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I haven't been running offshore for very long and haven't seen a whole lot. Figured some of you salty veterans would have some killer stories.
 

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I know the feeling, the first time I took mine out the steering cable busted in the bay at night coming home from dinner. Had the wife with me, she was about to freak out. I've got twins so we made it home by working the throttles.
 

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we had to get the guys that do the para-sailing stuff at the flora bama to come tow us in with their inflatable boat. i wasnt too happy...but the guy i bought it from helped pay to get it fixed which was great...:clap very nice guy
 

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This one is a crazy experience, I had repaired a damaged bass boat, we were excited to use the boat after I had worked on it for 1.5 years! Ihad to replace the entire steering assy, we lauched the boat, left the dock &and the steering was backwards ! I was determined to use the boat that day, so I learned how to steer it backwards, turn the wheel left to go right !! It was a easy fix after I got it back home,,,
 

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This is copied from my post (Sept. 2007)on the old forum when I almost sunk my boat.

Ok, now that yesterday is over, I can breath a sigh of relief and talk about the situation. I have a 1802 Trophy WA. I am the second owner of this boat. Yesterday was rough as hell but we went out to Ft. McRae anyway. Well we decided to put in at the old Nichols Seafood ramp over here in Milton and make the long journey to McRae. I live in Milton. Well about the time I passed NAS Pensacola, I had to pull the throttle back a bit to slow down because the chop was getting a little much for my boat. And I noticed the boat was running a bit sluggish. As a slowed down, all of sudden I felt water come rushing by my feet. I look back and about pissed myself.
There is water (about 4" worth)on the back portion of thedeck. This means that my entire bilge is full underneath the deck. The 1802 Trophy's are not a self bailing deck. I throttle back and then think, what the hell am I doing throttling back. I should be heading to the nearest shore NOW. Try to power back up on plane and she almost does not make it back on plane due to the weight of the water in my boat and I had to leave the helm and go to the bow just to get back on plane. Then I make it to Ft. Pickens and beach the entire boat. Open my cabin only to find a foot or more of water in there also. The bilge was going but wasn't doing it's job good enough. Reach down into the bilge only to find a bunch of junk in my bilge pump. Clean that out and the water finally starts to go down. It took over 20 minutes to get all that water out.

Now, where the hell did that water come from. I wasn't about to go anywhere without knowing where the water was coming from. Well the previous owner had re-rigged a washdown pump at one time. The pump no longer worked, so he simply pluged the hose coming from the pickup underneath the boat. Well, because of the beating I took from the choppy waters, that makeshift plug that was in that hose came out and the water pickup underneath just started to fill up my boat from who knows when on my trip yesterday.

Got the water out, pluged the hose with a more permanent solution and enjoyed the rest of the day at McRae with the family.

I never again want that sinking feeling while on a boat. That was the worst day on the water that I have had yet and hopefully I will not have to experience something like that agian on the water. So just a friendly reminder to check all avenues of water entry into your boat often, like livewells, raw water washdowns, etc...
 

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Batteries shorted out 40 miles out of Ft. Pierce around10pm once. Seas were calm but quickly got really rough and we were in the middle of some nasty thunderstorms. Around 4 am, the Coast Guard finally got us a tow. It was a long tow ride back in 7' seas but I put out a wahoo line anyways and got a cuda.:sick
 

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I will copy and paste as well:

<SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">Woke up a little before <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:smarttags" /><st1:time Hour="4" Minute="0"><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">4:00a.m.</st1:time><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA"> and started to get the boat ready. We left out with a crew of 4-My Dad, His friend Mike, my uncle James and me. We had a dozen live pinfish waiting for us in a trap and we had bought a box of squid from Outcast on the way to the ramp. On the way out in the morning, the wind was not blowing at all and there was just a little bit of residual swell coming from the south. So we decided to head out to the Yellow Gravel area after some big Grouper. We ran into a dense bank of fog on the way out that slowed us down a bit. I guess it was a bit of foreshadowing that the swells in the fog looked huge because you could not see them coming to well but they were really pretty small. We made through the fog then it cleared up for a while then we hit another patch of fog that was not that bad as we approached the spot about 40 miles out. When we stopped the wind and current were not doing anything so we decided to drift instead of anchoring since the boat was not moving hardly at all. As I was getting things ready they all dropped down some pinfish and the bite was on immediately. My dad hooked up on a monster grouper that pulled the 6/0 out of the gimble and the butt of the rod flew up and knocked him in the jaw and he barely was able to hang on to the rod. He got it off the bottom a little ways and the hook pulled, both of the other guys lost fish as well. So I moved the boat back over the spot and we all dropped down but this time nothing was doing so we tried to catch some bigger baits with little success. Well the wind picked up from the South so we decided to anchor. We could not get a consistent drift but we had a bunch of rocks marked in the same area so we kept moving the anchor around to get on the spots. We finaly caught a couple 1.5 to 2.5lb Mingo's for bait and as soon as one hit the bottom a big Grouper would be on but it was just not our day as they kept getting off. Well we decided to run about 10 miles North to another ledge in the Yellow Gravel area where we knew that we could at least catch some bait to fish with. As we approached the spot the cold front was bearing down on us. It was pretty amazing to see, it was clear and sunny where we were but the front was coming quickly from the West as a straight wall of clouds. We slowed down enough to feel that the wind had shifted from the South at about 5 knots to North at about 20 knots with gust to 30 and a large change in temperature so I layed the hammer down headed for home. Once we got about 22 miles from the pass the wave had gotten just plane nasty and we were in way over our heads. The waves werethe biggest I've ever been inand verrrrry steep. We took 100 or so waves over the bow with about a dozen being bad enough to go over the bow up the cabin over the windsheild and dump several gallons of water on my head as I was driving at a speedy 4mph. All it would of taken was 1 mistake and it would have been all over. We did not get out of the real bad waves untill we got about 8 miles from the beach and let me tell you that was the most intense 14 miles of my life. My dad was puking in the back of the boat because it was way to dangerous to get it over the side. The next 7 miles were sloppy to say the least but gave a little more room for error, and we were not able to run good untill we got about .25 miles from the beach. The whole way in I kept hearing my crew talk about being freezing but I had to much adrenaline pumping to get cold the only way I knew it was cold is because my jaw was freezing up not wanting to move. But in the end we made it in withangels <SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">over our shoulders. Final tally for the day 4 very releived guys with 1 Gag Grouper, 2 Mingos, and 2 Scamps and my dad caught and released our first moray eel. This morning I feel fine other than a sunburn and some sore muscles. I need to call my dad and check on his jaw as he took a pretty good shot that was still hurting him when we got home. Other then that I am ready to go again hopefully next time with some better seas.<BR style="mso-special-character: line-break"><BR style="mso-special-character: line-break">
 

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My dad chaged Transducer's on my boat( 21 step V) while I was at work & met him at sherman cove, jumped in & headed out, once on the spot about 13 mi south east all was good unti I noticed water in the step, Not thinking much about it kept fishing until we noticed the battery floating, flipped the bildge on & fired it up , the boat was so heavy it would not plain, it was a long ride in but we made it, ended up putting a water hose in the boat & filling until we found the leak at the screw holes where the dummy had taken the transducer off.:banghead sorry dad.
 

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Struck buy lighting,

Happened about5-6 years ago I was deck-handing on the Reel Eazy, We had a 8 hr charter. We were holding up over our first spot waiting for the downpour of rain to stop so we could make a drop, I was in the pilot house with Buddyand BANG! Sounded like a 12 gage going off right next to my ear, at the same time saw a bolt of electricity go over me and Buddy's head , ears were ringing could not hear a thing me and Buddy just looked at each other in shock, and it immediately killed the electronics and engines. We smelled smoke it was the brain box to the single side ban totally melted. Ran down stairs to check on the charter guests everyone was O.K. We lost all electronics, but were able to restart the engines. Had a handheld GPS as a backup we went to a large wreck that we new the #s were right on and anchored up on the # and caught our limit of snapper and went home . That is one of many close calls that sticks out in my head............
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Man I've been on the gulf and had to run around thunderstorms with lightning, but I probly would have shat on myself if it were to hit the boat. Had a teacher in high school that ran boats had his boat struck, his experience was the same.
 

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Several years ago, I'm running a wellcraft center console headed to some short holes. Got to the spot and noticed water on the deck, my heart sank ionto my drawers. Pulled ancor fired her up and headed in. After the boat gets on plane I hang myself over the transom with my head through the swim platform builge access only to see no water??? I back off the throttle to find water draining out one scupper but not the other??? Turns out a coke bottle top had fallen in the scupper and was letting water in but not out like a check valve or something. I breath a sigh of relief and break out the plyers and avert a major catastophy:letsdrink
 

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April of 2006, three of us were fishing west of Destin in 2-3' seas. We headed back inearly afternoon, angling into the waves. It wasn't dangerous sea conditions, just a bit unconfortable because of the angle of the waves. My friend Bill was sitting on my extra-big ice chest in the middle of the boat. He washolding onto the rope/dowel handle like you would hold onto a mechanical bull. The chest was loaded with fish and ice, and very heavy.

We were running just on plane, around 17 knots. WhenI passed over one wave, the bow darted away from the next wave. I heard the ice chest sliding, andturned to seeBill going over the starboard side of the boat. I threw the throttle into the neutral position, then into reverse and lots of throttle. It seemed like forever, but we stopped in a matter of seconds.

Bill's left leg was still in the boat, wedged between the ice chest and the side of the boat. The rest of him was in the water, his head and shoulders under water. We pulled him up enough to be able to breath, then freed the trapped leg. Bill had had both shoulder joints replaced, so we couldn't pick him up by his arms. We finally pulled/twisted him inside the boat. :clap

I came very close to loosing a close friend.

It was a freaky accident, but could have been avoided.:nonono

Sea-r-cy

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Discussion Starter #17
my buddy had that happen once, not quite as bad though, my old arse boat aint got none dem.
 

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PBGFC Jr. Anglers Tournament 2006

Vessel...Bodacious

I remember sitting in the bar in the Oyster Bar with Kevin watching the Weather Channel before the Captains meeting. Saw a little line of showers moving to the SW from around Montgomery to Jacksonville. Didn't look too intimidating. I remember me and Kevin talking about how it shouldn't be too bad. Should move on through and be nice. Figured an hour or so of bumping around. Nothing serious. After the meeting we headed out to the Spur, gonna see if we could nail a sword first night out. All the way out lightning was popping off to the NE. We didn't think about putting the Weather Channel on....should have. Arrived on station at the Spur at 2300.Radarwas showing a narrow line to the NNE. Lightning was really starting to pick up about 10-12 miles north.After we stopped, Creech went down to get a shower. I stayed on the helm while Hal, Doug and Trip put 2 lines out. By the time Jeremy got back up on the bridge, the radar was marking the line at about 4-5 miles. After a quick discussion, we decided to get the lines in and move SE. The stern was facing the north. Seas were just short of glassy calm. Still clear overhead. While clearing lines, there was a fresh breeze form the north picked up to about 10 knots pretty fast. At that point the temperature dropped about 30 degrees in about 3 seconds."Oh shit!.....Ya'll get everything latched down!!" At that point the wind went to about 30-40 knots. We were running 20-25 knots south and the wind was blowing so hard it took 2 of us to zip the enclosures up, one to hold and one to zip! It was gettingreal ugly, real fast.The radar was still showing the line being only 2 miles thick or so. After trying to go SE around the end of it, it started wrapping us. At that point, we decided to turn around and go into it. We were listening to a couple of the other boats on the radio and they were reporting it wasn't too awfully bad just going into it. Seas went from flat toaround 8 foot best we could tell. That's conservative. Wehad waves blowing over the hardtop of the boat. But, what really was frightning was the lightning. I haveNEVER seen itthat bad, never! I'm talking about the flash/boom beingsimoutaneous.Me and Jeremy were taking turns on the wheel.You couldn't see 50 foot any direction. Water would fill the cockpit with about8-10 inches of water when we went down a wave face andblow out the scuppers on the way up the next. Doug was sitting on the bridge with me and puked a fine cloud of brown down the side. It was washed away instantly. Hal was down below asleep. That amazed me. Slept right through it. One thing we found out, the radar was not burning through the rain it was so heavy. Along about nowthere was a short exchange..."Jeremy? You been doing this longer than me...you been in this kinda stuff before...right?"..."No, this is about as bad as I been in Wade".. (ME).."We gonna F'n die".. This went on for 3-4 hours. About 0330 the waves felt like they were starting to ease up a bit. The rain slacked up enough to see a mile or so in the flashes. There were 2 boats, one to port and one to starboard less than a mile away. First time we had a clue they were there!! We decided to kick the boat over on a 120 heading. Still raining pretty good at this time, but ahell of alot better than it was. About 0430 I could see a little tiny light spot on the horizon. I headed towards it. It was down to 3-5 seas now and the rainhad slacked off to regular portions. The worse was over. We put lines in and started fishing as soon as we could see what we were doing.We punched out the backside around 0545. Seas calmed down to glass in a couple hours. Amazing. When the line had reached the gulf, it blew up.When the boatgot stable enoughfor thesat tv to work, we put it on theWeather Channel. They were talking about naming the damn storm!!! Late that evening when we got back in close enough to recieve cell calls, all ofus had messages. The Coast Gaurd was looking for us and 2 other vessels. Found out they called the tournament off at 2300. Wound up weighing in and still winning a categeory. Made it in safe and sound though.
 
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