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Old 05-14-2015, 09:57 AM   #1
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Default Magnuson-stevens fishery conservation

Section 302 of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSFCMA) established the eight Regional Fishery Management Councils (RFMC). The objectives of these councils are to develop, monitor and revise fishery management plans and data collection programs for domestic and foreign fishing conducted within the 200-mile U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). This is done with the approval and implementation of the Secretary of Commerce, who has stewardship responsibilities under MSFCMA for living marine resources in the EEZ.
The RFMCs derive their existence solely by statute and function as components of the Department of Commerce. Congress specifically funds the Councils, but the Council members are appointed by the Secretary of Commerce from the private sector. Members are not Federal employees. For more information on the RFMC go to www.fisherycouncils.org. There are three RFMCs within the NMFS Southeast Region:
Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council
The Gulf Council consists of the States of Texas Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida and has authority over the fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico seaward of these states except for highly migratory species that occur within the geographical area of authority of more than one of the Councils. The Gulf Council has 17 voting members, with at least one from each state.
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Old 05-14-2015, 10:31 AM   #2
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But Mike, the answer seems to be to allow the gulf states to manage red snapper out to 200 miles so don't confuse me with the fact that the gulf states already manage red snapper out to 200 miles.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:03 AM   #3
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But Mike, the answer seems to be to allow the gulf states to manage red snapper out to 200 miles so don't confuse me with the fact that the gulf states already manage red snapper out to 200 miles.
For Immediate Release
Mary Jane Williamson, Communications Director
703-519-9691, x227
www.asafishing.org / www.keepamericafishing.org
New Report Demonstrates Potential Economic Gains from Reallocations

Recreational landings produce greater economic returns than commercial landings
Alexandria, Va. – May 12, 2015 – A report released today further demonstrates the importance of reviewing how the nation’s marine fisheries are allocated between the recreational and commercial sectors.
The report, “The Economic Gains from Reallocating Specific Saltwater Fisheries,” produced by the American Sportfishing Association (ASA) and Southwick Associates, was introduced at the American Boating Congress, an annual legislative conference co-hosted by organizations from all segments of the boating and fishing industries. This annual event brings hundreds of leaders to Washington D.C. to formulate public policy and present a unified front on issues that impact marine businesses.
The report uses economic contributions estimates and the few fisheries valuation studies available in three mixed sector fisheries to examine the potential gains to be made by increasing the recreational allocation for specific species.
Some of the key findings include:
  • <LI itxtNodeId="199" itxtHarvested="0">Summer Flounder in the Mid-Atlantic: Recreational angler spending supported up to 25,450 jobs in 2011, compared to up to 4,665 jobs supported by commercial production. <LI itxtNodeId="198" itxtHarvested="0">Red Snapper in the Gulf of Mexico: Recreational fishing for red snapper contributes approximately four times more to the nation’s gross domestic product than commercial harvests.
  • Pacific Halibut from California to Washington: Recreational fishing for halibut provides nearly five times more jobs per pound harvested when compared to commercial harvests.
“This report demonstrates how allocating larger shares of specific fisheries to the recreational sector can increase economic activity to the overall benefit to the nation,” said Scott Gudes, ASA’s vice president for Government Affairs. “This isn’t meant to be a comprehensive analysis into these fisheries, but rather an examination based on available data. Further studies are needed, but these preliminary results are very compelling and demand at least a discussion on how our nation’s fisheries should be allocated.”
Despite the tremendous importance that allocation decisions have in maximizing the benefits that our fisheries provide to the nation, federal fisheries managers have not revisited allocations – most of which were determined decades ago – primarily because of a lack of clear guidance on how decisions should be made and because these decisions are inherently difficult.
On April 30, during the House of Representatives markup hearing on a bill sponsored by Rep. Don Young (R-Alaska), H.R. 1335, to reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, an important amendment was offered by Rep. Jeff Duncan (R-S.C.) that would require the development of guidelines for consideration in allocation decisions and a periodic review of allocations in fisheries in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.
“This report further reinforces the importance of Congressman Duncan’s amendment, which will provide a science-based path forward for examination of allocations,” said Mike Leonard, ASA’s Ocean Resource Policy director. “ASA is grateful for Congressman Duncan’s leadership on behalf of the nation’s 11 million saltwater anglers and the 450,000 jobs they support.”
“Obviously there are many factors that need to be considered when determining allocations, and economic value is one of those key factors,” continued Leonard. “It is our hope that this report helps facilitate discussion and examination into the factors that need to go into these important decisions.”
The American Sportfishing Association (ASA) is the sportfishing industry’s trade association committed to representing the interests of the entire sportfishing community. We give the industry a unified voice, speaking out on behalf of sportfishing and boating industries, state and federal natural resource agencies, conservation organizations, angler advocacy groups and outdoor journalists when emerging laws and policies could significantly affect sportfishing business or sportfishing itself. ASA invests in long-term ventures to ensure the industry will remain strong and prosperous, as well as safeguard and promote the enduring social, economic and conservation values of sportfishing in America. ASA also gives America's 60 million anglers a voice in policy decisions that affect their ability to sustainably fish on our nation's waterways through KeepAmericaFishing™, our angler advocacy campaign. America’s anglers generate over $48 billion in retail sales with a $115 billion impact on the nation’s economy creating employment for more than 828,000 people.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:06 PM   #4
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Five of the 17 voting members of the Gulf Council are gulf state directors, 11 are appointed by gulf state governors and only 1 voting member is not directly accountable to the 5 gulf states. Gulf states presently approve fishery management plans. Magnuson-Stevens will have to be changed to make any difference in the ways we manage our fisheries including red snapper.

Gator, the question is, "who owns the fish?" If the answer is all Americans and not just individuals who can afford a $50,000 boat then the 97 percent of Americans who don't fish only have access to their resource through the commercial fisherman.
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:14 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by lbhuntley View Post
Five of the 17 voting members of the Gulf Council are gulf state directors, 11 are appointed by gulf state governors and only 1 voting member is not directly accountable to the 5 gulf states. Gulf states presently approve fishery management plans. Magnuson-Stevens will have to be changed to make any difference in the ways we manage our fisheries including red snapper.

Gator, the question is, "who owns the fish?" If the answer is all Americans and not just individuals who can afford a $50,000 boat then the 97 percent of Americans who don't fish only have access to their resource through the commercial fisherman.
"$50,000 boat?" ... I've got less than 7k in mine (+ a lot of sweat-equity.) And my guess is a lot of those folks paying hundreds of dollars for a four or six hour charter trip can, in fact, afford a $50k boat .... if they wanted one.

By-the-by ... who are these other 97% of Americans you claim are buying $18+ pound red snapper in seafood markets who would be deprived of their "right?" to buy commercially caught ARS? Or ordering if off the menu of fancy restaurants in Atlanta, NYC, Chicago and elsewhere? I don't know any of 'em and I happen to know a few people in those places. Maybe you'd like to revise that 97% number down a bit? Could it actually be 10% or 5% of Americans who consume very expensive commercially caught ARS? Less probably?

And if I didn't bring home a few ARS each year as a byproduct of my recreational fishing activity ... there wouldn't be any pricey commercially caught snapper on the grill around my house ... that's for sure! And as to restaurants .... you're more likely to catch me & mine ordering catfish off the menu than pricey ARS.

Now I've heard it said the dwindling elephant population is a treasure that belongs to all the people of the world, but ya know what? .... I can't buy elephant meat at Winn-Dixie either (but no doubt there's some poacher in Africa would be happy to sell me some if some politically appointed quasi-governmental body would sell them the necessary commercial permits to do so).

But since you've brought up the subject of money vs fishing rights .... how about all those regulations/restrictions that make it pretty much impossible for an average joe to run a part-time commercial fishing business and sell his/her catch locally? Ya can't do it! A commercial fishing cartel has effectively restricted entry into the business, just like car dealers have gotten State legislators to impose all kinds of restrictions that make it illegal to make a sideline income by selling 8 or 10 used cars a year from your home.

Per your line of reasoning ... then I guess since all the wild elk in the US belong to all the people ... and not just those who can afford to hunt them out west - we should have year-round commercial elk hunting for commercial permit holders so the "97%" can exercise their "right?" to buy wild elk meat in the grocery store. Same/same for a lot of species ....freshwater largemouth bass for instance.
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Last edited by AndyS; 05-14-2015 at 01:50 PM.
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