Who's in Charge of the Cleanup Crews? - Page 3 - Pensacola Fishing Forum

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Old 07-04-2010, 10:04 PM   #21
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all of us who have worked here all our lives have never let the heat stop us. if you cant take the heat then get out of the kitchen.
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Old 07-04-2010, 10:59 PM   #22
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If you want more efficient help then by all mean please provide your time and go help! and why not complain to OSHA or go out and talk to people on the beach and find out who is in charge, but it seems that all anyone like to do is whine, bitch, moan, and complain and not try and help with the situation but like to complain about it
For your information, I’ve already volunteered for the beach clean up. The only beach clean up that volunteers can perform is before the oil reaches the shore. Apparently, you are unaware that volunteers can not engage in direct contact with oil or oil-contaminated materials. Only trained and paid workers are authorized to handle such materials. I believe there is a sign on Pensacola Beach telling people not to handle tar balls.

Your suggestion to talk to people on the beach and find out who is in charge will achieve nothing. I’m sure you have seen the numerous articles and video reports from the state governors on down addressing the fact that they can’t get any answers to their requests. Do you honestly think hourly wage workers on the beach, or even their supervisor(s), would have the answer? I doubt if the majority of them has even heard of OSHA.

I do believe that encumbering beach clean up worker with unnecessary gear reduces the efficiency of the operation. No reason why hard hats and PFDs would be needed in this type of environment.

Since you seem to be heavily involved in the clean up, perhaps you could steer us “whiners”, “bitchers”, “moaners”, and “complainers” in the right direction by providing a point of contact or other volunteer options.

P.S. I know all about volunteering to report new oil on the beaches, oils slicks, and oil-covered wildlife. The appropriate telephone numbers are in my cell phone, should the need arise.
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Old 07-04-2010, 11:19 PM   #23
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So, knowing that the oil is toxic you think they should not apply? I guess these people lives and safety should be compromised so that you can have a nice beach. You sure are cavalier with other peoples lives and health. Hey, I have an idea. How about you take your own ass down to a beach and take pictures and do interviews and then post it. Until then it's just another writer who has never worked a day in his life at anything but criticizing others.
Your usual melodrama. Where exactly did I say that protective measures were not needed? Before going off half-cocked and accusing me of being “cavalier” with the lives of others, please enlighten me….exactly how toxic is crude oil? (Hint: Gasoline is much more toxic to humans than any type of crude oil. Think of the ramifications of the previous statement in our daily lives…try not to get a headache by thinking too hard.) Had you bothered to closely look at the photos, you would have seen that the “tyvec” suits are at “half-mast”. Does this mean anything to you? Don’t you find it ridiculous that beach clean up crews have to walk around with hard hats and PFDs? Perhaps I’m being too “cavalier” and you do have a valid reason for such OSHA requirements. If so, please do tell. Did you even notice the little boy running around in his bathing suit and barefooted? Could it be that someone else was being “cavalier” with his life?

Your idea that I take my “own ass down to a beach and take pictures and do interviews and then post it” would serve no purpose other than provide you with an opportunity for another tirade.

Finally, what exactly gives you the right to label someone as being “just another writer who has never worked a day in his life at anything but criticizing others”? Do you know this writer personally? Have you ever met him? Have you read any other of his works that would allow you to make such a judgment? I’ll bet the answer is “no” to all of these questions.

As I said before….typical WW2 melodrama.
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Old 07-04-2010, 11:50 PM   #24
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These workers need to be protected, but come on. Float vest while cleaning the beach is a little much. OSHA has some protective measures which are beneficial, but they can go overboard from someone sitting at a desk and making decisions that affect us far away. When I worked on a boat I wore one but I have never worn one while walking on the beach. As for cleaning the beaches I think most of us will volunteer when the time comes that BP and the government don't/can't do it and finally asks for volunteers. My understanding is that they don't want us to do so. The bottom line is that we all want the beaches and water cleaned up so that we can get back to normal life.
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Old 07-05-2010, 12:01 AM   #25
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For your information, I’ve already volunteered for the beach clean up. The only beach clean up that volunteers can perform is before the oil reaches the shore. Apparently, you are unaware that volunteers can not engage in direct contact with oil or oil-contaminated materials. Only trained and paid workers are authorized to handle such materials. I believe there is a sign on Pensacola Beach telling people not to handle tar balls.

Your suggestion to talk to people on the beach and find out who is in charge will achieve nothing. I’m sure you have seen the numerous articles and video reports from the state governors on down addressing the fact that they can’t get any answers to their requests. Do you honestly think hourly wage workers on the beach, or even their supervisor(s), would have the answer? I doubt if the majority of them has even heard of OSHA.

I do believe that encumbering beach clean up worker with unnecessary gear reduces the efficiency of the operation. No reason why hard hats and PFDs would be needed in this type of environment.

Since you seem to be heavily involved in the clean up, perhaps you could steer us “whiners”, “bitchers”, “moaners”, and “complainers” in the right direction by providing a point of contact or other volunteer options.

P.S. I know all about volunteering to report new oil on the beaches, oils slicks, and oil-covered wildlife. The appropriate telephone numbers are in my cell phone, should the need arise.
you pointed out only trained workers can help..which is correct but its a FREE 4 hour class...and as far as the "excess" gear...its called liability...if they dont have it and get hurt then guess what there is more money BP pays out...so they require all of it so it cuts the liability out...and yes i am involved in the cleanup process...and i cant stand people that sit behind a computer screen and criticize and armchair quarterback on what needs to be done and changed...you can start by going to this website...they have plenty of info and phone numbers... Unified Command for the BP Oil Spill | Deepwater Horizon Response
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Old 07-05-2010, 12:03 AM   #26
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Where is the training at this time? Phone #?
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Old 07-05-2010, 12:06 AM   #27
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Where is the training at this time? Phone #?
the boat i work on got me on...BP has a office downtown, might could also try the claim office to get a number or address from them
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Old 07-05-2010, 12:54 AM   #28
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you pointed out only trained workers can help..which is correct but its a FREE 4 hour class...and as far as the "excess" gear...its called liability...if they dont have it and get hurt then guess what there is more money BP pays out...so they require all of it so it cuts the liability out...and yes i am involved in the cleanup process...and i cant stand people that sit behind a computer screen and criticize and armchair quarterback on what needs to be done and changed...you can start by going to this website...they have plenty of info and phone numbers... Unified Command for the BP Oil Spill | Deepwater Horizon Response
You have provided nothing that I haven't seen before. As I said earlier, only trained paid personnel are authorized to handle oil contaminated materials. Volunteers will not be involved in beach clean ups. Your opinions concerning whom you can stand are irrelevant and won't cause me to lose any sleep. Some of us have other commitments and can't get on the BP payroll. Since it appears that you're actively involved in the clean up, I'll assume that you are getting paid for your efforts.

Despite your explanation for "excess" gear, there is no way you'll convince anyone that hard hats and PFDs, in this case, are anything else but stupidity on the part of whoever is requiring them.
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Old 07-05-2010, 11:37 AM   #29
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Your usual melodrama. Where exactly did I say that protective measures were not needed? Before going off half-cocked and accusing me of being “cavalier” with the lives of others, please enlighten me….exactly how toxic is crude oil? (Hint: Gasoline is much more toxic to humans than any type of crude oil. Think of the ramifications of the previous statement in our daily lives…try not to get a headache by thinking too hard.) Had you bothered to closely look at the photos, you would have seen that the “tyvec” suits are at “half-mast”. Does this mean anything to you? Don’t you find it ridiculous that beach clean up crews have to walk around with hard hats and PFDs? Perhaps I’m being too “cavalier” and you do have a valid reason for such OSHA requirements. If so, please do tell. Did you even notice the little boy running around in his bathing suit and barefooted? Could it be that someone else was being “cavalier” with his life?

Your idea that I take my “own ass down to a beach and take pictures and do interviews and then post it” would serve no purpose other than provide you with an opportunity for another tirade.

Finally, what exactly gives you the right to label someone as being “just another writer who has never worked a day in his life at anything but criticizing others”? Do you know this writer personally? Have you ever met him? Have you read any other of his works that would allow you to make such a judgment? I’ll bet the answer is “no” to all of these questions.

As I said before….typical WW2 melodrama.

I am not sure what world you actually live in....

I guess you don't live in the world where companies take risks with their employees lives and then have it blow on on them and kill 11 people. I bet there were all kinds of guys just like you saying how stupid some safety requirement was just before the rig blew up. I don't know what those cleaning crews are required to do throughout the day to know whether those suites, masks, PFD's and hard hats are for, but, one thing I am sure of...you don't either. These guys are working at the waters edge and if they are asked to cleanup at the waters edge then it's possible to fall in and under the right currents and a person who is unable to swim could find themselves in trouble. So, while I think it's kinda silly I am not the guy that is going to have to tell the child of one of those workers kids that mommy fell into the water and because she couldn't swim she died. Oh, yeah, part of the chemical makeup of this crude can be chemicals that will cause you to pass out if exposed too long. What if they are working at the waters edge and pass out?

You claim it's no more toxic than gas. Yeah, go expose yourself to both for hours and hours a day and see where that gets you. Both of them are extremely toxic when your exposure is more than the time it takes to fill your gas tank. Then there is the fact that you don't have a clue about the chemical makeup of this crude so that means you are talking out of your ass again, because you don't know what is out there. Then there are the oil dispersant chemicals, those are quite toxic and some would say more so than the crude itself and may also be involved in the cleanup.

http://ricksblog.biz/?p=10692 Here is a link that states pretty clearly what is required and not required but it also states that those situations can change.

And last is, what gives me the right? The same thing that gave you the right to call him credible. You don't know shit about that writer any more than I do. So, what gives you the right to present his information as if he is a viable judge of the quality or quantity of work being done? And I'll bet that beyond the article you read you answer no to all of those same questions. Wow, talk about melodrama.


Oh and then there is this...

Rick Leventhal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Yeah, pretty much what I said, has always been a writer....

What I really found interesting in that wiki about his is that nowhere does it say anything about him ever having held a job where he was required to deal with OSHA requirements, logistics surrounding a cleanup or any other job where managing multiple low wage workers. I would have to assume that his degree in Broadcast Journalism left anything but possibly the simplest of chemistry out of the education. So, yeah, not even close to be a qualified judge of the work, the safety, quality or quantity of the work being done.


Hey, these are contract workers. Feel free to start up your own company, bid to get in there, hire your own elite force of workers and get at it. Until you do that you are just another Monday morning quarterback bitching about something you don't know anything about.
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Old 07-05-2010, 11:40 AM   #30
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You have provided nothing that I haven't seen before. As I said earlier, only trained paid personnel are authorized to handle oil contaminated materials. Volunteers will not be involved in beach clean ups. Your opinions concerning whom you can stand are irrelevant and won't cause me to lose any sleep. Some of us have other commitments and can't get on the BP payroll. Since it appears that you're actively involved in the clean up, I'll assume that you are getting paid for your efforts.

Despite your explanation for "excess" gear, there is no way you'll convince anyone that hard hats and PFDs, in this case, are anything else but stupidity on the part of whoever is requiring them.
Then why do you wear a helmet when you fly...seems a little excess to me...on commerical flights the pilots dont have to wear them...seems like the govt spending more of our money on "excess" things
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