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Old 08-13-2015, 05:08 PM   #1
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Default Tuna!!!

An article by Jim Cox
Quote:
Most of the tuna fishing in our area takes place at the rigs starting seventy-five miles to the southwest. Due to the long runs to get there, this is usually done by big boats and charter boats that specialize in catching tunas. If you can catch the right weather window, the rigs are reachable in smaller center console boats, but everything must line up just perfectly to make that trip.

In recent years, reports of tuna showing up close to Orange Beach have been few and far between. “Years ago, we would consistently see big schools of Yellowfin and Blackfin tuna in open water at places like the elbow and dumping grounds,” said long time offshore fishermen and former television host Mike Ward. “I’m not sure why, but we haven’t been seeing them like we used to.”

Tuna
Schools of Yellowfin tuna like these have been within easy reach from Orange Beach.
I wish I knew why they haven’t been around like they used to be, but more importantly I’d like to figure out why they are here now! Recently, I got a report of schools of tuna around the elbow, which is about forty miles from Perdido Pass. The chance to catch tunas in our small center console boat had me sleepless the night before my trip.

Once I found a small patch of decent water east of the elbow, the tuna were there as promised. Fishing for tuna in open water is much different than fishing for them around rigs. Tuna can make for a maddening day when you see them jumping all around the boat and can’t buy a bite. Next time you see me, ask me how I know!

Tuna can also be very leader shy so as I rigged up for this trip I downsized my leaders to 200 and 130-pound test fluorocarbon. I was ready to go lower if needed, but it wasn’t necessary. Fortunately, they were ready to eat early, late and often. My two lady anglers were busy fighting fish from around 9:30am until we pulled lines in at 7:00pm.

I like to pull my baits way behind the boat when I see tunas busting; they seem to always like a little more distance between the boat and baits than other big game fish. I was pulling Ianders and ballyhoo and was able to to put a nice box of Blackfin and small Yellowfin in the boat. I also had a few billfish knock downs and lost two wahoos as they chewed through my light leaders.

Why they are here right now is the big question. The water to the east has been less than ideal all summer for trolling, but that small patch of pretty water was holding the fish. With this weekend’s Mobile Big Game Fishing Club’s Limited Tournament (for small boats), we should get plenty of reports if the tuna have decided to stick around to give us small boats more chances.
??
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Old 08-13-2015, 05:14 PM   #2
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What's your question Mike?
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Old 08-13-2015, 05:25 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris V View Post
What's your question Mike?
Heard things were kinda slow right now.... Anyone reporting tuna that close? I know how frustrating it can be chasing tuna around in open water. Lol
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Old 08-13-2015, 06:56 PM   #4
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We got on them in open water august 1st within 50 miles or so. Haven't been out since then.
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Old 08-13-2015, 07:13 PM   #5
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Ive caught yellowfin at the elbow and the nipple before
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Old 08-13-2015, 08:16 PM   #6
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What about the offshore stuff out of Mobile that Mobil & Exxon has out there and pipe line it into there plants?

PETROLEUM EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT
OFFSHORE ALABAMA
The earliest exploratory wells in Alabama's offshore waters were drilled in Mobile Bay
by Gulf Refining Company in late 1951 and early 1952. These two early wells were plugged and
abandoned at depths of 10,000 and 11,000 feet after failing to encounter any significant shows of
oil and gas. A period of more than 27 years lapsed before another test well was drilled, but this
next attempt was successful and led to the active drilling and development of the large gas
reserves lying more than 20,000 feet below coastal waters.
On June 21, 1978, Mobil Oil Corporation received a permit from the State Oil and Gas
Board to drill a test well near the mouth of Mobile Bay to a depth of 21,500 feet. This was the
first exploratory well in State offshore waters to test potential reservoirs of Jurassic age, which
are the most prolific oil and gas producing horizons in the onshore region of southwest Alabama.
On October 9, 1979, the well reached a total depth of 21,113 feet, and on November 28, the well
was tested at a rate of 12.2 million cubic feet of gas per day from the Norphlet Formation.
Following this initial discovery, which was later named the Lower Mobile Bay-Mary
Ann Field, high bonuses were paid by operators to explore and develop the hydrocarbon
resources beneath State and adjacent Federal waters. In March of 1981, a total of $449 million
was received by the State in bids for the rights to develop 13 offshore tracts consisting of 55,054
acres, with one tract receiving a bid amounting to more than $31,000 per acre. In February 1982,
the Federal government leased the oil and gas rights to 17 tracts near Alabama's State waters for
bonus monies totaling almost $219 million. Another Federal lease sale of 13 tracts off the
Alabama coast in May 1983 resulted in bonuses totaling almost $41 million. In August 1984, the
State received more than $347 million from leases awarded on 19 offshore tracts consisting of
approximately 75,000 acres. Special trust funds were established for income generated from the
leasing of and production from Alabama's offshore tracts and these funds now total more than
$2.6 billion.
Through 2005, a total of 80 wells had been drilled in Alabama’s coastal waters. Fortyseven
of these wells were permitted to test the Norphlet Formation below a depth of 20,000 feet;
the two earliest wells were drilled to test undifferentiated rocks of Cretaceous age; and 31 wells
have targeted shallow Miocene gas reservoirs generally at depths of less than 3,500 feet.
Operators have experienced a high success rate in drilling wells in Alabama coastal waters. Of
47 Norphlet wells drilled, 38 have tested gas, and of the 31 Miocene wells drilled, 27 have tested
gas. Nineteen gas fields have been established in the offshore region of the State with seven
being productive from the Norphlet Formation and twelve being productive from sands of
Miocene age.
Production of gas from the State's coastal waters, at its peak, was more than 230 billion
cubic feet annually. In 2005, offshore gas production flowed through 47 fixed structures and
totaled nearly 154 billion cubic feet. This accounts for approximately 50% of the total
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Old 08-13-2015, 09:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobinbusan View Post
What about the offshore stuff out of Mobile that Mobil & Exxon has out there and pipe line it into there plants?

PETROLEUM EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT
OFFSHORE ALABAMA
The earliest exploratory wells in Alabama's offshore waters were drilled in Mobile Bay
by Gulf Refining Company in late 1951 and early 1952. These two early wells were plugged and
abandoned at depths of 10,000 and 11,000 feet after failing to encounter any significant shows of
oil and gas. A period of more than 27 years lapsed before another test well was drilled, but this
next attempt was successful and led to the active drilling and development of the large gas
reserves lying more than 20,000 feet below coastal waters.
On June 21, 1978, Mobil Oil Corporation received a permit from the State Oil and Gas
Board to drill a test well near the mouth of Mobile Bay to a depth of 21,500 feet. This was the
first exploratory well in State offshore waters to test potential reservoirs of Jurassic age, which
are the most prolific oil and gas producing horizons in the onshore region of southwest Alabama.
On October 9, 1979, the well reached a total depth of 21,113 feet, and on November 28, the well
was tested at a rate of 12.2 million cubic feet of gas per day from the Norphlet Formation.
Following this initial discovery, which was later named the Lower Mobile Bay-Mary
Ann Field, high bonuses were paid by operators to explore and develop the hydrocarbon
resources beneath State and adjacent Federal waters. In March of 1981, a total of $449 million
was received by the State in bids for the rights to develop 13 offshore tracts consisting of 55,054
acres, with one tract receiving a bid amounting to more than $31,000 per acre. In February 1982,
the Federal government leased the oil and gas rights to 17 tracts near Alabama's State waters for
bonus monies totaling almost $219 million. Another Federal lease sale of 13 tracts off the
Alabama coast in May 1983 resulted in bonuses totaling almost $41 million. In August 1984, the
State received more than $347 million from leases awarded on 19 offshore tracts consisting of
approximately 75,000 acres. Special trust funds were established for income generated from the
leasing of and production from Alabama's offshore tracts and these funds now total more than
$2.6 billion.
Through 2005, a total of 80 wells had been drilled in Alabama’s coastal waters. Fortyseven
of these wells were permitted to test the Norphlet Formation below a depth of 20,000 feet;
the two earliest wells were drilled to test undifferentiated rocks of Cretaceous age; and 31 wells
have targeted shallow Miocene gas reservoirs generally at depths of less than 3,500 feet.
Operators have experienced a high success rate in drilling wells in Alabama coastal waters. Of
47 Norphlet wells drilled, 38 have tested gas, and of the 31 Miocene wells drilled, 27 have tested
gas. Nineteen gas fields have been established in the offshore region of the State with seven
being productive from the Norphlet Formation and twelve being productive from sands of
Miocene age.
Production of gas from the State's coastal waters, at its peak, was more than 230 billion
cubic feet annually. In 2005, offshore gas production flowed through 47 fixed structures and
totaled nearly 154 billion cubic feet. This accounts for approximately 50% of the total

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