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Here is an article about what is happening in the Atlantic regarding NOAA, PEW, EDF, and much more. If you do not think that it's coming our way, well just hold on tight and prepare to bend over. Jane Lubchenco who was appointed to the head of NOAA has so many ties to both EDF and PEW it's not even funny.<P class=storyheadline>NOAA puts allies from Pew on council

<SPAN class=storycredit>By Richard Gaines
Staff Writer
<DIV id=storybody><P class=nostyle>Appointments made by the Obama administration are shifting the balance of power on New England and Mid-Atlantic fishery management councils more and more toward environmental interests tied to Jane Lubchenco, the new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration chief who is building a coalition for implementing her "catch share" regulatory system.<P class=text1>A similar shift was realized on the Pacific council, but the impetus there was state, not national, politics, according to a source close to the council, which, like others, legislates for and advises NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service.<P class=text1>But the alpha objective of Lubchenco and her minions in the Environmental Defense Fund and the Pew Environment Group is to convert the nation's fisheries from commonly held resources into negotiable commodities ? catch shares.<P class=text1>On the New England council, four members have been re-appointed, but one ? Maine lobster dealer and fishing industry veteran Dana Rice ? was replaced by Glen Libby, chairman of the Mid-Coast Fishermen's Association, an organization in Port Clyde, Maine, chosen for subsidies by the Pew Environment Group.<P class=text1>At the June meeting of the New England Council, which endorsed catch shares, the conversion of the fishery from a commonly owned public resource into a private commodity, Libby was an active advocate of the landmark transformation promoted by Lubchenco.<P class=text1>Rice, meanwhile, has conducted a rear-guard defense of the open-access fishery. As far back as 2002, he was alert to the coming of "individual transferable quotas," a close relative to catch shares.<P class=text1>In an interview in a publication of the Island Institute, Rice, who had hoped for reappointment, said he feared that quotas' introduction would set up a dynamic in which the "big guy buys up the quotas and the little guy gets pushed out of the fishery."<P class=text1>The shift orchestrated in the Mid-Atlantic Council was more pronounced, with three fishing industry incumbents replaced by environmental activists. The industry reaction was also pronounced.<P class=text1>"The recreational sector finds this trend extremely disturbing," the Asbury Park (N.J.) Press wrote of the appointments, which were announced in late June just as the New England Council ended its landmark meeting that featured a vote to convert the fishery to catch shares.<P class=text1>James Donofrio, executive director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance, was quoted as saying, "The Pew Charitable Trust now runs NOAA." The Pew Environment Group is a subdivision of the Pew Charitable Trust, a Philadelphia-based 501(3)c charitable corporation endowed with more than $4 billion from the descendants of the Sun Oil Co.<SPAN class=storysplitter><P class=text1>Lubchenco rose through the academic scientific ranks in channels of Pew funding. She is also a member of the board of the Environmental Defense Fund, which has pioneered the merger of environmental and corporate interests and encourages market and investor involvement in environmental issues.<P class=text1>"After 32 years of recreational representation on the council, now there won't be any," the Asbury Park Press quoted Bruce Freeman as saying.<P class=text1>A candidate for a seat that was given to Christopher Zeman, an attorney associated with a number of environmental campaigns, Freeman recently retired from the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife.<P class=text1>Ed Goldman, a New Jersey resident, fisheries biologist and life-long fisherman; Virginian Jeffrey Deem, a longtime fishing advocate who had been chosen by his peers on the council to chair the By-Catch and Limited Access Privilege Program Committee; and Laurie Nolan, from a Montauk, N.Y., tilefish producer, were all replaced by Lubchenco.<P class=text1>Appointed to the council along with Zeman were Peter L. deFur, a consultant from Virginia and former senior scientists with the Environmental Defense Fund, and Manhattan celebrity chef and environmental activist Steven Schaefer. Schaefer has worked with SeaWeb and the Blue Ocean Institute, organizations in the Pew galaxy.<P class=text1>They join John McMurray, a consultant to the EDF, who remains on the council. <P class=text1>Altogether, 30 appointments ? many reappointments ? were announced June 25.<P class=text1>The titular appointing authority for the councils, created by the Magnuson-Stevens Act, is the U.S. Secretary of Commerce, but in practice, the appointments are made by the NOAA administrator.<P class=text1>The official press release seems to confirm the pattern. Although the release notes the appointments were those of the Secretary of the Commerce, the person named and quoted is Lubchenco.<P class=text1>Reappointed to the New England council were Rodney Avila, a New Bedford fisherman; Sally McGee of Connecticut, who represents EDF; Dave Prebble, an author and retired fisherman; and Jim Odlin, a fishing fleet owner from Maine.<P class=text1>The addition of Libby to the New England council gives it two members who are active in small fishing associations that are subsidized by Pew. The other is John Pappalardo of the Cape Cod Commercial Hook Fishermen's Association, which operates two "sectors" or fishing cooperatives with financial aid from Pew.<P class=text1>Without significant discussion in Congress, catch shares have become the defacto national policy, introduced and advanced aggressively by Lubchenco, who was part of an intellectual milleux within EDF and Pew, where the idea of privatizing the fishery was formed and developed. <SPAN class=storysplitter><P class=text1>Among other steps, she hired Monica Medina at more than $100,000 a year from Pew to chair a Catch Share Task Force, and Medina has articulated the nation's policy. <P class=text1>"Transitioning to catch shares is a priority for NOAA," said Medina on the NOAA Web site. "This task force will engage stakeholders to help ensure that the regional fishery councils and NOAA implement catch shares wherever appropriate."<P class=text1>Lubchenco and her subordinates and appointees support the rapid transition of the different regional fisheries to catch shares on the belief that the privatization would reduce bycatch and increase ownership responsibility to the conservation programs.<P class=text1>But the model and past history suggests that the business transition will yield a radical consolidation of the fishing fleets, and a loss of indigenous ownership.<P class=text1>Many in New England fear this development. Responding, Lubchenco has proclaimed that there are ways to prevent speculation and external capitalization. <P class=text1>In all, the Magnuson Act subdivided the federal waters into eight exclusive economic zones and created eight regional councils made up of part-time members from various elements in the fishery to legislate and advise the executive authority, NOAA.<P class=text1>Meanwhile, fishing industry members question whether the Mid-Atlantic council is properly constituted without a recreational fishing representative. The region, from New York through the Carolinas, is heavier with recreational fishing than New England.</DIV>
 

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Yep - unless something changes, when NOAA is done and with the PEW environmental lobbyingefforts all the "35 Ft Bertrams" that don't fish for red snapper will be parked pierside.

Mark W
 

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This woman sounds like a real winner when it comes to our rights as recreational fishermen.:banghead:banghead:banghead Now she is the head of NOAA and placing people on the councils that make the regs.<DIV class=node><DIV class=title>Jane Lubchenco</DIV><SPAN class=taxonomy><DIV class=content><TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=4><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top>
</TD><TD vAlign=top><H1>Dr. JANE LUBCHENCO</H1>

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<A name=projects></A><H3>Dr. Jane Lubchenco is an environmental scientist and marine ecologist who is actively engaged in teaching, research, synthesis and communication of scientific knowledge. She grew up in Colorado, received her PhD. and taught at Harvard University. Twenty-seven years ago, she moved to Oregon State University where she is Valley Professor of Marine Biology and Distinguished Professor of Zoology. Her research interests include biodiversity, climate change, sustainability science and the state of the oceans. She has received numerous awards including a MacArthur Fellowship, a Pew Fellowship, eight honorary degrees (including one from Princeton University), the 2002 Heinz Award in the Environment and the Nierenberg Prize for Science in the Public Interest from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 2003.</H3><H3>Current Primary Leadership Activities</H3><UL><LI>International Council for Science , President</LI><LI>National Science Board, Member (twice nominated by President Clinton and twice confirmed by the US Senate)</LI><LI>PISCO, 1 of 13 PI's, Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans: A Long-Term Ecological Consortium</LI><LI>Aldo Leopold Leadership Program, Co-Chair; advanced leadership and communication training program for environmental scientists</LI><LI>Pew Oceans Comission, Commissioner; independent group of American leaders conducting a national dialogue on the policies needed to restore and protect marine ecosystems in US waters</LI><LI>David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Trustee</LI><LI>National Academy of Sciences, Member, elected 1996</LI><LI>Communication Partnership for Science and the Sea (COMPASS), Principal</LI><LI>Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences' Beijer Institute of Environmental Economics, Board of Directors</LI><LI>Environmental Defense, Trustee</LI><LI>SeaWeb, Director
</LI><LI>Monterey Bay Aquarium, Trustee </LI>[/list]<H3>Other Honors, Offices</H3><UL><LI>American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), President, 1997-98</LI><LI>Ecological Society of America, President, 1992-94</LI><LI>American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Member</LI><LI>American Philosophical Society, Member, elected 1998
</LI><LI>James D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow, 1993-98</LI><LI>Heinz 2002 Environmental Award</LI><LI>Golden Plate Award, 2001</LI><LI>Howard Vollun Award, 2001</LI><LI>David B. Stone Award, 1999</LI><LI>Honorary Degrees: Drexel University, 1992; Colorado College, 1993; Bates College, 1997; Unity College, 1998; Southampton College, Long Island University, 1999; Princeton University, 2001; Plymouth State College, 2002</LI><LI>8 Science Citation Classics Papers
</LI><LI>Pew Scholar Award, 1992-95
</LI>[/list]

<A name=interests></A><H3>Research Interests</H3><BLOCKQUOTE><UL><LI>sustainability science</LI><LI>marine reserves
</LI><LI>evolutionary ecology of individuals, populations and communities</LI><LI>biodiversity, conservation biology, and global change</LI><LI>community structure, organization and stability</LI><LI>biogeography</LI><LI>foraging strategies and life histories</LI><LI>plant-herbivore interactions</LI><LI>rocky intertidal communities</LI><LI>chemical ecology, algal ecology, marine ecology</LI><LI>molluscs, echinoderms, seaweeds</LI>[/list]</BLOCKQUOTE><H3>Science, Conservation, and Education Interests</H3><BLOCKQUOTE><UL><LI>science and the environment</LI><LI>public understanding of science</LI><LI>marine conservation biology</LI><LI>ecosystem services</LI><LI>ecological causes and consequences of global change</LI>[/list]</BLOCKQUOTE>

<A name=recentpubs></A><H3>Recent Representative Publications</H3><BLOCKQUOTE>

Lubchenco, Jane, R. Davis-Born, B. Simler, 2002. Lesson from the Land for the Protection of the Sea: The Need for a New Ocean Ethic . Open Spaces 5:10-19.

Lubchenco, Jane, S.R. Palumbi, S.D. Gaines, S. Andelman, 2002. Plugging a Hole in the Ocean: The Emerging Science of Marine Reserves. Ecological Applications Special Issue, in press.

Allison, G.W., S.D. Gaines, J. Lubchenco, H.P. Possingham, 2002. Ensuring persistence of marine reserves: Catastrophes require adopting an insurance factor. Ecological Applications, in press.

Menge, B.A., E. Sanford, B.A. Daley, T.L. Freidenburg, G. Hudson, and J. Lubchenco, 2002. An Inter-hemispheric comparison of bottom-up effects on community structure: insights revealed using the comparative-experimental approach. Ecological Research 17:1-16.

Naylor, R.L. et. al., 2000. Effect of aquaculture on world fish supplies. Nature 405:1017-1024.


Dasgupta, P., S. Levin, J. Lubchenco, 2000. Economic pathways to ecological sustainability: Challenges for the new millenium. Bioscience 50:339-345.

Daily, G.C. et al., 1999. The Value of Nature and the Nature of Value. Science 289: 395-396.


Menge, B.A., B.A. Daley, J. Lubchenco, E. Sanford, E. Dahlhoff, P.M. Halpin, G. Hudson, and J. Burnaford, 1999. Top-down or bottom-up regulation of New Zealand rocky intertidal communities. Ecological Monographs 69:297-330.

National Science Board, 1999. Environmental science and engineering for the 21st Century: The role of the National Science Foundation. Report NSB 99-133. [url]http://www.nsf.gov/nsb/tfe/nsb99133[/url] . (J. Lubchenco chaired the Task Force, which drafted the report).

Allison, G.W., J. Lubchenco, and M. Carr, 1998. Marine reserves are necessary but not sufficient for marine conservation. Ecol. Applications 8:S79-S92.

Lubchenco, J., 1998. Entering the century of the environment: A new social contract for science. Science 279:491-497.
[url]http://sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/279/5350/491[/url]


Naylor, R., R. Goldburg, H. Mooney, M. Beveridge, J. Clay, C. Folke, N. Kautsky, J. Lubchenco, J. Primavera, M. Williams, 1998. Nature's subsidies to shrimp and salmon farming. Science 282:883-884.

Vitousek, P.M., H.A. Mooney, J. Lubchenco, and J.M. Melillo, 1997. Human domination of earth's ecosystems. Science 277:494-499.</BLOCKQUOTE></DIV><DIV class=links>» 33904 reads</DIV></DIV>
 

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Dr. Lubencho's past relationships/positions with PEW and EDF are an excellent illustration of how the US government can be affected bywell funded lobby groups as their salaried personnelmake govenment connections and move in and out of government positions. Funny how EDF is now at the fishery council table and is an SOS plan backer, looks like an environmental group planput into action to me.

Mark W
 

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markw4321 (10/30/2009) Funny how EDF is now at the fishery council table and is an SOS plan backer, looks like an environmental group planput into action to me.

Mark W
And I wonder if these charter captains that back SOS even realize that they may bepart of a greater plan by the environmentalists. EDF sawthese captains grasping at straws and knew that they would jump at anything they say if they put on a show like they are there to help them save their sector.:banghead:banghead

These SOS backers may just be puppets on a string without even knowing it.
 

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Telum Pisces (10/30/2009)
markw4321 (10/30/2009) Funny how EDF is now at the fishery council table and is an SOS plan backer, looks like an environmental group planput into action to me.

Mark W
And I wonder if these charter captains that back SOS even realize that they may bepart of a greater plan by the environmentalists. EDF sawthese captains grasping at straws and knew that they would jump at anything they say if they put on a show like they are there to help them save their sector.:banghead:banghead

These SOS backers may just be puppets on a string without even knowing it.
I could not agree more!
 

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They are pawns and most don't even know it. EDF and PEW will throw them away like a spent condom when they are done with them.

Mark W
 

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Ditto. Sometimes you don't have to be an intellectual genius to know how to fish. Must feel great to be ignorant to the fact that you're just a pawn.

Chris
 
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