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Consistently catching tournament quality bass is ridiculously difficult, much respect to those guys. Brant is pretty spot on about making money outside of tournaments. Much like the bass guys, consistently catching tournament winning redfish is pretty damn hard. Troy Perez won the IFA in Titusville three years in a row, only because the guy has been guiding there forever and knows where just about every single 7-8 pound redfish is at any given time. To win redfish tournaments, it will take you some serious time and money. Think about this - you're going to have to fish a large amount of water in areas you've never fished before. The IFA East Division this year includes Jacksonville, Fernandina and Titusville. How many, if any, of those have you fished? I hadn't fished any of them until last year, and it took a great deal of time and money to find some decent fish here and not so many there. Best of luck to you though, I would say stick to what Brant said and if you want to fish some local tournaments that are cheap and fun as hell and filled with cool people, definitely fish the Emerald Coast Redfish Club. www.theredfishclub.com
 

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cescofishes (1/17/2010) how old do you have to be.
If you gotta ask, you're probably naive.

cescofishes (1/17/2010)Thanks for the info guys. i am wanting to go pro in inshore or offshore,
LOL, well what other options do you have around here?

baitboy (1/18/2010)haha we get paid to fish and i love it
i have a couple friends down here that are practically pros at 16 and 17
i wanna get there someday but there is too much money in sellin bait to yal
I would hardly agree with your statement claiming that you get paid to fish. You (your dad) get paid to catch bait and turn around and sell it.You do NOT get paid tofish like the original poster is inquiring. And there is a big difference between "practically pros" and actual pros. That's like being "almost" pregnant.
 

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Sounds like entirely too much hassle to become a pro. Guess I'll stick with fishing for fun and entering the occassional local tournament. Not that I'm anywhere good enough to become a pro!!
 

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If your for fancy clothing and free gear and even just percentage off on gear. Im an angler for the University of South Alabama Bass Fishing Team. I fish on the FLWcollege circuit and Southern Collegiante. I have several bait sponsors that give me stuff for wearing there logo_One for example Abu Garcia gives me a$500 scholarship when i place in the top 5 and wear there logo on my jersey. College fishing is growing tons and if your looking at becoming pro theres no better place to start than on the college circuit. Here is our website even though it has not been updated in quite awhile

www.southalabama.edu/usabassfishing

also on facebook

<U>http://www.facebook.com/#/group.php?gid=8090129485&ref=ts</U>

some video

<U>
</U>http://www.southalabama.edu/usabassfishing
 

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Brant is on the money. I have a friend that's on his way to the big time with BASS. He is a guide here in Alabama, but what he does well is talk. He does product demostrations at Bass Pro Shops and boat shows all over the country. If you can move merchandise the manufaturers will get you in the tournments then you need to catch a few.

Someone else said catching tournament quality Bass is incrediable difficult is on the money as well. I fish lake Guntersville a lot and for those guys to average almost 6lbs per fish last year was crazy. As an amature I can go to Guntersville and put together 5 fish for maybe 15 to 20lbs. Which would be about 10lbs off the pace per day based on the Classic last year. On the other hand the Redfish Cup guys are limited to two fish in the slot which levels the field. I feel confident that if I had several days to pattern the fish I could come up with two qualityupper slot reds in 8 hours and I don't consider myself a good redfisher at all.I would think the odds ofbeing successful on theIFA or Redfish Cup would be much eaiser than BASS. Not to mention it's 1000 to 1 guys trying/wishing to make it on in BASS.
 

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I already said catching tournament bass was tougher, but seriously, catching two tournament winning redfish is not easy. Give it a try. In a lot of tournament scenarios there is no "patterning" the fish. Something else that comes into play in tournament redfishing that doesn't in bass tournaments is running across rough bays or making 100+ mile runs. I think fishing either one successfully is very difficult. There are guys that win more than others, but even then, there really isn't one dominant team on the IFA that wins every tournament, and the Broussards were the closest thing to a dominant team in the Cup. Just sayin', redfish tournaments are not easy, but I don't think there's any comparison really, it's saltwater and freshwater. The Redfish have a lot more places to hide. It's easy to boat two fish, but it is in no way easy to boat 14 lbs. of redfish, I don't care who you are.
 

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cescofishes (1/17/2010)How does someone become a pro angler. what do i need to do to become one. how old do you have to be.
First of all, let me start by saying that I can relate to everyone's point of view in this thread because I have been on all sides. I grew up as a pier rat on Navarre Pier and there is no questionit helped me with all the tournament success that I had in the past. Pier fishing teaches you to be quick and accurate with a rod and reel, as well as learning to sight fish, and learning to be competitive if you want to be successful. I fished the SKA when it first started and our team was extremely successful, including winning the BUD LITE tournament on several occasions as well as the Out Cast tournament and many others.Florida Game and Fish magazine named my brother and I as the top king fishermen in the Gulf of Mexico and there is no question that pier fishing helped us tremendously. But......as Brant stated, being successful doesn't mean you are going to get rich doing it. Only a select few actually make a bunch of money and almostall the pro anglers are working as sales reps for someone. (including all the big names). Our success came with a huge price. We just about worked ourselves to death and even with several sponsors we had to win some huge prizes to make ends meet. Garbo mentioned John Holly.... I fished many tournaments with John and he is the most hardcore fisherman I have ever fished with. Before you decide to become a pro angler, you might want to fish with John for a week and decide if it is worth it. He literallywill notsleep the entire week of a tournament. (and will keep you up working as well!) In 1986 I caught the winning king in the Pensacola Bud Lite tournament and instead of going to the weigh in early, John made us stay out and fish until we barely made it to the weigh in on time. (knowing that we had a winning fish on board) He stated that we might catch a bigger one! He stretches everything to the max but has been highly successful. Even with that, being a pro angler is not what payed his bills. Bottom line.... it is extremely hard, costly, and time consuming, yet winning was somehow fun and exciting. Hope this helps.
 

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At one time a person could be a "Professional Angler", now to make a living at it the same person has to be more of a 'Professional Marketer". It used to be about "Fishing", now it's about selling products and services and making money for sponsors. More or less the whole Idea of being a "Professional Angler" has become twisted into "howcan manufactures sell more products and services through someone" than how well can the person perform fishing. Mike Iaconelli is agood example of today's "Professional Fisherman". He has proven he can get attention and so he is a very marketable product, therefore he is attactive to sponsors that could care less if he can fish or not. More or less it would be very difficult to make a living just on one's Fishing Skills and Tallents in todays world.

Anywhere a group of like sportsman gather, there seems to always be some that want to profess they are great. It happens here.

John Holley is one Panhandle Angler could back it up based on accomplishment.
 
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