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Since it’s getting close...I thought I would start a place to share helpful info. Here’s a few things 8 learned.

Gear you can do without, but should buy anyways. Boot gaiters and a good bino harness are not an absolute necessity, but they will make your life so much easier if you have them. The gaiters keep your feet dry and the Bino harness keeps your Bono’s handy without being in the way. Far better than just a strap.

Also, spend the money and buy great boots And socks. They are the lifeline for your feet.
 

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Since it’s getting close...I thought I would start a place to share helpful info. Here’s a few things 8 learned.

Gear you can do without, but should buy anyways. Boot gaiters and a good bino harness are not an absolute necessity, but they will make your life so much easier if you have them. The gaiters keep your feet dry and the Bino harness keeps your Bono’s handy without being in the way. Far better than just a strap.

Also, spend the money and buy great boots And socks. They are the lifeline for your feet.
+1 to all of this.
Boot/sock/gaiter combo made all the difference in CO last year. Feet dry, knees and ankles straight. Was able to ditch my rain pants.
1070505


I bought a bino harness for western hunting and now wear it on all hunts, including turkey. Binos, rangefinder, windchecker, and cell phone all right there on my chest. One of the most useful pieces of equipment I own.

Get comfortable with your pack. Start wearing it now and do stadiums, stadiums, and more stadiums. Forward, backward, and sideways. Get your hips in shape. If you're in beetle kill, you'll be on the worst stairmaster of your life. There's little you can do about the lack of oxygen, just move slow.
1070506


And Don't Strap Your Rifle to the Side of Your Pack! You'll bump and bang your scope on trees and junk. Could result in your hunt going from successful to unsuccessful. Ask me how I know.
 

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Hunt high, camp low....elevation-wise, not in the green-cross dispensary sense.:cool:

That is as opposed to camping high and hunting low. The last thing you are going to be up for at the end of the day is having to climb back up to camp.
 

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For archery season for a 6-8 day hunt all I need is. I also hunted high and camped high. Which means I get to sleep in later and spend less time getting in on the elk. You wont catch me trying to hike 1,000 feet in elevation before day break to get in the elk. Mainly because where I am if you try to climb 1,000 feet in elevation it will probably take the average hunter 45 minutes to an hour to ascend inlcuding the breaks to catch your wind. lol
  • Two pairs of pants (one stays in the truck just in case I rip something and I wear on in)
  • Two Merino wool shirts (same reason as above)
  • Four pairs of Merino wool socks in my main pack and two in my day pack, one pair wearing in.
  • Three pairs of Merino wool boxer breifs in the pain back, one in the day pack, one pair wearing in.
  • One Merino top mid layer, one pair of zip off merino thermals.
  • One slip over jacket and one slip over bottom outter layer.
  • 6-8 days of packed meal averaging about 4,500 calories. I packed more last year and it ended up being a waste for me. I was hunting at 10,000-11,000 feet in altitude covering 10 miles a day with roughly 3,000 feet of elevation ascended and decended everyday. Im sure I burnt more than 4,500 calories a day but I just wasn't hungry. The majority of my eating would take place when I got back to camp at night.
  • 3 elk diapharm calls, one bugle tube in the truck and one on me.
  • two mouth calls
  • two head lamps and one hand held
  • raingear
  • range finder
  • extra release
  • Toilet paper
  • Jetboil
  • FIrst Aid Kit
  • Personal Locator Beacon (no cell service)
  • Tent (about 2 1/2 pounds)
  • Beanie
  • Mole skin
  • Very good pair of boots
  • Bow and arrows
  • Frame pack with day bag to go on the pack
  • Sleeping bag (about 2 1/2 pounds)
  • Sleeping pad (about 1 1/2 pounds)
  • Space blanket that stays in the day pack
  • Bivy cover that goes over my pack
  • Instant coffee
  • Water bladder and water bottle
  • Water purification tablets/ Sawyers water filter
  • Game Bags
  • Knife
The total poundage is roughly 45 pounds hiking in.

Stuff you can go without will be dependent on there you are. Where I hunt it is so dense that I won't carry binos. I also do not need extra clothes like a lot of people back in. This covered everything from 25 degrees in the morning to 75 degrees during the middle of the day. I am sure I am forgetting something but this is off the top of my head.
 
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