Pensacola Fishing Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Finally booking my bucket list hunt for 2019. I’m gonna gun hunt elk in British Columbia. Woohoo

So, now I need a gun that is capable. Anyone with elk experience want to make a recommendation? I am leaning toward 300winmag or possible 7mag. I know the 6.5creed is getting a ton of live right now but I understand the long rang umph is greater with the two aforementioned calibers.
Also, I know weight is a big issue with a elk gun. There will be a lot of running up and down hills. I am certainly no annie Oakley but want to spend sometime shooting out to 600yds.
So, what do you experienced elk hunters say?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
I shot my Colorado bull with a 30-06 at 80 yards in dark timber, but it did require a second shot. Take a look at the Kimber Mountain Ascent rifles, .300 WINMAG or 7mm Mag would do the deed.

Unless you're hunting private land, I think long/wide open shots would be rare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Ive done a ton of elk hunting in Washington state and Colorado...spent a few seasons as a guide, I would say the best things are...

A: Talk to your guide and see what they prefer their shooters use...ask what the average shot is, what the terrain is, etc.

B: Elk aren't big African game, but if you miss your sweet spot or have a poor angle you need to have enough umph to get through bigger bone and deliver energy...and if your shooting opportunities are consistently past 300 yards larger the magnum calibers give a greater kill zone/margin for error... and you might want to work on stalking technique. Your guide should in most situations work you inside of 300 yards on most elk hunts...Especially if its around the rut..they are vocal interactive animals. I know there are a ton of stories of 300+ yard shots and "this was my only shot in a week" kind of stuff...but for a guided hunt I would expect things to be inside of 300 yards most of the time. If I had a guy wanting to shoot past 300 yards I'd always push to walk closer, it was usually shooters excitement or physical condition and not nervous animals for longer range shots...it takes some pretty pressured elk or poor wind/stalking conditions to not get fairly close.

I would suggest shooting something you are comfortable with...If the average shot is inside of 300yrs and you can hit a pie plate that far 8/10 times without a bench sled then you are good to go if its a .270 or a 416 rigby...

Hunting the west coast Roosevelt elk in WA and Oregon is typically done in rain forest like conditions with glassing and shooting over clear-cuts. Rocky mountain elk are a little different story but not by much.

My guide gun was a .270 and put animals down out to 400-450yards...proper placement of a quality bullet is #1...I had guys show up with a 300 mag in one hand and a scope in the other...really made it more difficult than if they just showed up with their home rifle. Jack O'Connor loved a little lighter rifle...I also know a guy that shoots his elk every year with a .243 just not past 200 yards. The calibers you mentioned are all solid...shoot something your comfortable and confident in.

one more tip...hike, hike, hike, run, hike, and walk...the better condition you are in physically the easier your hunt will be. Elevation will always slow you down the first few days.
 

·
Constitution Conservative
Joined
·
2,581 Posts
You know what guides want?

They want a hunter in good physical shape who can take the rigors of the trail/hunt.
They want a hunter with a lot of trigger time behind the rifle they're shooting, inherent accuracy and are comfortable carrying it for long periods.

They most often complain about Out of Shape hunters with brand new, heavy magnum rifles that they don't have trigger time with because of the hard recoil and price of ammo.

They'd much rather you've a .270, .308 or 30.06, with the right bullet, that you can shoot accurately under pressure when you get your chance at that big trophy animal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
732 Posts
Finally booking my bucket list hunt for 2019. I’m gonna gun hunt elk in British Columbia. Woohoo

So, now I need a gun that is capable. Anyone with elk experience want to make a recommendation? I am leaning toward 300winmag or possible 7mag. I know the 6.5creed is getting a ton of live right now but I understand the long rang umph is greater with the two aforementioned calibers.
Also, I know weight is a big issue with a elk gun. There will be a lot of running up and down hills. I am certainly no annie Oakley but want to spend sometime shooting out to 600yds.
So, what do you experienced elk hunters say?
First talk to the guide about what their average range on taking an elk is then practice 100 yards past that shooting off sticks, kneeling, and prone.

When we use to live out in Colorado my dad has killed many elk with the .270, grand father used a 7mm mag for a while and now uses his 35 Remington. Also the 6.5 creedmoor will do just fine. So my point is any of the cartridges you mentioned will get the job done. Out of the 25+ elk they have harvested together 1 has been farther than 300 yards. The majority were less than 200 yards.

Pick the rifle that you honestly feel the most comfortable shooting. Pick a quality bullet like a Nosler Partition, Nosler Accubond, Swift Scirrocco, Barnes TTSX, Hornady GMX, Hornady Interbond, Speer Hot Cor, Swift A Frame, Trophy bonded bear claw just to name a few.

Some other things leave cotton clothes at home. Invest in some Merino wool and polyester or polyester blend type clothes. You will thank me later.

Oh and dont be scared to put another round in an elk. There have been elk that will soak up 300 win mags and then there have been elk that went right down with a .243.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST GET YOUR ASS IN SHAPE.
 

·
C-Hawk 245 Pilot House
Joined
·
5,178 Posts
A couple of trips ago I was sitting under a pine tree on a hillside in Wyoming deer hunting. Had 2 bulls come within shotgun range, could have killed both with ease. No tag, just watched them. They never knew I was there. Beautiful creatures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,025 Posts
In the 80's I used a 7mag for elk due to its incredible ballistics, was hunting very high 10,000+ feet in the Rockies (Bitterroot Wilderness in northern Idaho) where long shots were frequently encountered. It was plenty of gun, recoil wasn't an issue, and I was stout enough to carry the magnum barrel long action Remington 700. We had guys with the everything from 243 to 300win mag. From what I witnessed the 243 had its limitations and many of the 300 shooters couldn't hit anything.
I thought at the time 270, 30-06 and 7mag made the most sense for our application. A decent shot from any of those 3 would reliably down an elk.

Have to absolutely agree on physical conditioning being the most critical factor for success. Guys that were mobile and could stalk the elk would almost always bring one home and guys that couldn't often at best ended up with maybe one 300+ yard shot and usually went home without success.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
Chevy van - case of beer - turn the lights on and blow the horn - drive around the park till one steps out to see what your honking at. 2500 lb van 900 lb elk. Done deal. Just ask Ron White.

Seriously, have shot several moose with an 06. Just about all you need.

Good Luck with the hunt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
873 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I appreciate the comments y'all.

I may have gotten a bit ahead of myself. I am trying to book this coming May for 2019. I got a good friend that is going back and forth on it and am wanting him to firm up on a commitment.

I really want to bow hunt but I cannot bring myself to do it until I get an animal under my belt.

I am in pretty good physical shape but have very limited experience in any real elevation. Been up around 12,000ft one time and I wasn't fit to drive. I was definitely letting my flat lander show.

This year I spent a lot of time in the SoCal desert mountains and found jogging in the 3-5,000' relatively doable. Definitely nothing like the 12,000' experience I had in Colorado.

Anyways, I am sure I will have more questions once I get this thing booked and can plan for the elevation I will be hunting. Also, as most of you said, I can get specifics as to what the guide recommends as far as a gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,900 Posts
Do yourself a favor a bow hunt. If you are going to spend the money to go, bow hunting will be far more satisfying and won't cost you any extra. Depending on where you go, decide to shoot a bull or a cow with no "minimum" size requirement. That way you will open up your chances. My 12 year old shot a cow before he ever scored a deer with his bow. Go for it. BTW, I was only joking about the "sissy" part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
732 Posts
I appreciate the comments y'all.

I may have gotten a bit ahead of myself. I am trying to book this coming May for 2019. I got a good friend that is going back and forth on it and am wanting him to firm up on a commitment.

I really want to bow hunt but I cannot bring myself to do it until I get an animal under my belt.

I am in pretty good physical shape but have very limited experience in any real elevation. Been up around 12,000ft one time and I wasn't fit to drive. I was definitely letting my flat lander show.

This year I spent a lot of time in the SoCal desert mountains and found jogging in the 3-5,000' relatively doable. Definitely nothing like the 12,000' experience I had in Colorado.

Anyways, I am sure I will have more questions once I get this thing booked and can plan for the elevation I will be hunting. Also, as most of you said, I can get specifics as to what the guide recommends as far as a gun.
I use to live at 5,280 feet and on a weekly basis be above 8,000 feet and ski and elk hunting generally was above 10,000 feet.

My recommendation for getting in shape for an elk hunt. Cardio wise I would have it to a point where I can jog a half marathon. Then also be able to ruck 10- 12 miles at some point... Seems like it is over doing it but it will pay off when you get up to high altitude. Strength training, if you arn't a gym, goer just go three times a week and stick to compound movements. Deadlifts and squats are the main lifts mixing in bench press and overhead press along with bent rows.

A good lift plan to look up is Stronglifts 5X5s. Workout three times a week with weights and on the days you are off use that for cardio.
Do yourself a favor a bow hunt. If you are going to spend the money to go, bow hunting will be far more satisfying and won't cost you any extra. Depending on where you go, decide to shoot a bull or a cow with no "minimum" size requirement. That way you will open up your chances. My 12 year old shot a cow before he ever scored a deer with his bow. Go for it. BTW, I was only joking about the "sissy" part.
He is right when you have that first elk come charging in. Well you are sold after that.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top