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Old 01-24-2009, 10:27 PM   #11
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Default RE: "Modern Day" Heros.

Todd Beamer and the passengers of Flight 93 on Sept. 11 2001.

I only mention Todd by name,as he was a leader of an incredible group of Heros. The story is Awesome, the People that made were even more Awesome.

They had the stuff America was built on, and they were all Heros, without a doubt.
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Old 01-24-2009, 11:54 PM   #12
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Default RE: "Modern Day" Heros.

Ed Mireles, Ben Grogan, Jerry Dove and the other FBI agents involved in the April 11, 1986 shootout in Miami



These special agents, along with their colleagues, engaged in one of the most intense gun battles in the 98-year history of the FBI. In the end, two agents?Jerry Dove and Ben Grogan?were dead, five others were wounded, and two suspects were also killed.



The story of April 11, 1986, though, is not one just of tragedy?it is one of triumph and transformation as well. Those few minutes on that Friday morning have an impact on us to this day.



Now, it is important to remember that the shootout occurred in part because this team of special agents, led by Gordon McNeill, the supervisor, and Ben Grogan, the case agent, were very good at their jobs. They had developed critical information on two suspects in several bank robberies, shootings, and murders. They knew what car they were looking for and they knew when and in what area the suspects were most likely to strike. They were doing 20 years ago what we call intelligence and predictive analysis.



It was not an accident that our agents and the suspects encountered each other that day.



When they did collide, the professionalism and bravery of the agents was especially notable. They initiated the felony car stop that precipitated the gun battle in an area where the risk of harm to innocent civilians was lower. In the face of superior firepower, they stood together and defended each other.



After about five minutes and with more than 130 rounds fired between the two sides, it was Special Agent Mireles who, despite being severely wounded, ended the shootout as the suspects attempted to escape in an FBI car. For his actions, Ed Mireles was awarded the first ever FBI Medal of Valor.



Though the two suspects had been killed, we suffered our own devastating losses.



Then-FBI Director William Webster said it well about agents Dove and Grogan when he said that they "gave the last full measure of devotion." Dove, the Bureau rookie who long dreamed of working at the FBI, and Grogan, the 23-year veteran, died doing what they had been called to do?protecting the security of their fellow citizens.



There is no doubt that saving lives is what Dove and Grogan?and their colleagues?did that day. The suspects were responsible for as many as five previous murders, more shootings, and numerous robberies. They were an ominous threat to the community, and they were taken off the streets for good.



What also undoubtedly saved future lives were the lessons learned that day?lessons that transformed law enforcement tactics and training. Most immediately, special agents were issued semi-automatic handguns to replace the revolvers that many of the agents carried that day. Training for law enforcement officers also improved, as more realistic scenarios for firearms training were developed and the psychological effects of getting shot at were studied. We all owe a debt of gratitude to agents Mireles and McNeill for the work they have done in these areas.



April 11 remains truly a day of significance for the FBI and for law enforcement. And it remains a powerful reminder of the dangers we face, and of our capacity to do the extraordinary under the most extreme circumstances. Its impact, particularly on training and tactics for similar situations continues to this day.



Most of all, its outcome is a tribute to eight men who did their job and never wavered from their duty.
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Old 01-25-2009, 02:07 AM   #13
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Default RE: "Modern Day" Heros.

Kind of long but interesting.......

In the eyes of two pilots, one passenger, and 3 controllers I was a hero. To me it was just another day on the job, with a little kink involved.

Little background. I was a FPL (Full Performance Controller) on duty, about 2000hrs one January night, in 1980. I was assigned to GLH NRAC Greenville (MS)Non Radar Approach Control. We did everything a Radar Approach Control does but without the benefit of radar. We kept track of any IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) aircraft on paper as to position, time and altitude. I will never forget that night as long as I live, and have a memory.

What follows is basically the conservation between myself, ZME (Memphis Center) and an A/C that I don't recall his tail number as it was of no importance to me (we'll call him N-XXXX), at that time.

ZME.. GLH Approach, ZME, 94 line, inbound.

GLH.. ZME Center, GLH, go ahead.

ZME...Inbound Cherokee N-XXXX LTR (Little Rock) descending to 5,000', your control leaving 8...DW/VB (DW/VB were our operating initials.)(My control leaving 8 meant that I could descend and or turn the A/C once the pilot reported leaving 8,000'...my airspace ceiling was 5,000').

GLH... ZME, GLH 94 line.

ZME.. GLH, ZME go ahead.

GLH... Do you realize what my weather is? 1955Z weather is M200 overcast, 1/8 mile, wind calm. Intension's?

ZME... Landing

GLH... Do you realize my minimums are 327 and a half. Expect ILS (Instrument Landing System) Runway 18L. VB/DW (note: as a ATC we can not disapprove a approach.)

N-XXXX... GLH Approach this is Cherokee N-XXXX with you descending to 5,000

GLH... Cherokee N-XXXX GLH, GLH weather M200 overcast,visibility 1/8 mile, wind calm altimeter 2993. Cleared ILS Runway 18L approach, maintain 2000 until the initial approach fix, report initial approach fix inbound.

N-XXXX...N-XXXX roger, ILS 18L report initial fix inbound, copy weather.

Time passes.......

ZME... GLH ZME 94 line

GLH... ZME GLH go ahead

ZME...Do you know where N-XX is? He is 20 miles east of you (over Cleveland, MS), at 5,000"

GLH..ZME thank you,VB/DW

GLH... N-XX, ZME advises that you are 20 miles to the east of me. (LTR is about 80 miles to my NW). N-XX now cleared to the GLH VOR via direct, maintain 2000, report VOR outbound.

N-XXX... GLH ummm which way do I turn, what heading do I fly?

GLH.. N-XX turn left heading 270 until receiving GLH VOR direct. (I shouldn't have to tell him this.)

NOTE: The design of a ILS approach is a pie wedge shape with the point closest to the airport.Me notknowing he was low on fuel, he choose to stay at 5,000' and missed the confines of the approach.

ZME... GLH ZME 94 line.

GLH... GLH MEM go ahead.

ZME.. Did I tell you that N-XX may be low on fuel? He made 5 approaches into MEM, and we sent him to LTR where he made 5 there, weather too bad.

GLH.. Do you realize both MEM and LTR weather is better then mine?

ZME... Ahhh yes, but he couldn't get in.

GLH... You both have radar and what makes you think he can get in here.

ZME... low on fuel and had to send him somewhere.

NOTE: I know why they sent him to me, when he crashes in my airspace I'll have to go through all the shit.

GLH... N-XX say fuel state

N-XX... about 20 minutes

GLH... N-XX I'm declaring an emergency, say soles on board.

N-XX.. 2

GLH... N-XX will you need any assistance?

N-XX.. Yes I have problems. I'm low on fuel and have enough for maybe 1 approach. My Glide Slope on my ILS is not working and my marker beacons don't work.

NOTE: With the instruments he has he needs a VOR approach and the minimums are now 600' and a mile visibility. WTF do I do now...:banghead:banghead:banghead This SOB IS going to crash.

GLH.. N-XX I'll do what I can. Do I need to help you fly this approach?

N-XX..YES SIR

GLH... N-XX, I want you to understand that any instructions I give you are NON ATC approved, and compliance will be your risk, do you understand?

N-XX... YES SIR I understand

GLH... N-XX advise when you pick up GLH VOR and state air speed.

N-XX...I have GLH and doing 140

GLH.. N-XX roger, do not deviate from 140 at anytime and if you do advise, you understand?

N-XX.. YES SIR

GLH... N-XX when you cross over the GLH VOR, fly heading 360, descend and maintain 2000'. I'm going to time your approach for you so don't worry about figuring times.

N-XX..YES SIR

N-XX..VOR outbound.

GLH .. N-XX roger.

NOTE: at this point I use a stop watch and time 1 minute.

GLH... N-XX turn LEFT heading 315, report 2000.

N-XX.. heading 315 and we are at 2000.

GLH ...N-XX roger

NOTE: I time him outbound for another minute, before I turn him inbound.

GLH... N-XX Turn RIGHT heading 135, maintain 2000 until established on the localizer, maintain 600. (I flew many approaches into GLH and knew nothing out there at 600')

N-XX.. YES SIR

N-XX.. Established on localizer, descending to 6

GLH... N-XX cleared to land Rwy 18L

N-XX..YES SIR

NOTE: As N-XX was approaching the runway, and using a stop watch I started to stair step him down. When I figured he was about 1/2 mile from the runway I dropped him to 200" and he broke out over the approach lights and landed.

GLH...N-XX Taxi to the ramp.

N-XX..YES SIR....and that was the last two words I haver heard from him.

GLH...ZME GLH 94 line arrival, N-XXXX @ 2015 VB/DW

Another pilot in the air was listening to the whole ordeal, called my boss and told him I did one hell of a job. Time for tape review as all transmissions are recorded, both air and ground.

Got my ass chewed out the next day for using non ATC approved procedures.



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Old 01-25-2009, 02:35 AM   #14
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Default RE: "Modern Day" Heros.

Quote:
Blake (1/20/2009)

I think Sully did a great job, but I think most pilots would have done the exact same thing.

My dad is a Captain, head of flight training, and head of flight testing for one of the largest airlines in the world. We've discussed this at length from the time the plane hit the water. He was near 42nd street in NYC when this occurred, flying his own flight out of LGA later in the day.

The only option this pilot really had was to ditch into the Hudson.
Not to Monday morning quarterback, but after talking with a lot of my pilot buddies at work, he had a lot of time in the air before he ditched. Most dudes would have pulled a 180 and told ATC to make a whole because here we come. But he did do an awesome job putting it down. Ditching is the most dangerous way to put an airplane down.
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Old 01-25-2009, 09:31 AM   #15
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Default RE: "Modern Day" Heros.

Harrison Ford, yep the "Actor Hero" is for real heroat home. Below is an Article descibes a coupleof the events that his selfless acts of rescue has possibly saved others lives. He has plucked people off the Rocky Mountains in his personalhelicopter muchmore than a coupleof times.Harrison seems to cut from a different mold than the majority of what we call "Hollywood".

Harrison Ford is certainly no stranger to assuming the role of a hero. From Han Solo to Indiana Jones, Ford has created some of the most memorable and likeable heroes ever to appear on the big screen. Lately, however, Ford has been called upon to test his real-life valor, his flying skills in particular, in order to rescue people in the Rocky Mountains near his home in Jackson, Wyoming.

Ford, a part-time Jackson resident who routinely offers his flying skills and helicopter for rescue missions, joined a search for a missing Utah Boy Scout who had wandered off a trail Monday and spent a cold night alone in the secluded forest, said the Teton County Sheriff's Office in Wyoming. After two hours of searching, Ford and another rescuer found 13-year-old Cody Clawson, about 10 miles from a Boy Scout camp at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday. He landed nearby to whisk the soggy, cold, tired and hungry scout to safety.

This was not the first time that Ford has participated in a successful rescue mission. Last July, he plucked an Idaho Falls, Idaho, hiker off 11,106-foot Table Mountain in Teton County. Megan Freeman climbed the mountain, but altitude sickness and dehydration left her ill and unable to climb down. Ford picked her up and flew her to a nearby hospital.

Harrison Ford is a Great American.
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Old 01-25-2009, 09:48 AM   #16
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Default RE: "Modern Day" Heros.

Great story Tuna Man !......Glad it all worked outfor both you and the plane . Heck my hart was pounding just reading your post.

I think we all could be heros at one time or another.:usaflag:bowdown
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Old 01-26-2009, 03:37 PM   #17
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Default RE: "Modern Day" Heros.

Quote:
fishingfromagunship (1/25/2009)
Quote:
Blake (1/20/2009)

I think Sully did a great job, but I think most pilots would have done the exact same thing.

My dad is a Captain, head of flight training, and head of flight testing for one of the largest airlines in the world. We've discussed this at length from the time the plane hit the water. He was near 42nd street in NYC when this occurred, flying his own flight out of LGA later in the day.

The only option this pilot really had was to ditch into the Hudson.
Not to Monday morning quarterback, but after talking with a lot of my pilot buddies at work, he had a lot of time in the air before he ditched. Most dudes would have pulled a 180 and told ATC to make a whole because here we come. But he did do an awesome job putting it down. Ditching is the most dangerous way to put an airplane down.
He had no propulsion, losing altitude and speed FAST. Pulling a 180 would have killed everyone on board. I don't think most pilots would have done the job he did. There is an 8 part checklist for ditching in water. He didn't have time to check the list. He did it all by instinct...and training. I don't know that most people really understand how amazing this landing was. Talk to pilots without egos and they'll tell you it was a great job.
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Old 01-26-2009, 11:29 PM   #18
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Default RE: "Modern Day" Heros.

Suzette Newcombe

A sixteen year old young lady from Elmore County, Alabama. She awoke to an early morning house fire in her family's home. She first awakened all in the house and made sure they were out. In clearing the house she was trapped upstairs and was overtaken by smoke and extreme heat. She died, but all others that were in the house, Her mother Mandy, father Mike, and four year old brother all lived due to her heroic act.

This took place less than 2 weeks ago on Jan. 16th 2009.
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Old 01-27-2009, 12:23 AM   #19
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Good deal Tuna Man. Sometimes you just gotta do what ya gotta do and let the chips fall where they may.
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Old 05-16-2011, 06:40 PM   #20
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The Complete and Entire Squad of Navy Seals that recently carried out their mission in Pakistan.
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