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These guys down here on 30-A are organizing a big protest to the pending offshore oil drilling off the Florida coast. I am asking for fellow sportsman/residents to come and show that not all Floridians are against the economic growth and sporting opportunities that these proposed rigs wouldallow !!I would venture to say that none of these bandwagon hippie type folks know anything or have ever even seen an offshore rig. Louisiana is now the 3rd largest seafood producer in the nation because of what ??? Oil rigs (operational and non operational) according to recent LSU studies...

So please come help as the local news stations will be there. We need to let our government know that the MAJORITY of Floridians support the drilling and what they would do for our economy and fisheries....... Lets meet at the courtyard across the street from Bud and Ally's(owner of Bud and Ally's is the organizer)on 30-A in Seaside.. Please help !!!!! Bring signs, scientific data(fliers to hand out), most importantly yourself !!!!Most of these protesters are second homeowners or recent transplants to the area.. Let the news/govt know they are not the majority !!!!<H2></H2><H2>HERE IS THE OPPOSING SIDES Mission Statement (copied from hands across the sand website) not my views !!!!</H2><H2>Mission Statement</H2>
  1. <LI>To raise awareness about pending Florida legislation to drill for oil in our coastal waters. <LI>To organize a statewide coastal movement to protest this legislation. This protest will bring thousands of Florida's citizens to our beaches and will draw metaphorical and actual lines in the sand; human lines in the sand against near shore oil drilling in our waters. This event will be held on Saturday February 13, 2010. <LI>To convince our Legislators and Governor to drop any and all Legislation that would allow this folly. </LI>
 

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Sorry Bud. I support pristine gulf water, pristine white beaches, pristine clear bays and bayous.Ihave absolutely no problem catching fish at will! Oil industry does not mix with a tourist based economy. Although rigs would be beneficial to the fishermen it has the potential to damage the number one income producing industry...tourism.
 

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Well no offense but I guess go hold hands with the hippies.... Read here my friend... Sorry the videos and links did not make it when I copied this document...

On Earth Day, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu and Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis wanted to make Obama's energy policy perfectly clear:


"If we are going to create clean energy industry jobs in this country," they write in a widely syndicated op-ed, "break the stranglehold that foreign oil has on our economy and punish the polluters who are devastating our natural resources, then we've got to be honest about the difficult tasks and tough choices ahead. It's going to mean telling the special interests that their days of dictating energy policy in this country are over."


Indeed, and we can start with groups like the Sierra Club.


"Environmentalists" wake up in the middle of the night sweating and whimpering about offshore oil platforms only because they've never seen what's under them. Louisiana produces almost 30 per cent of America's commercial fisheries. Only Alaska (ten times the size of the Bayou state) produces slightly more. So obviously, Louisiana's coastal waters are immensely rich and prolific in seafood.


These same coastal waters contain 3,200 of the roughly 3,700 offshore production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. These oil production platforms off the Bayou state's coasts also extract 80 percent of the oil and 72 percent of the natural gas produced in the Continental U.S., without causing a single major oil spill in half a century of this process. This record stands despite dozens of hurricanes -- including the two most destructive in North American history, Camille and Katrina -- repeatedly battering the drilling and production structures. So for those interested in evidence over hysterics, by simply looking bayou-ward, a lesson in the "environmental perils" of offshore oil drilling presents itself very clearly.


Fashionable Florida, on the other hand, which zealously prohibits offshore oil drilling, had its gorgeous "Emerald Coast" panhandle beaches soiled by an ugly oil spill in 1976. This spill, as almost all oil spills, resulted from the transportation of oil -- not from the extraction of oil.


Assuming such as Hugo Chavez deign to keep selling us oil, we'll need increasingly more and we'll need to keep transporting it stateside -- typically to refineries in Louisiana and Texas. This path takes those tankers (as the one in 1976) smack in front of Florida's panhandle beaches. Recall the Valdez, the Cadiz, the Argo Merchant. These were all tanker spills.


The production of oil is relatively clean and safe. Again, it's the transportation that presents the greatest risk. And even these spills (though hyped hysterically as environmental catastrophes) always play out as minor blips, those pictures of oil-soaked seagulls notwithstanding. To the horror and anguish of professional greenies, Alaska's Prince William Sound recovered completely. More birds get fried by landing on power lines and smashed to pulp against picture windows in one week than perished from three decades of oil spills.


For fear of oil spills, as of 2009, the U.S. Federal government and various states ban drilling in thousands upon thousands of square miles off the U.S. Coast. These areas, primarily on the Outer Continental Shelf, hold an estimated 115 billion barrels of oil and 633 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. This leaves America 's energy needs increasingly at the mercy of foreign autocrats, despots and maniacs. All the while worldwide demand for oil ratchets ever and ever upward.


The proliferation of marine life around oil production platforms turned on its head every "environmental expert" opinion of its day. The original plan, mandated by federal environmental "experts" back in the late '40s, was to remove the big, ugly, polluting, environmentally hazardous contraptions as soon as they stopped producing. Fine, said the oil companies.


About 15 years ago some wells played out off Louisiana and the oil companies tried to comply. Their ears are still ringing from the clamor fishermen put up. Turns out those platforms are going nowhere, and by popular demand of those with a bigger stake in the marine environment than any "environmentalist." Every "environmental" superstition against these structures was turned on its head.


Marine life had exploded around these huge artificial reefs: A study by LSU's Sea Grant college shows that 85 percent of Louisiana fishing trips involve fishing around these platforms. The same study shows 50 times more marine life around an oil production platform than in the surrounding Gulf bottoms. An environmental study (by apparently honest scientists) revealed that urban runoff and treated sewage dump 12 times the amount of petroleum into the Gulf than those thousands of oil production platforms. And oil seeping naturally through the ocean floor into the Gulf, where it dissipates over time, accounts for 7 times the amount spilled by rigs and pipelines in any given year.


The Flower Garden coral reefs lie off the Louisiana-Texas border. Unlike any of the Florida Keys reefs, they're surrounded by dozens of offshore oil platforms. These have been pumping away for the past 50 years. Yet according to G.P. Schmahl, a Federal biologist who worked for decades in both places, "The Flower Gardens are much healthier, more pristine than anything in the Florida Keys. It was a surprise to me," he admits. "And I think it's a surprise to most people."


"A key measure of the health of a reef is the amount of area taken up by coral," according to a report by Steve Gittings, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's science coordinator for marine sanctuaries. "Louisiana's Flower Garden boasts nearly 50 percent coral cover. In the Florida Keys it can run as little as 5 percent."


Mark Ferrulo, a Florida "environmental activist" uses the very example of Louisiana for his anti-offshore drilling campaign, calling Louisiana's coast "the nation's toilet." Florida's fishing fleet must love fishing in toilets, and her restaurants serving what's in them. Most of the red snapper you eat in Florida restaurants are caught around Louisiana's oil platforms. We see the Florida-registered boats tied up to them constantly. Sometimes us locals can barely squeeze in.


In 1986 Louisiana started the Rigs to Reef program, a cooperative effort by oil companies, the feds and the state. This program literally pays the oil companies to keep the platforms in the Gulf. Now some platforms are simply cut off at the bottom and toppled over as artificial reefs; over 60 have been toppled thus far.


A few years back, Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries officials were invited to Australia to help them with a similar program. Think about it: here's Australia, the nation with the Great Barrier Reef, the world's biggest natural reef, the world's top dive destination -- they're asking help from "the nation's toilet" about developing exciting dive sites by using the very structures that epitomize (in greenie eyes) environmental disaster.


Amongst the greenie scoffers of the environmental bonanza described above were some The Travel Channel producers, fashionably greenish in their views. They read these claims in a book titled "The Helldiver's Rodeo." The book described an undersea panorama that (if true) could make an interesting show for the network, they concluded, while still scoffing.


They scoffed as we rode in from the airport. They scoffed over raw oysters, grilled redfish and seafood gumbo that night. More scoffing through the Hurricanes at Pat O'Brien's. They scoffed even while suiting up in dive gear and checking the as we tied up to an oil platform 20 miles in the Gulf.


But they came out of the water bug-eyed and indeed produced and broadcast a program showcasing a panorama that turned on its head every environmental superstition against offshore oil drilling. Schools of fish filled the water column from top to bottom -- from 6-inch blennies to 12-foot sharks. Fish by the thousands. Fish by the ton.


The cameras were going crazy. Do I focus on the shoals of barracuda? Or that cloud of jacks? On the immense schools of snapper below, or on the fleet of tarpon above? How 'bout this - WHOOOAA - hammerhead!


We had some close-ups, too, of coral and sponges, the very things disappearing off Florida's (that bans offshore oil drilling) pampered reefs. Off Louisiana, they sprout in colorful profusion from the huge steel beams -- acres of them. You'd never guess this was part of that unsightly structure above.


The panorama of marine life around an offshore oil platform staggers anyone who puts on goggles and takes a peek, even (especially!) the most worldly scuba divers. Here's a video peek at this seafood bonanza: America desperately needs more domestic oil. In the process of producing it, we'd also get dynamite fishing, dynamite diving, and a cheaper tab for broiled red snapper with shrimp topping.


If a picture's worth a thousand words of proof, then this video should be worth ten million.
 

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<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">I?m with you <U>Santarosafisherman.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p></U>
 

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If this is the legislation to put Oil Rigs close enough to shore that you'll see them when down at the beach then I have no use for them. We have some of the most beautiful beaches in the world and it would be incriminating to put oil rigs offshore where you could see them. Put all of them you want out past 20 miles and I wouldn't care but keep them form being seen from the beach.
 

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I?m with you also <U>Santarosafisherman.</U> It is time that we quit givingmoney to the terrorist Nations that hate us and want us dead. We can either start now or wait until we have no choice because Opec holds all the cards right now and we are at their mercy.
 

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MGuns (2/8/2010)<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">I?m with you <U>Santarosafisherman.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p></o:p></U>
<P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt"><P class=MsoNormal style="MARGIN: 0in 0in 0pt">Thank you sir !! Hope to see ya down there !
 

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lobsterman (2/8/2010)I?m with you also <U>Santarosafisherman.</U> It is time that we quit givingmoney to the terrorist Nations that hate us and want us dead. We can either start now or wait until we have no choice because Opec holds all the cards right now and we are at their mercy.
Now thats what I'm talkin bout !!! Thanks man !
 

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Aaron/all,

I support drilling holes and extracting natural recourses. I will do my best to be there, however I don't know where or what I will be doing in the next 10 minutes.

Now, with that said,

Think before we all react to this. Our area (NW Florida) depends on tourists, tourist are not bringing the money we all need to survive anymore. Think of this in a different way:

1 - JOBS, put people to work, fishing, platform workers, on and on.

2 - Stop relying on overseas resources, there will be drilling off our shores sooner or later, wanna wait until you see China's flags off our coast (9 miles out)? Keep OUR money here in the US, stop buying stuff we already have......

3 - I believe with the technology that exists, there is MINIMAL threat to our waters/shores.

Sand is sand, the economical climateis what we all live for in one way or another, no new jobs equals "status quo", or sliding and it wont stop. Here is yet another o<SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">pportunity to grow, the way I see it is, we either get involved and do it right, or wait for the stick. Most of the dirty water off LA is from the Mississippi river delta (right?)

Just my 2 cents, I support drilling, it's 2010, not like the oil companies don't know what they are doing.
 

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Realtor (2/8/2010)Aaron/all,

I support drilling holes and extracting natural recourses. I will do my best to be there, however I don't know where or what I will be doing in the next 10 minutes.

Now, with that said,

Think before we all react to this. Our area (NW Florida) depends on tourists, tourist are not bringing the money we all need to survive anymore. Think of this in a different way:

1 - JOBS, put people to work, fishing, platform workers, on and on.

2 - Stop relying on overseas resources, there will be drilling off our shores sooner or later, wanna wait until you see China's flags off our coast (9 miles out)? Keep OUR money here in the US, stop buying stuff we already have......

3 - I believe with the technology that exists, there is MINIMAL threat to our waters/shores.

Sand is sand, the economical climateis what we all live for in one way or another, no new jobs equals "status quo", or sliding and it wont stop. Here is yet another o<SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Arial; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">pportunity to grow, the way I see it is, we either get involved and do it right, or wait for the stick. Most of the dirty water off LA is from the Mississippi river delta (right?)

Just my 2 cents, I support drilling, it's 2010, not like the oil companies don't know what they are doing.




THANKS JIM !!!
 

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santarosafisherman,

first of all, since this was your first post, I would like to know who you are....while I support oil rigs off the coast of FL, I would like them out of visual range. I've spent alot of yrs fishing the rigs off AL, MS and LA and would like to see them off the FL coast but before I go randomly supporting a brand newanonymous screen name on a forum....I want to know more.......the reason I say this is because after doing an IP search, it comes back to other members of the forum........
 

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ok, before everyone gets in an uproar about this one, I've spoken with the individual and will be deleting one of the profiles when I get home from work this evening and leaving the <U>santarosafisherman</U> profile......situation explained and appears to be on the up and up to me......
 

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I am AGAINST it

there is no benifit for us haveing an eye sore off our beaches. So maybe it would give you a few more places to fish. If you want to fish rigs take a short trip over to Alabama.



Guess who is one of the biggest protestors.

The military. They are going to expand their operations here. That is definate revenue. But they have made it clear that if oil rigs are allowed off the beaches they will not be expanding their operations and will likely pull a lot of what they already have in place. That would be a huge economic loss. The military is a reason Pensacola is what it is.



People visit here for the beautiful beaches. You will end that real fast by putting ugly oil platforms out there.



How do you see it as a benifit to Pensacola ? Do you think they will start giving you free gas? Are they going to give all of us jobs? Oh wait. You will now have another place to fish. Do you realize how many reefs there are in the gulf? Fish those. Everytime I go fishing I find more numbers. I have close to 1000. All you have to do is look for them.



Also Louisiana did not become a large supplier of sea food because they put oil rigs out in their waters. That is a dumb statement. I think maybe it has something to do with the delta flowing in there maybe?



Don't think you will come on here and promise everyone that oil rigs are going to produce more fish and they will all get in line with you to ruin our beaches. Even if it did produce more fish, we can't keep them anyway.
 

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I'm not sure where you got your info about the military sniper, I am a retired Navy controller and DOD civilian Air Traffic Controller here at NAS Pensacola and we own the offshore airspace from Mobile to FWB out to about 110 miles offshore and that's news to me.....I've been in this job since '94 and never heard that stance on behalf of the military.....matter of fact because we have all the way over to Mobile, there are quite a lot of offshore rigs already in our area of responsability......it's all a Warning Area (W-155) and they exist offshore, ran by military and are all along the gulf coast everywhere from South FL to South TX.....

like I said before, I'm for the offshore rigs but really offshore....like 50 miles plus, I don't want to see one from our beautiful beaches.....in fact I would hate it if our beaches were scattered with them like it is off Dauphin Island.
 

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Jiggin Finatic
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I say make them 30 miles out so us little guys can reach a few also. it would have to be pretty darn tall to see from the beach at 30 miles out.
 

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The Air Force has let it be known that offshore drillng will adversely affect their operations in the area - primarily weapons testing and live fire exercises that are supposedly moving into the area. They've used the same reasoning to oppose the creation of new large scale artificial reef areas to our east.
 
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