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Old 12-22-2010, 11:12 AM   #1
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Default Come on weather experts...

So yesterday I was fishing Escambia and like usual we were catching trout pretty steady. We got a late start around 7am and caught fish until 8ish. That's when we noticed a line of clouds from one end of the sky to the next float over. After that the bite was dead. Tried two more "honey holes" with no luck so packed it in.

Anyone care to explain what happened there? I assume it had something to do with the pressure changing, but why would the fish care? Thanks, just trying to learn something.
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Old 12-22-2010, 11:18 AM   #2
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The tide might have also begun its change and shut the fish down...but from what ive read and been told that when the pressure changes it messes with the fish's lateral line...and the lateral line in a fish is kind of like our ear drums...that when the pressure goes up they go dormant and when it drops it relieves them....and if it changes fairly quick it takes them a little while to adjust...i could be wrong but thats what ive been told and read
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Old 12-22-2010, 12:00 PM   #3
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I've read the same thing about that as well. Fish apparently will bite strong as the pressure is dropping until it bottoms out, then go dormant. When the pressure drops quickly it affects the micro-organisms (plankton) which turns on the baitfish feeding which will turn on the bigger fish etc.

Another theory is the lateral line/bladder theory. As the pressure drops fish will seek deeper water to balance out an expanding bladder. Who knows for sure. I will say that I've had more luck fishing deeper when the pressure has hit its low.
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Old 12-22-2010, 04:42 PM   #4
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Makes sense and thanks. Guess I need to pick up a barometer for the boat...
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Old 12-23-2010, 01:03 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe bag o donuts View Post
Makes sense and thanks. Guess I need to pick up a barometer for the boat...
nah....just go fishin! cant catch them at the house
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Old 12-24-2010, 01:55 AM   #6
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Normally I would agree, but it would be nice to know what days are going to be bad. Today for example. One dink red and no other hits. Fishing the same spots with the same tactics and more. Always learning...
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Old 12-24-2010, 11:39 PM   #7
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It's an inexact science. I went out twice today under what would be considered "ideal" conditions. This morning, very strong outgoing tide, got there early enough that the fish should still be there before the tide took them away. Nothing. Not even a bite. I didn't even see a fish.

Went out again tonight under better conditions. Very strong incoming tide with a falling barometer due to the incoming rain tomorrow. Again, waited until the tide was strong enough to bring the fish in. Same result. Not even a bite, just stood there in the dark like an idiot with the herons laughing at me. And these were at productive holes.

Who really knows why fish bite at times and why at other times they don't. I try not too read much into it. If I feel like fishing, I go fishing regardless of the time of day or the weather. I'm a firm believer that fish are catchable under any and all conditions, you just have to give them what they're asking for. Just because the tides are favorable and the barometer is at the right pressure doesn't mean that the fish will bite. I proved that today.

Last edited by rum cay; 12-24-2010 at 11:41 PM.
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Old 12-25-2010, 12:09 AM   #8
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Glad to know I'm not the only one who has those days.
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Old 12-25-2010, 03:23 AM   #9
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That's a common misconception that subtle changes in air pressure affect fish feeding.
It just ain't likely so

More than likely the line of clouds you mention had more to do with 'turning the bite off' than any change in the atmospheric pressure.
All of the subtle details (the amount of available light, water temperature and clarity or sediment, O2 levels, salinity, current speed, presence of baitfish, plankton, etc.) are what most likely affect fish biting.

Quote:
Misconceptions

Compared with changes in hydrostatic pressure---water pressure up or down within the water column---barometric pressure changes are very slight and not likely to be felt directly by the fish.
Expert Insight


Experts say fish likely are not reacting to barometric pressure changes but rather the effects of weather on the water. Weather following a change in barometric pressure can change light levels, water temperature and other factors affecting fish behavior. Fisheries biologist and tournament angler Roger Hugill says, "An extended period of stable weather allows fish to find their comfort zone---a balance of the right water temperature, oxygen, light penetration and other factors---and fuels a nice, steady bite."

Read more: How Does Barometric Pressure Affect Fish? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5009628_ba...#ixzz196pRGP6R

Last edited by Pier#r; 12-25-2010 at 03:25 AM.
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