haven't done such a hot job with managing financial markets either. With the recent evidence of poor govt execution of regulatory responsibilities (SEC and the current financial situation) what kind of job do you think they would do with fisheries.
 
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